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Which Polish first names are considered unpopular / obsolete in Poland?


Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #1
...and are any of those names starting to make a comeback of sorts, in modern Polish society?
Nathans
25 Mar 2019  #2
There are quite a few, for example all related to "Polish kings" or saints, like:

Krzesimir
Bronisław
Mieszko
Honorata
Bożydar
Czesław
Genowefa
Ludosława
Kazimierz
Wawrzyniec
Marzanna
Zdzisław
Dobromir
Bolesław
Feliks
Włodzimerz
Klemens
Waldemar

Some of them make a comeback indeed.
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #3
Which Polish first names are also considered "unfashionable" in Poland? (for example, are there any Polish first names with possible "negative connotations", such as first names which may be misheard as bizarre and/or offensive words)? One example is the female first name "Hortense", which is of French language origin
Shitonya Brits
25 Mar 2019  #4
There are many internet sources which tell its readers which names are popular at the moment.

Here is one: dziennikzachodni.pl/najpopularniejsze-imiona-w-polsce-wykaz-imion-julek-i-antosiow-mamy-najwiecej-imie-maja-zyskuje-na-popularnosci/ar/12607066

There are many names and they are often separated in rank by only a couple of digits.

Whatever name is considered "popular" this year won't be in a few years time anyway.

So why follow the herd?

You should consider names which are meaningful and not ones which are considered "fashionable".

For example, you could research your family tree then find a unique name of an ancestor which is no longer widely used today.
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #5
You should consider names which are meaningful and not ones which are considered "fashionable".

I'm just curious about which Polish names are considered unpopular/obsolete and/or "unfashionable" in Poland (as opposed to "not trendy")...specifically, unfashionable due to possible "negative connotations" (for example, Polish first names that are derived from bizarre and/or offensive Polish words, and so those names may be considered "unfashionable" just for that reason alone).
Nathans
25 Mar 2019  #6
How about "Dzidosława" (especially the short versions: Dzidka or Dzida have sort of negative sexual / offensive connotation).
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #7
Dzidosława

LOL "Dzidosława", I think recognize the "nicknames". Are there any other Polish first names you can think of that may possibly be misheard and/or misread as a bizarre and/or offensive Polish words? Now that I think about it, I do remember someone from Poland telling me that some Polish surnames are actually derived from Polish words for animals/foods/objects, but unfortunately I forgot to ask if Polish first names also derived
Januszz
25 Mar 2019  #8
Three more suggestions:

- Tekla (bad association from a cartoon - spider "Tekla"),
- Genowefa (a subject to some mainstream jokes in Poland - "Genowefa Pigwa"),
- Janusz (related to some bad Polish politician/s who like to screw things up - "Janusze interesu")
Lyzko 22 | 6,531
25 Mar 2019  #9
I knew a "Thekla" once from the Cologne area (German, not Polish), only she spelled hers with an "h"!
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #10
Thanks everyone for your replies.

Another question I have regarding Polish names: What are the Polish equivalents of "NoName"-type names, for example "John Doe"/"Jane Doe"/"John Roe"/"Jane Roe"? My educated guesses would be "Jan(ina) Kowalsk(i or a)" and "Jan(ina) Nowak".

And what are the Polish equivalents of "Elm Street"/"Pine Street"/"Main Street", "AnyTown", AnyDistrict", "AnyRegion", "AnyCountry"? (I've heard the fictional name "Ruritania" used in USA and Canada and maybe used in other countries, being equivalent to "AnyCountry").

And the Polish equivalent of a "NoName" mailing address and telephone number? In USA & Canada, it would be something like "John or Jane Doe, 1 Pine St or Main St, AnyTown USA, 00000" and "Canada A0B 1B2". "NoName" phone numbers in USA and Canada would have 3-digit area codes starting with 0 or 1, followed by 7-digit phone numbers starting with 555-.

Examples: (012)555-1234 and (112)555-1234
cms neuf - | 903
25 Mar 2019  #11
For Main Street then if I am going to a small town and want to find the center I normally put Pilsudskiego in my GPS and it will always be either the town square or one of the main streets. Other small town street names you get everywhere Koscielna, Dworcowa, Targowa (church st, station st, market st) or named after writers / composers - Slowackiego, Paderewskiego, Sienkiewicza, Moniuszki etc.
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #12
To get back on topic, I noticed Polish female first names ending in "-sława" seem to be almost nonexistent for Polish women who are younger than middle-aged...and I also noticed those names don't seem to be making a comeback nowadays. And another question, is it legal in Poland to give a newborn baby girl a non-Polish first name that doesn't end with letter "a", but is traditionally used as a "female-only" first name outside Poland? (If the first name in question doesn't have a Polish variation?) Examples: Colleen, Heather, Jennifer, Ruth, etc.
jon357 63 | 14,122
25 Mar 2019  #14
And Seweryn, Gniewomir, Ildefons...
Lyzko 22 | 6,531
25 Mar 2019  #15
What about Semyon Jakub or Bogdan?
OP Lri 4 | 39
25 Mar 2019  #16
I've seen young (at least teenage years) Polish males names Szymon and Jakub (although most of the Jakubs call themselves "Kuba" instead), but I don't think I've ever seen a Bogdan man who is younger than middle-aged...I've also never seen a "-sława" woman who's younger than middle-aged..
Lyzko 22 | 6,531
25 Mar 2019  #17
Interesting, thanks Lri!
Shitonya Brits
25 Mar 2019  #18
I've seen young (at least teenage years) Polish males names Szymon and Jakub

These aren't genuinely Polish names. They are Jewish names.

They aren't "cool", "youthful", or "modern" names either.

Both are older than dirt; that's how obsolete they are.

They also have very negative connotations.

First, there is way too much polarising religious baggage associated with these two names.

The first thing that comes to mind are old, barrel-shaped, black-clad rabbis shuffling along with big scraggly beards and even bigger funny hats that are never in fashion.

The use of these names is a very big problem especially in an ever increasingly secular world; particularly among the young of today who see religion as oppressive, divisive and irrelevant.

Second, there are also many old, thuggish, Zionist politicians in Israel with these names. The same ones who spew fascist, racist hatred like saying openly that "Israel isn't for all of its citizens", "Jerusalem is only for Jews", and who also build walls around Israel and call refugees "infiltrators" amid baying crowds of elderly Israelis demanding their expulsion.

The use of these names is an even bigger problem especially in an ever increasingly globalised world; particularly among the young of today who are informed and committed to diversity, inclusion and respect.

And the problems with these names don't stop there!

Their origins show they are actually cartoonish nicknames.

In the case of the name Szymon, the Jews derived the name (because of no originality on their part and need to culturally appropriate) from a Greek word meaning "flat-nosed".

The name Jakub actually means "heel" as in the rear, underside part of the foot.
Lyzko 22 | 6,531
25 Mar 2019  #19
Nonetheless, countless Polish males are named Jakub and Szymon, again, non-Jewish Poles to be sure:-)
Shitonya Brits
25 Mar 2019  #20
But would they have given and kept these names had they known the true origins of these names?

No they wouldn't.

These names only spread in Europe because the lives of Christian saints were used as advertising to spread this religion. Many priests discourage or even forced parents to choose such names for their children.

The sales tactics were on the good deeds done by the ancient bearers of these names. Never because the names they bore were actually satirical.

Most parents today just follow the herd and the advertising for these names has only changed models.

It only takes one pop singer with a one-hit wonder or a football player who make a winning goal with these names for parents to go wild and burden their children with them.

And never realising that they are taking part in one of the longest running jokes in history.
Miloslaw 6 | 2,024
25 Mar 2019  #21
You are a weird one......I love this last post of yours.
pawian 159 | 9,477
26 Mar 2019  #22
These aren't genuinely Polish names. They are Jewish names.

Yes, they are Jewish by origin. So what? None of my students named Szymon or Jakub have ever experienced hostile reactions from their peers because of their first name. So, stop blowing it into a problem that doesn`t really exist. Have you ever thought of consulting anyone about this antisemitic obsession of yours? ):

.I love this last post of yours.

That`s sad because it means you are becoming infected with obsessions. :)
Jaskier
26 Mar 2019  #23
None of my students named Szymon or Jakub have ever experienced hostile reactions

It would be weird if they did as Jakub is one of the most popular names given to babies in Poland for few years now.

My son has two names with Jewish origin and somehow we are all fine...
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 462
26 Mar 2019  #24
"Bożydar"

youtu.be/ynfgttJP-Bc

(sorrry I couldn't resist)
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 462
26 Mar 2019  #25
OK, what's abaut Brajan, Kierjan, Rajan or Dżesika. how cool are those!
pawian 159 | 9,477
26 Mar 2019  #26
It would be weird if they did as Jakub is one of the most popular names given to babies in Poland for few years now.

Poles hear those names during every Sunday mass. :) And whatever the priest says, it is holy to many Catholics here. :):)
One must be completely ignorant of Polish ways to suggest that Jewish names are obsolete!
delphiandomine 83 | 17,625
26 Mar 2019  #27
One must be completely ignorant of Polish ways

Well, I think you're onto something here...
mafketis 20 | 7,169
26 Mar 2019  #28
English-y names were popular a few years ago but more among the lower classes which meant that middle class and higher avoided names like Kewin, Samanta or Wanessa like the plague...
pawian 159 | 9,477
26 Mar 2019  #29
OK, what's abaut Brajan, Kierjan, Rajan or Dżesika. how cool are those!

I have never heard that Kierjan. What is it?

Well, I think you're onto something here...

Some guys are still learning about Poland. Let`s be patient. :)

but more among the lower classes which meant that middle class and higher avoided names.

Yes, indeed. When my female teacher colleagues have had babies in recent years, they always reacted indignantly when I suggested giving them those English names.
Miloslaw 6 | 2,024
26 Mar 2019  #30
There are quite a few names of Polish people I know that sound very weird and old fashioned in English.
Especially some female names,all the women I know with these names are under 40,so not that long ago;
Edyta
Marta,
Jadwiga
Genowefa
Agata
Beata

And for the boys,how about Miloslaw? :-)


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