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Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland? Which non-Polish foods are slowly gaining popularity?


pawian 163 | 10,429
2 Feb 2020 #31
Go to Hungary, the former Yugoslavia, Greece, Spain and Italy and it is more exciting cuisine..

Now it occured to me it is a result of a warmer climate. Hungarians have always been able to grow pepper, mild and hot, while Poles haven`t. Northern countries are doomed to have bland cuisine due to their climate.
mafketis 23 | 7,827
2 Feb 2020 #32
Subtle not bland... well made Polish dishes are full of flavor just not spiciness...
pawian 163 | 10,429
2 Feb 2020 #33
But that`s not enough for Milo. He likes it hot. :)

Please stick to the topic
OP NieNazwany
3 Feb 2020 #34
How about Christmas fruitcake? (which in USA/Canada is famously disliked/unpopular, to the point of being ridiculed) Does Poland also have a similar fruitcake at Christmas, and is theirs also ridiculed nationwide? Which foods in Poland are famously disliked/unpopular, to the point of being ridiculed nationwide?
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
3 Feb 2020 #35
Just for fun, here is my personal comparison of Polish cuisine compared to British;

Soups - PL 2 UK 1
Steak/Beef Dishes- PL 0 UK 2
Lamb dishes - PL 0 UK 2
Pork dishes - PL 3 UK 2
Chicken Dishes - PL 2 UK 2
Sausages and cured meats - PL 3 UK 1
Cakes PL 3 UK 1
Desserts PL 2 UK 2
Total -
Bonus Points;
PL - Bigos,Pierogi = +2
UK - Fish and Chips, Curry = +2

FINAL SCORE - PL 17 UK 15
cms neuf - | 1,285
3 Feb 2020 #36
But what about the all important bank holiday games ?

Easter - Poland just ahead, biala kielbasa a narrow winner over hot cross buns.
Christmas - an easy victory for the UK !
pawian 163 | 10,429
3 Feb 2020 #37
Just for fun, here is my personal comparison of Polish cuisine compared to British;

Funny. I tend to agree with it. :)

Christmas - an easy victory for the UK !

Not all Poles eat carp at Christmas. :))
cms neuf - | 1,285
3 Feb 2020 #38
Yeah - 25th is fine. It wigilia that I don't like - though we normally have salmon and prawns plus a few dishes of sledz and karp for the old folk if they want them.
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
3 Feb 2020 #39
Yes, I agree with you.

Not all Poles eat carp at Christmas. :))

My family used to eat herring........... yuk!
pawian 163 | 10,429
3 Feb 2020 #40
though we normally have salmon and prawns plus a few dishes of sledz and karp

Wow, I never thought of prawns for Supper! I am too traditional, I am afraid. But I will order them this year. :)
mafketis 23 | 7,827
3 Feb 2020 #41
My family used to eat herring........... yuk!

There are some ways of preparing it that are fine, I know someone that does herring in sour cream infused with garlic paste or horseradish... and the simple version of rinse and dry it, chop it up with raw onion salt and pepper in a jar with oil for a few days is very nice.

On the other hand I could happily live the rest of my life with nary another rolmops and die happily....

Christmas fruitcake? (which in USA/Canada is famously disliked/unpopular

No real equivalent, the closest equivalent to fruitcake is keks (which is pretty different) and it isn't especially disliked...

My personal nominee for "unwanted holiday 'delicacy'" might by kutia... the times I've had it... it seems more like festive dish created for a horse than for people...

polish fruit cake
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
3 Feb 2020 #42
There are some ways of preparing it that are fine,

Each to their own tastes.... I hate herring whichever way you prepare it.
My families method, I think, was doused in oil and vinegar and served with raw slices of onion.
I still enjoy raw onion, but the fish makes me want to throw up......
OP NieNazwany
4 Feb 2020 #43
Any other foods in Poland that are ridiculed nationwide? In USA, there's even a fruitcake-tossing competition
mafketis 23 | 7,827
4 Feb 2020 #44
foods in Poland that are ridiculed nationwide?

Not that I can think of, 45 years of communism, including ration cards tends to make people not want to waste food...
jackrussel
4 Feb 2020 #45
Just a feww recommendations to Poles as a fellow Slav:

1. Satay, Nasi and Bami goreng. Indonesian and Thai food is great!
Ask any Pole working in the Netherlands, I bet they prefer it to "white" Dutch cuisine.

2. Speaking of which it's not all bad: bitterballen, frikandel and fries with Joppie sace are great

3. Tikka Masala - ask Poles living in the UK.

Imo these are miles better than typical kebab and Turkish/Arab fare.
Lenka 3 | 1,932
4 Feb 2020 #46
I will take a good kebab over tikka masala every time. I still can't believe I didn't have one last time I went to Berlin (the gradation of kebab is UK the worst, Poland ok and Germany- the best by miles)

As to the rest- I wouldn't know.
jackrussel
4 Feb 2020 #47
Kebab is too glutinous for me and prone to leaking sauce lol, I prefer kapsalon (a kebab-like dish without the pita bread but with french fries. Also very popular in the Netherlands.

Joppie sauce is... I can't even describe it's taste. Heavenly! I thought I'll never like any sauce on french fries but it changed my mind. It's tooo oily though!

Bitterballen and frikandel are both served with drinks like beer in bars. Here we just have peanuts, fried fish (sprouts) in breading, or other nuts.
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
4 Feb 2020 #48
I will take a good kebab over tikka masala every time

Me too.

the gradation of kebab is UK the worst, Poland ok and Germany- the best by miles

Uk kebabs, you have to know where to go.
Central north London where many Greeks and Turks live you get the best kebabs.
German are very good too, so much so that there is now a German kebab chain in London.
As for Tikka Masala, that is Anglo Indian cuisine, you won't find it in India.
Proper Indian or Pakistani cuisine is excellent, along with Sri Lankan ( which is slightly different and even spicier than Indian).
jackrussel
5 Feb 2020 #49
Yeah but you can find a kebab place everywhere. Thai and Indonesian food is less overexposed, so there's perhaps a larger niche. As for desire, I bet most Eastern Europeans in the Netherlands survive on exotic takeaway. So Poles coming back from the NL would dig it.
Crow 137 | 7,998
5 Feb 2020 #50
Go to Hungary, the former Yugoslavia, Greece, Spain and Italy and it is more exciting cuisine..

How goes `pljeskavica` in Poland? Poles and Polke eat?
DominicB - | 2,701
5 Feb 2020 #51
As for desire, I bet most Eastern Europeans in the Netherlands survive on exotic takeaway.

You would think, but that is not the case. I've had dozens of Polish friends and students go to work in the Netherlands, and told them specifically to try Indonesian food, particularly rijsttafel. None did. In fact, they did very little eating out at all, surviving entirely on supermarket food. Especially bread and cold cuts. They are there to make money to bring back to Poland, and eating out works against that. Even cheap takeout. Sampling the local food, whether native or exotic, is very low on the priority list.

As a foodie evangelist, I have to say that Poles are particularly difficult to convert to the foodie faith. I've had a few stunning successes, and I've met some avid Polish foodies, some from surprising quarters, but most Poles are quite reluctant to budge from their comfort zone.

Sadly, a lot of the reluctance has to do with cost. Trying an unknown food means risking that you will end up with something you don't like and have to throw away. Particularly in a restaurant setting in the West, where food is extravagantly expensive in relation to back home. Better to stick with the tried and true.
cms neuf - | 1,285
5 Feb 2020 #52
There are a few Yugoslav places in Warsaw serving pleskavica and other Balkan stuff - the standard probably not up to what you are used to but OK for filling a hole. There was a place on Chmielna selling cevapcici and other stuff but I am not sure if it is still there.

A Croat guy has a few restaurants called Dubrovnik and started to set up a few outside Warsaw - the service is good, the food is filling and the beer and wine is excellent value there so it is often quite busy. It is one place I go in central Warsaw if I want to eat something "known".
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
5 Feb 2020 #53
pljeskavica

I would eat it.

but most Poles are quite reluctant to budge from their comfort zone.

Very true.
Crow 137 | 7,998
5 Feb 2020 #54
I would eat it.

Don`t say you didn`t eat already?
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
5 Feb 2020 #55
I am afraid not.
But in general I find most cuisine from the former Yugoslavia very appetising.
Lenka 3 | 1,932
5 Feb 2020 #56
Central north London where many Greeks and Turks live you get the best kebabs.

I can easily believe it- after all it's the capital city but generally the standard is low with ready made sauces.
All the places I visited in Poland and Germany had their own recipes with great salads.

But in general I find most cuisine from the former Yugoslavia very appetising.

The food is good but I think their biggest asset is how they run the place- the way they treat their customers plus the atmosphere- great place to spend a nice e evening
Crow 137 | 7,998
5 Feb 2020 #57
their biggest asset is how they run the place

But of course. Serbians are open minded and hospitable people, morale giants. And Poles are here especially venerated because of Zawisha the black and all Poles done for our liberation from Turks. Polke are venerated even more. Dinaric man gets inspiration to fascinate Polka and be sure that Dinaric man as most robust example of White male, have something to offer.

I am afraid not.

Try beef broth/soup and then baked lamb and goat. Baked potato with that. Let it swim in vine. And as aperitif take rakija- plum.
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
5 Feb 2020 #58
Don't.
You are making me hungry.
Crow 137 | 7,998
5 Feb 2020 #59
Man, you really vested your life if don`t try that.

And I forgot. Take cabbage salad with meat. Its exceptional combination. But instead, I would also suggest you to taste Shopska or Serbian salad. Shopska is tomato, cucumbers, raw or roasted peppers, onion, parsley, salt, lemon juice or vinegar, oil and fatty salty cheese. Serbian salad is all same as Shopska but pepper is raw- cayenne pepper and without cheese.

And yes, rakija also can be quince (dunja) or pear.

d

Dunja
Miloslaw 6 | 3,239
5 Feb 2020 #60
Hey Crow!

I prefer you when you talk about food rather than all the other stuff!


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