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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


OP pawian 159 | 9,553
12 May 2011  #121
in Krk called flying rats...

Never heard of it before.

pawian, don't tell me you eat that too....

Well, actually we love our urban poultry. We never deprive them of their life, only collect dead ones and then cook. :):):)
Cardno85 31 | 976
12 May 2011  #122
Well, actually we love our urban poultry. We never deprive them of their life, only collect dead ones and then cook.

I am a big fan of pigeon myself, but I would never eat urban pigeon, even more so if I hadn't killed it myself. The reason they are called flying rats in so many places is because they nest in urban rooftops and other areas which are not exactly clean. They eat god-knows what and they have god knows how many diseases.

Wood pigeons are where it's at!
RainbowFairy - | 8
20 May 2011  #123
I think polish food tastes like rat droppings....
Seanus 15 | 19,706
20 May 2011  #124
I'm not familiar with rat droppings. Any good? ;)
guesswho 4 | 1,289
20 May 2011  #125
What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?

The truth about Polish foods is that most of it tastes better than what it looks like.
One would have to force me to eat flaki though, lol
wildrover 98 | 4,452
20 May 2011  #126
There is some Polish food that is wonderfull , some i would not eat with a gun to my head...

Mainly , the stuff i won,t eat in Poland , is the stuff i would not eat back home in the UK...

There is some stuff in jars in the Biedronka that looks like its been stolen from an autopsy...!

Here in Poland i eat mushrooms and tomatoes , never ever touched em back in the UK , so Polish food must be better i guess , more natural , and less water and chemicals...
boletus 30 | 1,366
21 May 2011  #127
A hot summer approaches. It's time for some nice fruit soups. Oh those memories of morello cherry soup, plum soup, blueberry soup...

Soup of the hawthorn - for 6 people. Take three quarters of a liter of dried hawthorn, pour some water to cover the hawthorn, add a roll, cook until mashed, squeeze it through fine filter until only the husks are left. Take half a bottle of wine, 100 grams of sugar, a little bit of cinnamon, add some water, dilute the mash, and bring it to a boil. Serve with biscuits or rusks.

Wild strawberries in milk. Dress and rinse wild strawberries, leave them in colander until dry, place them in a vase adding layers of sugar and pour the milk. Whip the pint of sour cream with sugar until frothy and add it to the soup.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
22 May 2011  #128
The truth about Polish foods is that most of it tastes better than what it looks like.
One would have to force me to eat flaki though, lol

Come on. It is all pure meat. Tastes like octopus, believe me.

f

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pjlandowski 1 | 7
4 Jun 2011  #129
As a guy that has cooked for me 24 years, and a US Army RANGER , I have not seen food that bad since I left the food on the stove after a god drunk.
valpomike 11 | 197
4 Jun 2011  #130
Polish food, most all, is the greatest around. Enjoy it, and give something new to you, a try, you may like it.

Mike
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #131
Mike, whose payroll are you on?

Tripe (flaki) is quite eatable. At least it is edible unlike blowfish (fugu) if not treated. Then again, I was raised on haggis so it's quite easy for me :)
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #132
Tripe (flaki)

omg i tried them twice i felt like vomiting afterwards, shredded cow stomach, eww. Czarnina (duck's blood soup) tastes much better, but again knowing what it is restrains me from consuming it. I believe it's a regional dish Kasubian not Polish in general. There are so many other good Polish dishes besides gołąbki or Ruskie pierogi. Last time i've been to Poland ate some delicious stuffed roasted duck, with potatoes with a creamy wild mushroom sauce.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #133
Oh, Poland is a great country for game birds and quality options to complement them. Mushrooms or mushroom sauce are legendary! Even some wild cherries (czereśnie??) are not out of place as garnish and for eating if you want. Poland also excels with its vast range of side salads. You can eat like a king if you so desire.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #134
Oh, Poland is a great country for game birds and quality options to complement them. Mushrooms or mushroom sauce are legendary!

Especially if the animal is one from some private farm, all natural and the mushroom picked in a forest. Just makes the food taste so good.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #135
Have you tried maślaki mushrooms, Penn? Porcelino ones are the favourite of well-to-do folks but the range is pretty impressive here. I say that as a Scot and we have some good ones too :)

What I like about those options is, as you said, the richness of flavour. Don't get me wrong, standard Polish food can have a distinctive enough flavour but, in relative terms, is on the bland side without salt. A rich meal is a good treat once in a while.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #136
Have you tried maślaki mushrooms, Penn?

Of course i love mushrooms, tried just about every kind podgrzybki, prawdziwki, Kanie, pieczarki.

A rich meal is a good treat once in a while.

True, i'm sure everyone would love to eat organic hormone free meats and veggies that haven't been sprayed with a ton of chemicals and grow in a pile of fertilizer.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #137
Most go down a treat :) :) As I said above, Poles tend to eat them with quality meat or game birds. What would you pair them with in America?

Funny you mention that, Penn. There is a scandal brewing here whereby produce is not washed well enough after spraying them with fertilisers. That's for another thread, though.

Oh, do you get łazanki across in the States?
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
4 Jun 2011  #138
What would you pair them with in America?

You can substitute them for meat if you are a vegetarian because they have a mild meaty flavor. They are good sauted in olive oil with some parmesan cheese. They work well with green beans. Rice. Pasta, so long as there's a sauce and they are cooked. They taste awesome in a buttery sauce, served with baked potatoes or steak.

Anytime you want the hearty flavor, throw in a few mushrooms. They are found in cans of creamed soup, too, or you can make your own with mushrooms and cream.

You can also put them in a salad. They go with so many things.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #139
What would you pair them with in America?

I eat mushrooms Polish style, with for instance cubes of cooked beef and the sauces can be bought in any Polish store. I hardly ever see Americans in general eating mushrooms, supermarkets don't have a wide variety either, unless it's an Asian (Oriental) store, Asians seem to love them.

Oh, do you get łazanki across in the States?

Yes. Polish American stores, some in big Polish communities like NY or Chicago are huge, and you can buy just about anything from Poland from Knorr or Nałęczowianka to furniture.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #140
PP, some good ideas there :) Versatility is one of the beauties of mushrooms :)

Penn, diced beef would be tasty with mushrooms, right enough! How about with ribs (żeberki)? In almost 7 years of having lived in Poland and near a milk bar that serves them, I haven't even tried them yet. A bit silly but there we go. Ribs are good with a sweet and sour sauce but I imagine a mushroom sauce to be decent with them too.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
4 Jun 2011  #141
I've seen an increase in mushroom variety at the local market. Some varieties are expensive, though. People are discovering them more and more.
They taste delicious with chicken which is a popular food at the moment.
Mushroom farming is also popular. People grow them in boxes in their closets. It's cost effective that way.
strzyga 2 | 993
4 Jun 2011  #142
anything from Poland from Knorr

oh dat ist not Polish, dat ist an import from die Deutsche Chemicals Inc... even if they manufacture it here.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #143
How about with ribs (żeberki)? In almost 7 years of having lived in Poland and near a milk bar that serves them, I haven't even tried them yet.

They're ok you haven't missed much. I prefer Ribs American style BBQ. As for a side to them someone introduced me to potatoes and this cheddar cheese, sour cream,dill and garlic all melted together topping. Really good. But that's American food, different thread lol.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #144
And what do you think about cheese and mushroom combinations? Poles like both but I don't see them eaten together. It smacks more of macaroni with a sauce formed from powder in a sachet.
strzyga 2 | 993
4 Jun 2011  #145
Mushroom farming is also popular. People grow them in boxes in their closets.

Have you got boczniaki? They can be grown at home.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleurotus
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #146
And what do you think about cheese and mushroom combinations?

That just sounds like an extended stay on the toilet lol.

boczniaki?

fly agaric?



Seanus 15 | 19,706
4 Jun 2011  #147
When your toilet is a throne..... ;)

Do you eat 'buchty' in the States, Penn?
strzyga 2 | 993
4 Jun 2011  #148
fly agaric?

no, these are reserved for special guests only, like some obnoxious and notorious PF forumers :)
or for the Siberians, they eat them after cooking for some 8 or 9 hours.

Boczniak is Pleurotus, see the link in my post above. Very edible.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
4 Jun 2011  #149
Have you got boczniaki? They can be grown at home.

Those are cool looking!
However, I haven't seen any of those here. I have seen lots of Button Mushrooms. They are popular, so's Portobello. Then there's a type that look like Button Mushrooms, except slightly larger and brown. I don't know their name but I often buy them.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
4 Jun 2011  #150
Do you eat 'buchty' in the States, Penn?

Never had them is the States or in Poland.
Have you tried Parowce in Poland, remember having them in grade school. Dough cooked in water, served with whipped sour cream or diced strawberries mixed with sugar. We ate it for breakfast.

Mix the yeast with milk. Let stand until they grow. Add milk, eggs, sugar and flour, a little salt to taste and knead the dough, let stand until grow. Re-knead, from the dough do the balls or squeeze them with a glass. Hang on for a moment to let it grow. Pour water to a wide, low pan, put gauze on it, tied and boil the water. When the water starts boiling, apply the noodles on a gauze, cover with the bowl or another pot and steam of approx. 7 minutes. Parowce of grandma serve with whipped cream or with strawberries mixed with sugar.

poswojsku.pl/winr/parowce.htm

no, these are reserved for special guests only

Or some uninvited guests, who thought they have a free meal ;)


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