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What do Poles owe to Jews?


modafinil - | 418
27 Jan 2013 #211
I know one Polish person who eats bagels. So I am sorry you are wrong.

I found this a article a little interesting on Krakow pride in obwarzanki
online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703794104575545843564259642.html

'Maria Balinska, author of "The Bagel: The Surprising History of a Modest Bread," disputes the idea that the obwarzanek has a distinct origin. She says the two breads started off as pretty much the same thing, but with different names in Yiddish and Polish. She interviewed older Krakow residents as part of her research, who said the two breads were indistinguishable as recently as the 1930s.'

'"They look pretty much the same, and both are based on a pretty simple premise," says Patrick Vaughan, a 45-year-old American who has been living in Krakow for about 10 years.'

'Like other obwarzanek lovers, Ms. Biedo is steeped in the bread's lore. She recounts the tale of a group of Polish soldiers who are said to have beaten back a German onslaught in 1410 after scarfing obwarzanek.'

'Krakow's campaign for the obwarzanek started several years ago, after Kazimierz Czekaj, a baker here, noticed that foreigners and even the local press were increasingly referring to the bread as a bagel.'

'Both breads, she says, most likely derived from a white, braided German specialty-the pretzel.'

For me if it's round with a hole and boiled before baking, it's in the bagel class.
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
27 Jan 2013 #212
For me if it's round with a hole and boiled before baking, it's a bagel.

:):):) Krakow obwarzanek is a bit older than bagle.

I know one Polish person who eats bagels. So I am sorry you are wrong.

Oh my God, you ruined my reputation in the PF now!!! :):):):):):):):):)

PS. Hey, come on, how many Poles reside in Poland at present? :):)
modafinil - | 418
27 Jan 2013 #213
If Obwarzanek Krakowski does or has already received European protected status it will still end up being called a Krakow Bagel as obwarzanek would be too much of a mouthful for English toungues. (pun intended).

I've always seen the humbler, non-twisted, smaller holed variety as being a Polish-Jewish import here in the UK and it seems that way in the US also. So you may not be appreciative of them within Poland but you should pay your dues(another pun!) for being one of Poland's notable exports, possibly second only to wodka in popularity and prominence.
yehudi 1 | 432
27 Jan 2013 #214
[quote=pawian]I am sorry but I suppose you mistake two products:

I am sorry but you mistake two kinds of Jews.
The bagel you show as "Jewish Bagel" is known in Israel as an American Bagel.
The one you show as "Krakow bagel" is what they sell in Israeli grocery stores and kiosks. But they just call it a "Baigeleh".

It comes with poppy seeds, sesame seeds or sesame+zaatar (a middle east spice). It has a sprinkling of salt too.
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
27 Jan 2013 #215
OK , this way or another, never mind.
The problem is that the discussion about bagels is senseless here as Poles do not owe them to Jews. It is quite the opposite.
yehudi 1 | 432
27 Jan 2013 #216
The problem is that the discussion about bagels is senseless here as Poles do not owe them to Jews.

You are so right. I think that we Jewish people should send all our bagels back to Poland where they belong. What would you like on your bagel?
Paulina 9 | 1,448
27 Jan 2013 #218
Pawian, yehudi, I shall bring peace between you two and mention something we rather for sure owe to Jews ;) - it's "chałka" (known in English as "challah"):

You can buy it in probably every bakery or store and I personally love it - it's soft, fluffy and sweet :D Mmmm...

Btw, what about halva ("chałwa" in Polish)? How did it end up in Poland? My mum loves it!
Suwka - | 21
27 Jan 2013 #219
cebularz - [tse-boo-lahsh] m. tart or pie topped with onion;
yehudi 1 | 432
27 Jan 2013 #220
Btw, what about halva ("chałwa" in Polish)? How did it end up in Poland? My mum loves it!

I think that came to Poland from Turkey. It's everywhere in the middle east.
nasadki - | 43
27 Jan 2013 #221
Halva is popular all over Eastern Europe, Turkey, like yehudi said would be a good guess.

The Balkans are full of foods that originated in the Levant, I'm sure a few have made it to other parts of Central/Eastern Europe.
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
27 Jan 2013 #222
You are so right. I think that we Jewish people should send all our bagels back to Poland where they belong.

No, keep your Baigeleh, we don`t need them, the daily production in Krakow is 70.000. :):):)

What would you like on your bagel?

My staple addition has always been salt. Big chunks of salt from Wieliczka mine. :):):)

Pawian, yehudi, I shall bring peace between you two

Peace? We don`t need any peace bringing. We are peaceful people. :"):):):)

mention something we rather for sure owe to Jews ;) - it's "chałka" (known in English as "challah"):

Oh, really? I forgot about it, indeed.

Btw, what about halva ("chałwa" in Polish)? How did it end up in Poland? My mum loves it!

I bought a big lump of chałwa last week and today I am looking at it and it has become so tiny!! :):):)

I think that came to Poland from Turkey.

Yes! Even the name is Arabic.

cebularz - [tse-boo-lahsh] m. tart or pie topped with onion;

Really? Thanks to Jews? I had no idea.
Suwka - | 21
28 Jan 2013 #223
Really? Thanks to Jews? I had no idea.

The first cebularze were baked in szabaśnik [roaster] by Jews from Old Town and Wieniawa in Lublin in XIX century
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #224
I've just learnt that Morozowski is Jewish!
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #226
Andrzej Morozowski. How come you don't know him?
gumishu 11 | 5,164
28 Jan 2013 #227
I've just learnt that Morozowski is Jewish!

so is Sekielski I guess

Morozowski is Jewish, don't actually know about Sekielski
jon357 63 | 15,214
28 Jan 2013 #228
Would you also describe them as Poles?
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #229
Who do you ask this question to?
jon357 63 | 15,214
28 Jan 2013 #230
Who wants to answer?
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #231
He's Polish as well.
All in all it's up to one's own declaration what ethnic one indentifies oneself with.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
28 Jan 2013 #232
I think that came to Poland from Turkey.

I thought about this too.

Btw, yehudi, is challah eaten only on Sabbath and holidays or also as daily bread?

cebularz - [tse-boo-lahsh] m. tart or pie topped with onion;

Funny, I've never heard of cebularz although my voivodeship is next to lubelskie!
The only thing that comes to my mind as looking similar to cebularz is "bułka z pieczarkami" sold in "Pod Telegrafem": podtelegrafem.pl/pl/wyroby/garmazeria/przekaski/

It's a bread roll with champignons, onion and cheese.
But I doubt it's anything regional.

Halva is popular all over Eastern Europe

Yes, I know they have it in Russia!
Btw, is it known in the West?

Peace? We don`t need any peace bringing. We are peaceful people. :"):):):)

If you say so :))))

I bought a big lump of chałwa last week and today I am looking at it and it has become so tiny!! :):):)

My mum has a similar problem, so she buys it rarely :)) I, on the other hand, will eat a few bites and it's enough for me ;) It has an intense, peculiar bitter-sweet taste :)

I've just learnt that Morozowski is Jewish!

And Marcin Meller, Bronisław Wildstein. Also Kazimiera Szczuka has Jewish roots. (I didn't know about Meller and Szczuka, I just googled them a minute ago ;)).

Would you also describe them as Poles?

lol
No, jon357, we would describe them as Martians ;D

Would you ask the same question about Piotr Gąsowski, Michał Figurski (Russian roots), Grzegorz Miecugow (Armenian-Georgian roots) or Robert Makłowicz (Armenian-Ukrainian-Hungarian-Austrian roots lol)?

A dish we owe to Jews is "karp po żydowsku" (gefilte fish):
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
28 Jan 2013 #233
Sorry guys, but you are wandering off a bit. Although they are known people, we certainly can`t classify them as worthy of being put in this thread whose title you know. Come on, comparing Wildstein and Tuwim!!??:?

Please, stop polluting this thread with random names. Create a new thread called: Contemporary Poles of Jewish origin.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
28 Jan 2013 #234
Wait a minute, Jerzy Hoffman, Irena Szewińska and Roman Polański aren't dead yet! :))
;)
nasadki - | 43
28 Jan 2013 #235
that fish looks absolutely disgusting. Do Poles eat that? Or only jews?
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #236
Please, stop polluting this thread with random names.

Ok as you wish, but before I comply I must ask:

Piotr Gąsowski

what about him?
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
28 Jan 2013 #237
Wait a minute, Jerzy Hoffman, Irena Szewińska and Roman Polański aren't dead yet! :))

Right! :):):):)
OK, the title of the new thread should be: Contemporary, locally known Poles with Jewish roots.
zetigrek
28 Jan 2013 #238
Why locally? Don't you watch tv at all?
Paulina 9 | 1,448
28 Jan 2013 #239
we certainly can`t classify them as worthy of being put in this thread

Is Agnieszka Holland worthy enough? ;)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agnieszka_Holland

"Agnieszka Holland was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1948. She is the daughter of two prominent journalists, Irena (née Rybczyńska) and Henryk Holland,[1] a Catholic mother and a Jewish father. Holland herself was raised without religion. Her father's parents were killed in the ghetto; her mother participated in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising and was a member of the Polish Underground."

Some of her films:

In Darkness (2011) (Academy Award nominee for the best foreign language film)
Washington Square (1997)
Total Eclipse (1995)
The Secret Garden (1993) (Nominated for BAFTA Film Award)
Europa, Europa (1990, Academy Award nominee for the best screenplay)
To Kill a Priest (1988)
Angry Harvest (Bittere Ernte, 1985, Germany, Academy Award nominee for the best foreign language film)

"The Secret Garden" - I loved that film! :)





The whole world is a garden :)

"Europa, Europa"

OK, the title of the new thread should be: Contemporary, locally known Poles with Jewish roots.

What do you mean by "locally"?
OP pawian 170 | 11,316
28 Jan 2013 #240
Why locally? Don't you watch tv at all?

I only watch the news twice or thrice a month.

Locally, because they are only known in Poland. I don`t care if some armpit villagers from Belarus watch Polish TV and recognise Morozowski and other guys.

Simple.

Is Agnieszka Holland worthy enough? ;)

Yes! Very good. She is known globally.

What do you mean by "locally"?

Above.


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