The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / USA, Canada  % width posts: 113

Poles in America: How do you pronounce your Polish surname?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
26 Jun 2010 #1
This question is being directed to Pol-Ams, Pol-Canadians and other Diaspora types who have retained the original spelling of their Polish surname. Do you pronounce it the original Polish way, ie, Zając=zaYUNTS, Wróblewski= vroobLEFFski, Chomiński=

hawMEENski, Jabłoński=yab-WOINski, etc.
or Anglo-mangle it: Zayjack, Roblooski, Chaminski, Jablanski, etc.?
Whichever way, is that how your parents and grandparents pronounced it or have you yourself anglicised the pronunciation? Or maybe revertded to the original Polish pronunciation had been anglicised by a previous geenration?
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
26 Jun 2010 #2
Nothing annoys me more than the ones who can't even pronounce their last name properly, yet claim to be Polish. Adam "An-gee-eff-ski" was a good example of this!
Matowy - | 295
26 Jun 2010 #3
I find it hilarious when Americans can't even say their last name. "Dźan-COW-skee" sounds ridiculous.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
27 Jun 2010 #4
Some Pol-Ams have officially changed the spelling of their Polish surnames name to retain their original pronunciaiton. Common examples:
Hominski (Chomiński)
Dembkowski (Dębkowski)
Yablonski (Jabłoński)
Payonk (Pająk)
Voytkoviak (Wojtkowiak)
sobieski 107 | 2,128
27 Jun 2010 #5
I know in my native Flanders the fact that women's surnames change gramatically - "a" on the end in most cases - at times confuses people in the administration.

But what is think is very confusing is that the fact that women after marriage take their husband's surname - be it gramitacally adjusted -.

Honestly I also do no not understand this. In my country up to the 60's wifes added their husbands' surnames to theirs. But not giving up their own.
beckski 12 | 1,617
27 Jun 2010 #6
wifes added their husbands' surnames to theirs. But not giving up their own.

Most of the women in my family either keep their maiden name after marriage, or hyphenate her surname with his.
sobieski 107 | 2,128
27 Jun 2010 #7
Girls in my company systematically take their husbands' names.
Hamika - | 3
1 Jul 2010 #8
I'm of a Polish matriline, so...
But, I know of a 13 letter name, where only 7 letters remain, with a "rze" changed to "rez."
I imagine they probably pronounce it like American-English.
plk123 8 | 4,150
1 Jul 2010 #9
i pronounce mine in polish, others maybe not so much.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
1 Jul 2010 #10
Depends on the language I am using, in Norwegian I say it with Norwegian (u) not Polish (u,ó)
While in Polish I say it like Poles do :)
Of course it's origins are German so wth ^^

(I hate it when they write down Grundvall, or Grundtval or something close)
Matowy - | 295
1 Jul 2010 #12
Perkovvskee

Per - Like pear, but faster
Kov - Like cough, but faster and with a V sound at the end. This is the syllable where you place the emphasis of the word

Ski - Like the sport

Your profile does say you know Polish, eh...
josh sklodowski
26 Aug 2010 #13
I say Skluh-DOW-skee. I don't like it when other ethnic groups insist that I role my R's or pronounce the Kh's of their names. So, I'm courteous enough to Anglify mine.
trener zolwia 1 | 940
26 Aug 2010 #14
This is courteous of you. Everyone should abide by the norms of the land where they are rather than trying to inflict their manners/ traditions etc on their hosts or insisting to be accommodated.

How would Vojtal be pronounced in Poland?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
26 Aug 2010 #15
How would Vojtal be pronounced in Poland?

Voytal
plk123 8 | 4,150
26 Aug 2010 #16
Voytal

foytal actually but since v is not a polish letter, if your name is of polish descent then it was spelled with a W which is pronounced like a V
trener zolwia 1 | 940
26 Aug 2010 #17
Oops, my mistake. It is spelled with a W.
So would it still be Voytal?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
26 Aug 2010 #18
always use this )
trener zolwia 1 | 940
26 Aug 2010 #19
always use this
:)

Thanks. :)

Hey, what have the Polish against the letter V anyway? Seems a bit discriminatory to me...
pgtx 29 | 3,159
26 Aug 2010 #20
and X!!!
i have never understood what have the English against the letters ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż... such handsome letters...
;)
trener zolwia 1 | 940
26 Aug 2010 #21
Those aren't letters! Somekinda crazy pagan symbols...
nunczka 8 | 458
26 Aug 2010 #22
Its sad, but in todays America, there are very few Polish Americans that understand Polish.

Names have been changed to the meaning in American
Bialek >>>>>white
Czarnikowski>>>> Black
Jaskowiak>>>> Johns
Wisniewski>>> Cherry
Krawczyk>>> Taylor
Tymoteusz 2 | 353
26 Aug 2010 #23
The V and W are transposed as normal. It was written phonetically upon entry and stuck.
Also, the ski-ska thing is long gone.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
26 Aug 2010 #24
A last name is one's most precious possession and deserves respect. Only it's owner can say how it should be pronounced. If someone spells his name Smythe and insists it be pronoucned Jones, so be it!
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
26 Aug 2010 #26
always use this

Yeah, but is that pronounced Ivona, or Iwona? :D

A last name is one's most precious possession and deserves respect. Only it's owner can say how it should be pronounced. If someone spells his name Smythe and insists it be pronoucned Jones, so be it!

orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/raymond.htm

:D
trener zolwia 1 | 940
26 Aug 2010 #27
Voytal

since v is not a polish letter

The V and W are transposed as normal. It was written phonetically

Wait, are you telling me that the Polish alphabet contains no V but yet still has a V sound??
Crazy darn Polish language...
billpawl - | 32
26 Aug 2010 #28
If I ever moved away where no one knew me I'd insist on people pronouncing my name correctly. However, my parents and grandparents never did so it is too much of a pain to try to get people who have known me my whole life to relearn how to say my surname. It makes it a rare treat when I come across someone Polish who naturally says my name correctly, or the odd person who goes out of their way to learn how to pronounce it.

My wife isn't Polish, but I've taught her how to say our name correctly. She even knows her name should end in an "a" instead of an "i".
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
26 Aug 2010 #29
In America only large intimidating people with Polish surnames, like Larry Csonka, get them pronounced properly.
Suppoko - | 10
26 Aug 2010 #30
always use this

Ok I used that and it got my name wrong as far as I know. My last name is lukasiewicz and it pronounced it lye-kos-ovich and that is not how my grandparents pronounced it.


Home / USA, Canada / Poles in America: How do you pronounce your Polish surname?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.