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Polish cakes made in Poland


jon357 74 | 22,396
9 May 2024 #61
All unexceptional and available in pretty well every country.

I used to buy Maltanki sometimes. They were pleasant enough albeit austere.
mafketis 37 | 10,852
9 May 2024 #62
I like simple cookies (like Danish butter cookies) and also like things like Petit Beure
Atch 20 | 4,154
10 May 2024 #63
Polish sponge cakes/biszkopty

To me they're what we in the Isles would call 'trifle sponges' and we would never eat them as a biscuit. Ours are oblong in shape and they're used for making certain kinds of cakes or desserts like trifle especially because they soak up sherry or other liquid very well. Not a fan of herbatniki either. They are mostly too sweet and not very good for dunking! I know, they're supposed to be crispy but dunking is one of life's great pleasures.

[quote=jon357]At home, it was mostly Rich Tea or 'Nice" [/!quote]
Same here. Rich Tea was considered 'a plain biscuit' but I liked them. I still do. Very comforting with a cup of tea if you have a headache or have had an upset tummy. You can get Rich Tea fingers in Dealz. Not as satisfying as the proper round ones but any old port in a storm! Nice were very sugary and old ladies seemed to love them. I remember them being served to old lady visitors with a glass of sherry.

Did you have Lincoln Creams in the UK? I really liked those. They were another sweeter plain biscuit considered suitable for the weekday biscuit tin. We only had 'sweet' biscuits with cream fillings on Sundays.

The only biccie that I truly detested was Marietta. No greater disappointment as a child than going visiting with your mother, out comes the biscuit tin and you're offered a Marietta :( I suppose Arrowroot were worse but they never really caught on in Ireland.
jon357 74 | 22,396
10 May 2024 #64
Ours are oblong in shape and they're used for making certain kinds of cakes or desserts like trifle

I think they're sometimes called boudoir biscuits. For trifles or for people so infirm and toothless that they can't manage wafers.

herbatniki

Sort of 'civil service' biscuits. When I worked at the Legal Aid Board back in pre-computer days when there was still a tea lady who called at each floor in turn twice a day there were always that sort of biscuits. Hobnobs eventually took over in offices.

Lincoln Creams in the UK?

I've never seen them. There were also Gypsy Creams which people mention but I'm not sure what they are.

A biscuit I don't like is Goosnargh Cakes, a Lancashire thing. Very plain with caraway seeds in.
Alien 21 | 5,197
10 May 2024 #65
proper round ones

I buy round sponge cakes in the Czech Republic. Interestingly, sometimes they are of Polish production.

Did you have Lincoln Creams in the UK? I

On our holidays in England, Mrs. Alien and I always went for tea for two and Eccles cakes. They were delicious. We didn't bring sweets back from our holidays on the islands.
jon357 74 | 22,396
10 May 2024 #66
sponge cakes

When I first moved to PL I was amused to see a brand of cakes labelled as "keks". Where I'm from, the word keks means underpants.
Alien 21 | 5,197
10 May 2024 #67
keks

This word is certainly an Anglicanism but commonly used in Polish.
mafketis 37 | 10,852
10 May 2024 #68
a brand of cakes labelled as "keks".

Not a brand, but a kind of cake. Sort of a light fruitcake.

I thought the meaning in Britain (as told to me be a northerner) was a lot worse than underpants....

But I like keks more than most fruitcake two different bakeries within walking distance make very nice ones.

mostly too sweet and not very good for dunking! I

As an inveterate dunker I remember being told (by a fellow American who'd been here longer) that I probably shouldn't dunk when around Polish people. I don't know if it's more acceptable now.

Best for dunking are churros, of course. Though I prefer them with coffee over hot chocolate...
Atch 20 | 4,154
10 May 2024 #69
a lot worse than underpants....

No you're thinking of cack which means sh*t. There's also an expression, to be 'cack-handed' which means doing things badly, especially manual tasks.

there was still a tea lady who called at each floor in turn twice a day

I also worked in a place in London which shall remain nameless where we had two tea ladies who came morning and afternoons with the trolley. They were called Lil and Jean :) and they kept tight control of the biscuit tin. Jean was marginally less scary than Lil. It was Rich Tea and Digestives usually but occasionally there may have been Hob Nobs. We weren't allowed to have a kettle in the actual office space so if you wanted a cup of tea outside the official times, you had to go the kitchen and request one which meant bearding Lil and Jean in their den. Requests for tea received at best a frosty reception and at worst, one was scolded and harrangued throught the tea-making process. Happy memories!

Eccles cakes.

Oh yes, now they're very nice. Lovely flaky pastry.

@Jon, here are the Lincoln Creams, a Jacobs biscuit - I don't remember Gypsy Creams but they had cream in the middle and they were just too sweet for my taste.



jon357 74 | 22,396
10 May 2024 #70
cack

Quite.

Interestingly men's knickers are called kecks in Sheffield, Rotherham, Leeds but down the road in Doncaster they're called kegs.

Lincoln Creams

I'd try one. Maybe there's a historic connection with Lincoln.
mafketis 37 | 10,852
10 May 2024 #71
There's also an expression, to be 'cack-handed'

I use that expression frequently...

Actually this guy said 'keks' (or... kecks I I guess) was specifically a way of referring to a dingleberry or dingleberries (you can look that up on your own and thank me later).

But he was very weird... so.... he may have been deluded or making stuff up.
jon357 74 | 22,396
11 May 2024 #72
dingleberries

People say that in Yorkshire too.

I probably shouldn't dunk when around Polish people. I don't know if it's more acceptable now.

I do and don't give a damn if they look askance.


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