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Did Poles living in Germany support Hitler's rise to power before World War II?


Alien 18 | 4,771
12 Aug 2023 #1
Did Poles in pre-war Germany support Hitler's coming to power, and if so, for how long?
johnny reb 47 | 7,049
12 Aug 2023 #2
No, no they did not.
Hitlers image was built on pure propaganda that the Poles eaily saw through.
Especially the Polish Christians.
Lyzko 45 | 9,281
12 Aug 2023 #3
As Hitler considered the Poles along with other Slavs "Untermenschen" or subhuman, the answer is also unequivocally no.

Dmowski and Moscicki were indeed nationalists, but scarcely Hitler supporters and the latter surely wouldn't have regarded their sentiments anyhow, albeit in close agreement.
Ironside 53 | 12,460
12 Aug 2023 #4
Untermenschen

His stance on who is and who isn;t was pretty much flexible. I'm sure if Poland remained as his ally he would declare Poles to be pure Ayrans... So don't be so cocky sure, a country infested by Jews Hitler really hated but Poles because they stood in his way ....

Moscicki were indeed nationalists

you are an idiot! Someone who is ignoramous and doesn;t know what he is talking about, and jews are racists...

Did Poles in pre-war Germany support

who the hell knows? What kind of lazy question is that? Are all Germans support Merkel?
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #5
As Hitler considered the Poles along with other Slavs "Untermenschen" or subhuman,

I always wondered how his partaking in the funeral of polish Pilsudski fit into that world view.....



rarehistoricalphotos.com/adolf-hitler-memorial-pilsudski-1935/

...In the picture, you can see Adolf Hilter during the service for Piłsudski and a symbolic coffin with a Polish flag and eagle. This was the only time that Fuhrer attended a holy mass as a leader of the Third Reich and probably one of the last times when he was in a church.....

One could guess there was more at play at that time....maybe he hoped for polish allies?

...After he attacked Poland, he would say that things wouldn't turn out like that if old Pilsudski was still alive. He was also very excited when Pilsudski congratulated him on winning the elections in 1933....
Ironside 53 | 12,460
12 Aug 2023 #6
I always wondered how

Sure, Italians and Japs were Aryans and Poles were not? Think about that... or Slovack :D or Highlanders in Poland. It rather telling...
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #7
Yes....history wasn't cut out and dried back then...
jon357 74 | 21,842
12 Aug 2023 #8
Did Poles in pre-war Germany support Hitler's

I doubt it, given that the fascists considered them to be 'untermensch'. Especially though not exclusively those Poles of the Jewish faith.

Then again, there were conservative Rabbis who encouraged their congregations to vote NSDAP because they thought the ridiculous crap about 'kinder kuche kirche' outweighed the thuggish street violence and endless rhetoric against Jewish people.
Ironside 53 | 12,460
12 Aug 2023 #9
Did Poles in pre-war Germany

you pretty much declared yourslef German. You would be fine in the30' Germany. the ego behing this topic...
Lyzko 45 | 9,281
12 Aug 2023 #10
@B.B. in "Triumph of the Will", you will have no doubt noticed the clear presence of certain select Black Africans from former Namibia included in his Conventions (Reichsparteitage).

Was he thus a friend of the Black man??

Attending Pilsudki's burial was a political act as well, as there was no love lost between Hitler and the Polish people, above all, Poland's Jewish population.

@Ironside,
Your intentional twisting of words in order to humiliate is quite irritating and unprofessional. I've tried to give you a chance to improve but you fight my efforts at every turn.

Personally, I think your English is in truth better than it looks. I mean no one can be that ignorant!
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #11
Attending Pilsudki's burial was a political act as well,

Still....attending the funeral of a "subhuman"??? That makes no sense...
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #12
So don't be so cocky sure, a country infested by Jews

Good point, Iron.

If they were Germans like the rest of the country they would act German, feel German, happily sing the German national anthem, and would be indistinguishable from Germans.

Instead, they did everything humanly possible to stand out separate and apart.
OP Alien 18 | 4,771
12 Aug 2023 #13
Instead, they did everything humanly possible to stand out separate and apart.

It's not true, they were much more integrated in Germany than in Poland.
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #14
integrated

1. Define "integrated". A reminder: Even criminals serving life are "integrated".
2. Did they act German, feel German, and happily sing the German national anthem? This is a yes-no question so no essays are needed.
3. Could you visually tell them apart from German Germans?
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #15
Instead, they did everything humanly possible to stand out separate and apart.

On the other hand I find that admirable....keeping their identity so far away from home, against so much adversity....you need a special kind of grit for that!

They didn't leave their homeland like your usual immigrant, searching for easier, better shores....
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #16
On the other hand I find that admirable...

I find it suicidal.
Sorry, BB, history proved you wrong and me right.
Every animal wants to blend. That's why zebras don't come with police lights on their heads and why rats are gray.
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #18
...and the consequences...so don't cry to me when stupid acts produce stupid and very predictable results.
Bobko 25 | 1,957
12 Aug 2023 #19
What a strange topic...

Not Poles, but Poles in Germany. How many were there? Are you talking about Polish citizens living in Germany, or ethnic Poles with German citizenship?
OP Alien 18 | 4,771
12 Aug 2023 #20
What a strange topic

Especially for you: In 1925, the census revealed that 780,000 Poles lived in Germany.
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #21
In 1925, the census revealed that 780,000 Poles lived in Germany.

Germany should have deported every single one for being Poles instead of Germans. Germany is for Germans - just as Poland is for Poles.

Are you going to give me your definition of "integrated"?
OP Alien 18 | 4,771
12 Aug 2023 #22
Germany should have deported every single one for being Poles instead of Germans. Ge

It wouldn't be that easy because they lived in the former Polish lands or in the Ruhr area where they worked in mines.
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #24
How many Poles were in the German army on September 1, 1939?
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #25
.....hmmm....going only about a ..'ski as family name....lotsa!
jon357 74 | 21,842
12 Aug 2023 #26
ski as family name

I was once at a business meeting in Poznan where there was a group from Germany. All the Poles had German names and all the Germans had Polish names.
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,810
12 Aug 2023 #27
Heh:)

There are studies!

file:///C:/!MY%20STUFF/!MY%20DOWNLOADS/Dr%C3%A4ger-Schmuck2009.pdf

...it begins with page 328:

....

3.1 Slavonic names in Germany

According to Naumann (2007), 15% of surnames in his data are Slavonic in origin. This fact is a
result of the long language contact between German and West Slavonic languages, especially
Polish and Czech. ....


There is even a graphic showing the most -ski's in Germany! Especially East-Germany is fairly dark with -ski's...."Gerpolia", heh:)
Novichok 5 | 7,764
12 Aug 2023 #28
going only about a ..'ski as family name....lotsa!

A -ski is not enough to be Polish or a Pole. If they were simply Germans but with -ski in the last name you wouldn't make this distinction:

Poles make great Germans! :)

...a statement equal to: Gemans make great Germans!
We are back to the "Poles and Jews" discussion.
OP Alien 18 | 4,771
13 Aug 2023 #29
We are back to the "Poles and Jews" discussion.

No, we are not back to the "Poles and Jews" discussion. Let's stay on topic. I do not know how many Poles were in the Wehrmacht in 1939, but I know that after the occupation of the Czech Republic and Poland, neither Poles nor Czechs were drafted into the German army. Hitler simply did not consider the Czechs to be very useful on the battlefield and he did not want the Poles because he knew that at the first opportunity they would cross over to the other side.
Lyzko 45 | 9,281
13 Aug 2023 #30
Correct here, Bobko!
Ck. out old Polish stamps from the '30's and above "Danzig", proudly shows a profile of Hitler.


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