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Polish mathematicians who solved the Enigma machine


MediaWatch 10 | 945
7 Mar 2015 #31
I think its absolutely disgusting for the British and Pro-Brits.. who made movies like "Enigma" and "Imitation Game", which give ZERO credit to the Polish people who were the ones who FIRST broke the difficult Nazi German code Enigma... and NOT the Brit Alan Turing.

Polish people get NO credit for breaking the Enigma Code in Pro-British/Anti-Polish PROPAGANDA movies like "Imitation Game" and "Enigma"

polishamericanreview.com/par2_025.htm
cms 9 | 1,255
7 Mar 2015 #32
Its a movie made for entertainment. there is nothing to stop a Polish director making his own version of the story and marketing it.
jon357 71 | 20,468
7 Mar 2015 #33
Why would a film about Alan Turing's life be used to propagate information about the history of other countries?

A bit like saying that when the Americans made the Ron Burgundy film they should have constantly reminded viewers that television was invented by a Scotsman...
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
7 Mar 2015 #34
yeh mediawatch apparently you will find that actually the movie 'Enigma' gave credit to the Americans! Ignoring both the Polish mathemeticians AND ' the Brit' Turing and the rest of the team at Bletchley!
Harry
7 Mar 2015 #35
And the French intelligence service who obtained the data the Poles needed to reverse-engineer a three-rotor machine. And the German spy who got that data in the first place. Not that it enabled anybody to crack the four-, five-, six-, or seven-rotor machine the Nazis used.
dolnoslask 6 | 3,070
16 Oct 2016 #36
Nice to see the early contribution made by Polish mathematicians being recognized and remembered .

Poland's Enigma mathematicians honoured

bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-37668115
Marsupial - | 886
16 Oct 2016 #37
Sorry I thought that movie was sci fi? Was I wrong?
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
18 Jun 2022 #38
In the winter of 1932-33, Polish mathematician Marian Rejewski deduced the pattern of wiring inside the three rotating wheels of the Enigma machine.

This was BEFORE Poland handed over this information to Britain.
The Polish government is claiming that Bletchley Park's achievement would have been impossible without the contributions of Polish cryptographers who had been working on the problem since the early 1930s.

The time has come to give credit where credit is due and that is to Poland.
jon357 71 | 20,468
18 Jun 2022 #39
Isn't a great deal of credit given to Rejewski?

There are streets named after him in Poland, a statue in Bydgoszcz and three memorials lo him in the UK, one at Bletchley Park, one at Boxmoor where he lived between 1943 and 1946 and one in Central London

After all, he mathematically calculated how the original machine rotors were set, on the basic of intelligence supplied to Poland by the French and his own mathematical skill.

But then again you're just trolling.

The Luftwaffe initially used the type of encryption machine that Rejewski broke, however the Kriegsmarine used a more complex one with a fourth rotor and the Luftwaffe started to use a more complex system in early 1939 and added complexities to the system later. These were analysed and solved by Alan Turing and his team on the basis of Rejewski and his colleague Zygalski's pre-war work and on newer technologies developed at Bletchley Park and on work by Turing and his team.

You shouldn't be under the illusion that the actual messages were decrypted by anyone other than the (mostly young and female) codebreakers at Bletchley using pencils and paper. Even after the machines were broken using Bombes, the messages still came out as code.

And of course they also broke the Japanese encryption machines at Bletchley.

Rejewski by the way spent most of the war in France and then the UK (as a member of the Polish Army) decrypting hand-cyphered codes for the Poles at Boxmoor where there is a memorial to him and Zygalski.

He returned after the war to Poland and died in 1980.

Details of his work on cryptanalysis came out relatively late. This is not unusual. The cryptanalysts at Bletchley Park and other secret establishments were not allowed to discuss that they were even there for decades after and most died without their role being acknowledged. There are aspects of their work that are still classified to this day.
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
19 Jun 2022 #40
But then again you're just trolling.

Oh joun, shut up for once and quit your clever trolling.
Polish Codebreakers Cracked Enigma In 1932, before Alan Turing.
The British and French abandoned their decoding efforts out of sheer frustration, convinced that no one could crack this new Enigma code.
Poland refused to give up on the impossible.
So, Warsaw turned to a pair of agents in its top-secret cypher bureau to do what seemed to be the impossible, solve the riddle of the Enigma.

Lieutenant Colonel Karol Langor and Major Maksymilian Ciężki, turned to a team of mathematicians.
Langor and Ciężki recruited directly from Poznan University.
Rejewski who had demonstrated a particular aptitude for code-breaking was tasked, on his own, in secret with solving Enigma.
It took him just six weeks to crack it.
So quit trying to steal that credit from Poland with your trolling, joun.
jon357 71 | 20,468
19 Jun 2022 #41
Polish Codebreakers Cracked Enigma In 1932,

Rzewuski and Zygakski calculated how they set the rotors.

Unfortunately the Germans changed the system in January 1939 and in any case, the kriegsmarine used a more complicated system.

So quit trying to steal that credit from Poland

You're still pretending to ignore the huge amount of work at Bletchley Have you been to the museum there or to the Warsaw Technical Museum?

Thought not. Evidently you prefer to uncritically cut n' paste from a lowbrow website here: militaryhistorynow.com/2018/10/04/marian-rejewski-meet-the-polish-cryptographer-who-cracked-germanys-top-secret-enigma-code-seven-years-before-ww2/
amiga500 2 | 1,377
19 Jun 2022 #42
Rzewuski and Zygakski calculated how they set the rotors.

My mom was involved in IEEE granting a Milestone Award to Rejewski, Różycki and Zygalski.

poland.pl/business-and-science/achievements-science/how-enigma-codebreakers-poland-changed-world/

ethw.org/Milestones:First_Breaking_of_Enigma_Code_by_the_Team_of_Polish_Cipher_Bureau,_1932-1939

"Today historians from around the world agree that through their work the mathematicians from Poland contributed to ending the Second World War. Years later John Irving Good, a British Professor who worked at Bletchley Park during WWII, described one of the theorems formulated by Rejewski during the pioneer attack on the Enigma code as "a theorem that won the Second World War.""
jon357 71 | 20,468
19 Jun 2022 #43
Exactly.

It's crazy to say they don't receive credit. There are museums and statues now.

Of course so much of their work and that at Bletchley was secret for decades so there was very little that could be said until recently.

They (Rzewuski etc and the Bletchley Codebreakers).shortened the war be a couple of years yet could never talk about it.

Doubtless there are more people like that, people who work behind the scenes and can never discuss it.
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
19 Jun 2022 #44
Evidently you prefer to uncritically cut n' paste from a lowbrow website here:

No, actually I knew you would find that website to argue my findings so I copy and pasted just enough for you to find it and post it. lol

Now that you have made a fool out of yourself again by posting the facts that Poland indeed takes the credit for the accomplishment and not Britian as you tried to claim.

Thank you for confirming it for us all to see.
jon357 71 | 20,468
19 Jun 2022 #45
my findings

The website you cut and pasted from?

The lowbrow popular history page? The one you copied here word for word without referencing?

as you tried to claim

Are you on drugs?

As you were told, two Polish mathematicians calculated how the rotors were wired, however the system was changed before the war started.

Nobody "claims credit" - in fact, all parties are now dead, however the incredible work at Bletchley Park and the contribution of Rzewuski and Zygakski are both acknowledged by the appropriate authorities.
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
19 Jun 2022 #46
The one you copied here word for word

I knew you would confirm that reference for me. lol
And not all of it was word for word was it ?

Nobody "claims credit" -

Poland does.
You tried to though when you posted this

These were analysed and solved by Alan Turing and his team

It was solved by Rejewski and given to Turnung.
Poland is the hero in this case and doesn't care to share their brilliance with the Brits on this one.
Sorry joun, twist it as you may with your slippery snake oil.
Miloslaw 14 | 4,425
19 Jun 2022 #47
Poland is the hero in this case and doesn't care to share their brilliance with the Brits on this one.

You really are an idiot.
This whole project worked because of Anglo Polish collaboration.
Something that has continued since the war.
Neither the Brits nor the Poles can claim they solved this problem.
They could not have done it alone.
Typical Jim ignorance.
Przelotnyptak1 - | 272
19 Jun 2022 #48
[quote=Miloslaw]This whole project worked because of Anglo Polish collaboration.

Milo, why do you jump in, both feet, and spew the half-truths? This whole project, the collaboration worked like magic for the Brits. Polish counterintelligence

broke the code and gave the Enigma to Brits, and all they have done was dismiss the true code breakers and take credit for themselves. In the meantime, the Germans changed the code. Enigma did not work any longer. Brits wherein the panic mode. They tried and tried again, to no avail. After controlling the quivering upper lip, they bagged, dismissed Polish mathematicians to comeback, and solve the problem, Which they did, only to be ignored again by the oiled.,sneaky serpents, the credit grabbers.
jon357 71 | 20,468
19 Jun 2022 #49
broke the code

Two Polish mathematicians, as mentioned in this thread, figured out how the rotors for one version of the Enigma machine were wired in 1932.

the Enigma

Was changed in 1939. Already mentioned in this thread.

dismiss the true code breakers and take credit for themselves. I

Rubbish. The two mathematicians were in Vichy France until 1943, The codebreakers were (mostly young and female) British citizens. Rzewuski and Zygakski came to England in 1943 and were employed by the Polish army

Nobody was "dismissed", nobody "took credit" from anyone else.

The rest of your post is even more pointless and inaccurate than the first. part

The work he in Hut 8 at Bletchley Park by Professor Turing and his team really did change the world. Some of his work led to the Manchester Mark One, the world's first computer.

The pre-war contribution of the two Polish mathematicians is amply recognised in both countries. Its quality speaks for itself without the insane (Jim) or the ignorant (you) trying to troll about things of which you know nothing.
Miloslaw 14 | 4,425
19 Jun 2022 #50
The pre-war contribution of the two Polish mathematicians is amply recognised in both countries

Correct.

Jim.and Ptak are both ignorant of the actual facts.
No surprise that they both live in America, an unfortunately increasingly polarised and ignorant nation.
Come on America!
You can be better than this!
Przelotnyptak1 - | 272
19 Jun 2022 #51
or the ignorant (you) trying to troll about things of which you know nothing.

You are right, Jon. I don't want to know the British version; I deal in truth. Stop that quivering lip of yours; you remind me of a Pack-man.

Nobody was "dismissed", nobody "took credit" from anyone else.

Yeah, sure, Jon

Rubbish. The two mathematicians were in Vichy France until 1943,

If one accepts your superior British logic, one must accept the "fact" that in order brake the Enigma code, one must reside in Britain, the center of the universe

Heee, you are slippery even for a serpent.
Miloslaw 14 | 4,425
19 Jun 2022 #52
I deal in truth

No you dont.
You are a complete ignoramus that has no comprehension of Anglo Polish collaboration during WW2.
jon357 71 | 20,468
19 Jun 2022 #53
Yeah, sure

Yes sure.

The facts are all very well documented.

There are two museums, a host of memorials to the people involved and more books than you can shake a stick at.

ou are a complete ignoramus that has no comprehension of Anglo Polish collaboration during WW2.

Very true.
Przelotnyptak1 - | 272
19 Jun 2022 #54
You can be better than this!

Come on, Milo, Ask your dad how well he was treated. My relatives were treated poorly. Please read Monte Casino by M. Wankowicz, and then you might understand why Brits, according to slippery Jon, did not need a big military, just many buffoons with the swagger sticks. They were not there to bleed or die, Gurkas, Shiks Poles were for bleeding, and tricksters were for glory. I am sure you are familiar with "The Bridge too Far."Do you know that Poland's casualty, in one city, was greater than in Great Britain, all forces combined?

The facts are all very well documented.

Jon, you expect me to trust British sources?
Miloslaw 14 | 4,425
19 Jun 2022 #55
Come on, Milo, Ask your dad how well he was treated

I did,before he died and he loved Britain for giving him a second chance in life, grabbed it by both hands and was hugely successful.

Monte Casino

I knew many men, some of them uncles, who were there and they loved Britain and the British too.
You speak with forked tongue my friend.
And with a lack of true knowledge.
Polish history has always had a degree of revisionism in it.
We really don't need people like you trying to tarnish more recent Polish history with your ignorance.
Przelotnyptak1 - | 272
19 Jun 2022 #56
[quote=Miloslaw]You are a complete ignoramus that has no comprehension of Anglo Polish collaboration during WW2.

Heeee,Heeee. Heeeee. If you mean how they betrayed us, sold us down the drain, used us when we served their purpose, then discarded most of us like a dirty rag.

If you are talking about this collaboration, think before you call anybody an ignoramus; better yet, look in the mirror.

[quote=Miloslaw]We really don't need people like you trying to tarnish more recent Polish history with your ignorance.

I do not call you ignorant, the dullest knife in the drawer, brainless nincompoop, a man with the limited intelligence, but I won't, because you suffer enough, a joke, stumbling around with no apparent purpose or steady set of beliefs I could speak your language, write a few pages about your shortcomings

But I won't; you are Polish after all, poisoned by British propaganda, but Polish nevertheless. If you plan on talking to me, use civilized language, or wait for the return of your equal, Szczelec

[quote=Miloslaw]who were there and they loved Britain and the British too.

Now that's a bald-faced lie; next, you outdo your unfathomable assessment and come up with another doozie and inform me that the British love us back, with passion. By the way, I was not going to go the bragging pat, but you asked for it. The history of my brothers is written in blood, from Syberia to Monte Cassino, to the British Isles, so please don't start with your uncles, who are probably honorable men. Read The Monte Cassino, by M.Wankowicz on eyewitness, not someone writing from a hotel room or you and Jon relying on manipulations. Then, perhaps in the best interest of both of us, ignore me if you can't act like a civilized man.
amiga500 2 | 1,377
20 Jun 2022 #57
I was not going to go the bragging pat, but you asked for it

Another Polam on meth. hey get over your white trash problem and just admit both the poles and english helped defeat hitler.
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
20 Jun 2022 #58
What about the Great United States of America and Russia's part in it ?
The credit of breaking the Enigma however goes to Poland not giving up on it when everyone else did.
Hail Poland who saved thousands of lives because of there perseverance.
amiga500 2 | 1,377
20 Jun 2022 #59
however goes to Poland not giving up on it when everyone else did.

Yes the Polish were using mathematicians whilst the British were using Linguists to little success in the 30s, only after they got the info and theorems from the Poles did the lightbulb switch on to use mathematicians.
johnny reb 33 | 7,332
20 Jun 2022 #60
And back then in the 30's, Poland did not have any state of the art equipment (computers) or facilities that were modern.
It was mostly done with shear brain power and pencils and paper.
Poland deserves the first row seat.


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