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Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland? Which non-Polish foods are slowly gaining popularity?


Crow 137 | 7,998
5 Feb 2020 #61
With Serbian food Poles will only expand. Bodily and territorial.
jackrussel
5 Feb 2020 #62
Shopska is very tasty (one of the few dishes of ours I actually love). In fact it's named after the region around our capital city Sofia.

DominicB, but what about Polish students in the UK? They're very likely to experiment imo, you know young ppl experimemt a lot. I know I did in NL. ;) Honestly I don't think anyone expects culinary curiosity out of gasterbeiters (they're too overworked and abused like cattle to have desire for anything but bread and cheese at the end of the day). Heck I'm too tired after just an 8 hr work day to cook and many of them work 9 to 12 hours.
Guest
6 Feb 2020 #63
Polish students in the UK? They're very likely to experiment imo, you know young ppl experimemt a lot. I know I did in NL. ;)

Funny you should say that. I sponsored a young Pole through his studies in London, and when he finished his masters, he got a job for the Ministry of Cybersecurity. I still send him a good chunk of money every month SPECIFICALLY so that he has no excuse nor to try any new food he comes across. I've spent countless hours looking for good, but inexpensive, restaurants for him to to try.

I even spent a month in London myself on a culinary vacation last May and introduced him to tons of new foods. (I currently live in a culinary black hole, so the vacation was desperately needed). And I'm planning to take him on another month-long culinary adventure in Puebla, Mexico next year.

I've made a real foodie out of him. But he had two things that few Polish students have: someone to kick their butt and force them out of their comfort zone, and cash enough to experiment. In this case, cash earmarked specifically for experimenting. Without that, it's bread and cheese at the end of the day, as you said.
DominicB - | 2,701
6 Feb 2020 #64
@jackrussel

The above post was from me. Forgot to log in.
mafketis 23 | 7,827
6 Feb 2020 #65
Shopska is very tasty (one of the few dishes of ours I actually love).

I like a lot of Bulgarian food but Bulgarian versions of dishes shared with Greeks and/or Turks always seem to be... heavier.

Not as heavy as Slovenian (maybe I just didn't know what to order, but while tasty, every Slovenian meal I had was like a cannonball straight in the gut....
pawian 163 | 10,429
6 Feb 2020 #66
Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland?

Toasted bread? Coz Poles prefer their bread untoasted.
Crow 137 | 7,998
6 Feb 2020 #67
When strangers from western Europe come to EXIT music fest and see this kind of Serbian bread they eat and cry >>>

s

s

s
pawian 163 | 10,429
6 Feb 2020 #68
they eat and cry >>>

I know a different saying: The German was crying when he sold his car.
Vesko Vukovic 1 | 208
9 Feb 2020 #69
I think their biggest asset is how they run the place- the way they treat their customers plus the atmosphere

Do they have live music in those restaurants in Warsaw to go along with the dinner, something like this?

youtu.be/sD_hl_HS_h4

[youtu.be/-XLO-Iq4Lx4

;)
gumishu 11 | 5,127
9 Feb 2020 #70
I like a lot of Bulgarian food but Bulgarian

- I heard golumbki (aka gołąbki) are essentially greek dolmas - the thing is dolmas are made with vine leaves and not cabbage leaves and it is the cabbage leaves that give golumbki its characteristic taste
kaprys 2 | 2,124
9 Feb 2020 #71
I've had something similar in Bulgaria, too but they were smaller and wrapped into vine (?) leaves.
mafketis 23 | 7,827
9 Feb 2020 #72
- I heard golumbki (aka gołąbki) are essentially greek dolmas -

originally turkish... or even further east...

in Bulgaria i've mainly had vegetarian versions which are a little blander...

in romania they make it with pickled cabbage (the pickle whole cabbage leaves or even whole cabbages) to mimic the tart taste of grape leaves... in Hungary they bake it with sauerkraut for the same reason... (and they're much bigger than gołąbki...)

by the time you get all the way up to poland the tartness has disappeared

Similarly I think traditional village kotlet mielony (which are small) are probably a northern version of Turkish kofta.
OP NieNazwany
9 Feb 2020 #73
Are there any Polish-origin foods that are famously disliked/unpopular in Poland? Another nation's example is Scotland's national dish, Haggis, which is hugely disliked by almost half Scotland's population (and is even illegal to export to USA)
gumishu 11 | 5,127
10 Feb 2020 #74
I can't imagine something along the lines of golumbki with sour cabbage to be honest
mafketis 23 | 7,827
10 Feb 2020 #75
very yummy... my favorite are maybe Hungarian though, very big, spicy paprika sauce and a big pile of sour cream... and they often serve it with extra sausage or boczek because who need arteries?

cabbage
Crow 137 | 7,998
10 Feb 2020 #76
Bulgarian food

Hungarian

I teased both cuisines and I founded how is Serbian cuisine most balanced. Bulgarians put too much spices, especially mint. Greeks doing same- too much exotic plants. Hungarians often put too much cayenne pepper. So, how to give you a picture...., if you want to give food to a child, you would give it a Serbian food. Not Bulgarian, not Hungarian, not Greek. At the same time, as an adult you also can enjoy Serbian food.

Though, not that all those cuisines aren`t good. They are testy. But its the question of balance. Digestion and health.
Spike31 2 | 1,163
10 Feb 2020 #77
There are restaurants in Warsaw where you can listen to live piano music, Chopin mostly, while eating, drinking and digesting ;-)
Lenka 3 | 1,932
10 Feb 2020 #78
@Mad
I think Hungarian would be my choosing from the ones listed ( after Polish of course :P ). Makes me hungry just thinking about it. Have to make myself some Leczo :)


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