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Popular Polish First Names?


Zed - | 195
3 Nov 2010 #121
I beg to differ. Zbigniew is a polish name. Do not think Bulgarians have anything similar to that name.
Natasa 1 | 580
3 Nov 2010 #122
Slavic origin given names - are derived from the Slavic languages and most popular in Slavic countries such as: Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, etc. Slavic names are either peaceful or warlike in character, have often pre-Christian or medieval origin and apart from other cultures do not refer directly to gods or weapon.

Slavic names popular in Poland
Feminine:

Bogna, Bogdana, Bogumiła, Bogusława, Bolesława, Bożena, Bronisława, Czesława, Dąbrówka, Dobroniega, Dobrosława, Gniewomira, Godzimira, Godzisława, Gorzysława, Grzymisława, Kazimiera, Ludmiła, Marzanna Mieczysława, Milena, Miła, Mira, Mirosława, Radosława, Sławomira, Sobiesława, Stanisława, Sulisława, Wacława, Wiesława, Władysława, Zdzisława...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_names
Seanus 15 | 19,706
3 Nov 2010 #123
I meant that Zbigniew is popular too, but not in Bulgaria.
zetigrek
3 Nov 2010 #124
My guess would be that most popular are Stanisław, Przemysław, Zbigniew, Kazimierz, Władysław, etc.

What about Mirosław? Mirosław and Radosław sounds modern (contrary to the mentioned rest). Have you heard anyone at the age of 25 with the name Zbigniew or Władysław?
Paulina 10 | 1,781
3 Nov 2010 #125
Mirosław sounds modern? I wouldn't say so... But I guess you're right about Radosław - there was one Radosław at my year at my univeristy. You can shorten it to Radek and this makes it sound more modern, I think. The same is with Przemysław - Przemek, that's why I mentioned it.

Have you heard anyone at the age of 25 with the name Zbigniew or Władysław?

No, I don't think so. My uncle's name is Zbigniew, but he's older, of course.
You can find Slavic names more often among older people, of course, especially in the countryside.

view-card.com/Kartki-Kartka-Kartke-PL/Najpopularniejsze-Imiona-w-Polsce-Imiona-Kobiet-Imiona-Mezczyzn-Top-50.php

5. STANIS£AW 632.666
17. ZBIGNIEW 359.076
22. KAZIMIERZ 282.202
30. MIROS£AW 221.970
32. S£AWOMIR 207.288
33. JAROS£AW 206.743
35. WIES£AW 194.354
37. W£ADYS£AW 186.115
40. ZDZIS£AW 167.080
42. MIECZYS£AW 162.329
45. PRZEMYS£AW 155.804
47. CZES£AW 148.557
zetigrek
3 Nov 2010 #126
You can shorten it to Radek and this makes it sound more modern, I think. The same is with Przemysław - Przemek, that's why I mentioned it.

Mirosław - Mirek, Miro, Miras, Miruś, Mireczek...

Mirosław sounds modern? I wouldn't say so...

Why not? It's quite popular name among people in their 30s.

Oh and Jarosław is also modern. I know few Jareks in my age.
Paulina 10 | 1,781
3 Nov 2010 #127
Why not? It's quite popular name among people in their 30s.

I don't know, I've never met anybody with this name, probably that's why :)

Oh and Jarosław is also modern. I know few Jareks in my age.

Yeah? Well then, maybe you're right :) I guess I don't pay much attention to which traditional names are used.
And what do you think about Sławomir? I know at least one Sławek (he's 31).
zetigrek
3 Nov 2010 #128
No but it's also not an oldfashioned name (like Władysław or Zdzisław)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
6 Nov 2010 #129
It's all subjective but one name now popular in Poland that makes me smile is Oliwka. Reminds me of the olive in a martini and makes me thristy every time I hear it.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
7 Nov 2010 #130
Lutek, Tosiek, Teofil
Crow 148 | 9,285
7 Nov 2010 #131
Would it be Piotr, Crow? There is Pyotr in Russian and likely a Balkan equivalent, right?

Pyotr? Yes, there is Russian equivalent

In Serbia we have just Christian Petar. In German it sound Peter.

Bronisław

Radosław

in Serbia those are... Branislav and Radoslav. So, same as in Poland

Jarosław

modern day Serbs don`t use name of Jaroslav but i heard that local Voivodina (Serbian Northern province) Slovaks actively using this name.

Polish Slavic names usually end with "-sław".

its also usual among Serbs

for example, in Serbian you have Vladislav name but also Vladimir

Polish Slavic names end also with "-mir" and "-mił": Sławomir, Bogumił. There are also names like Zbigniew, Bogdan, etc.

`-mir` is usual among Serbs, too.

There are also name such are:

Bogdan- one who is given by God
Danilo- one who enlightening the day
Miloš (read as Milosh)- one who is gently/dear
Dušan (read as Dushan)- one with the deep soul
harogutthecat 2 | 4
12 Jul 2011 #132
My son is called Dominik Adam then his english surname............... So when it is said it is pronounced the same by english people and no one is any the wiser untill they see it written or hear his mother call him...
MinaD 1 | 25
6 Mar 2012 #133
Merged: Polish Names?

Hallo all :)
Im looking for typical (and pretty) Polish boys and girls names :)
Ones that arent too difficult to say if possible!
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,844
6 Mar 2012 #135
or as we used to say back in the day...
Danuta Danuta,
With a big hooter.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
6 Mar 2012 #136
Danuta Danuta,
With a big hooter.

Is she a friend of tania Tanya z Astrakhanie?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,844
6 Mar 2012 #137
oh yes I used to see them around together all the time down at the chip shop....
Odolan - | 1
6 May 2014 #138
Piotr is not Slavic name it's Bible name, in english: Peter
the most popular slavic names in Poland are:
Stanisław - the one that become famous
Kazimierz - destroyer of peace
Lech - cunning one
Jarosław - famous for his strength
Przemysław - full of virtues
Radosław - famous for his good advice
Władysław - glorious ruler

my nick is also a Slavic name
Odolan - vanquisher
Nickidewbear 23 | 584
7 May 2014 #139
Lutek, Tosiek, Teofil

Isn't Teofil from the Greek and Latin "Teofilus?"

Danilo- one who enlightening the day

It's not the Polish for "Dani'el"?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
20 Jul 2015 #140
Merged: Polish first/given/Christian names

en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Polish_given_names

This list of Polish first names may be fo interest to some. It includes pet forms as well as English equivalents where they exist.
Polsyr 6 | 769
20 Jul 2015 #141
Thank you - this is interesting and handy.
NocyMrok
14 Jan 2016 #142
My name is Zbigniew. :) Love it. So Polish :) Additionally my surname includes lots of sz and cz. Face of a foreigner trying to spell them is priceless :)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
14 Jan 2016 #143
Zbigniew.

America's best-known Zbigniew is Brzeziński. Many have called him Zbig but his surname usually comes out sounding like Brazinski rather than the proper Bzhezheenski.
flight
23 Jun 2016 #144
Merged: How common are the names Karina and Kamila in Poland?

How common are the names Karina and Kamila in Poland? How often do you run into girls with these names?
AnneM
4 Aug 2016 #145
I'm writing a novel, too, with a chapter set in Polish-American Queens in the Post-WWII era, including likely first names for characters between 10 and 25 years of age.

Thanks!

Oops, I meant: I would love information about family life in Polish-American Queens during the post-war years, including likely first names for young people between 10 and 25 years of age.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
6 Aug 2016 #146
Stanley, Walter, Mitchell, John, Andrew, Dennis, Michael, Thomas, Casimir, Gregory, Edward,
Mary, Wanda, Anne, Helen, Victoria, Margaret, Gloria, Angela, Beatrice, Stella, Christine
Poleboy765 - | 66
8 Aug 2016 #147
My grandfather's name is Chester. You might say it's old fashioned though.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
8 Aug 2016 #148
Chester

In the US Polonia Chester was the traditional replacement for Czesław on a sound-similar basis. Similarly those baptised Mieczysław became Mitchell. Władysław > Walter, Stanisław > Stanley.
Poleboy765 - | 66
8 Aug 2016 #149
Yes. I'm not sure why it's Chester, possibly because our family because our family is heavily Catholic. He was born in Poland. Never asked my great grandparents why the name is that way as they are dead. He came over in 1938. He immigrated to Chicago. Monika is a name I really like, too.
pawian 178 | 15,547
7 Feb 2020 #150
I just read sb in Katowice named their baby Witcher. Nice.
eska.pl/slaskie/w-katowicach-urodzil-sie-wiedzmin-ale-tez-merida-horyw-i-malina-takie-imiona-nadawano-dzieciom-w-2019-roku-aa-qtii-GzTH-NNos.html

The registration office rejected requests for following names:
Joint,
Koka,
Pipa,
Nutella,
Rambo,
Nirvana,
Batman.


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