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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


pgtx 29 | 3,159
28 Apr 2011 #91
i use these: marynowane_podgrzybki_2.jpg

to make this:
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
28 Apr 2011 #92
And the red- brownish one in the second photo?

Let's just wait and see how many people really go mushroom picking. Nice specimens by the way, when I was a kid gołąbki z blachy with a pinch of salt were a real treat. Did you teach your kids about mushrooms or did you leave that job for grandpa?
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
28 Apr 2011 #93
when I was a kid gołąbki z blachy with a pinch of salt were a real treat.

I prefer gołąbki to other mushrooms, no matter how noble. Luckily, people are afraid to pick them, so I can be picky in the forest and choose the best specimen. :):):)

Did you teach your kids about mushrooms or did you leave that job for grandpa?

First, I taught myself about mushrooms as a young man, and taught my kids later on.

PS. What can you say about the next two photos?

i use these:
:)
to make this:

It means you destroy great mushrooms by mixing them into a tartar sauce???

Outragoeus sacrilege!

Precz z mego serca!
pgtx 29 | 3,159
28 Apr 2011 #94
PS. What can you say about the next two photos?

boczniaki?
gumishu 11 | 5,016
28 Apr 2011 #96
the creamy ones look like wild champignons to me (aka pieczarki)

don't know these brownish shrooms

edit: no the creamy stuff are not champignons - some kind of borowik?
alexw68
28 Apr 2011 #97
don't know these brownish shrooms

Prawdziwki (porcini) or sowy, no?
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
28 Apr 2011 #98
Nope, nope, nope.

This is borowik/prawdziwek
Ok, two more pics of the disputed mushrooms
gumishu 11 | 5,016
28 Apr 2011 #99
I haven't actually seen those creamy mushrooms in my life (now that I see what their down side looks like)

perhaps I have seen these dark things but don't know them and never picked them
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
28 Apr 2011 #100
I haven't actually seen those creamy mushrooms in my life (now that I see what their down side looks like)

Funny, isn`t it? Those spikes, I mean....

erhaps I have seen these dark things but don't know them and never picked them

Yes, nobody does, that is why there is more for me and my family. :):):) After drying, we add them as spice to dishes, if that may help you.
strzyga 2 | 993
28 Apr 2011 #101
The brownish/black ones are kominki! They might be called differently in other parts of Poland though. Great as pierogi/naleśniki stuffing (boil them, fry with onions, add salt and pepper and mince). My father used to pick them.

The creamy ones though, I see them often but never picked them, are they good for eating?
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
28 Apr 2011 #102
The brownish/black ones are kominki! They might be called differently in other parts of Poland though.

Yes! We call them by their species name - lejkowiec dęty - Funnel Mushroom. Other local names are black boots.

Great as pierogi/naleśniki stuffing (boil them, fry with onions, add salt and pepper and mince).

They are not bad.

The creamy ones though, I see them often but never picked them, are they good for eating?

Yes, the best are pickled:
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
28 Apr 2011 #103
Go out more often and in no time you’ll be an expert too.

That's my project for this summer.

My closest friend is a professional mushroom picker, meaning he goes out every day during the season and picks them them to sell. Jagody too. He can spot shrooms which look quite dangerous but fetch a really good price. He also knows where to find plenty of kania mushrooms - really nice breaded and fried.
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
28 Apr 2011 #104
He probably means the maggoty mushrooms. Those sellers keep good shrooms for themselves and sell wormy ones, especially dried. You have to be careful.
wildrover 98 | 4,451
28 Apr 2011 #105
Why not?

I think it began because of the revoulting smell in the kitchen when my mum fried mushrooms.... i would not touch the dam things.... first time i ever ate any was at the age of 55... in Poland...

Never ate tomatoes either till i came here.... still would not eat UK ones.....
valpomike 11 | 197
28 Apr 2011 #106
But the Polish, wild mushrooms are the best, and I have tried several, and they are best.

Mike
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
29 Apr 2011 #107
That's my project for this summer.

Good hunting.

Jagody too.

You’ll find it a hard work as they grow very low to the ground unlike the American verity that grow on bushes that are as tall as gooseberry bushes but much more tastier. The wild raspberries and blackberries are excellent too, so if they grow in your parts and you have a chance to go, don’t miss it.

He also knows where to find plenty of kania mushrooms

Those are plentiful, don’t really have to have a special spot, they are tasty and being outdoors all day does wonders for your taste buds.

I think it began because of the revoulting smell in the kitchen when my mum fried mushrooms.

What? You find that the olfactory system doesn’t work as good in your old age or was it the variety that was common in Britain that did not have a particularly pleasant aroma or is it simply you’re not as picky anymore? There’s nothing like a taste of home grown tomatoes. As I recall your GF has a dacha outside of Moscow you’ll do plenty of mushroom hunting there as the Russians love their mushrooms too. If you have not done a lot of mushroom picking in Poland I suspect you'll do a lot of it there.
wildrover 98 | 4,451
29 Apr 2011 #108
Probably a mix of all those things.... Mushrooms cooked in oil in Poland do not have that horrid smell i remember back in the UK , and they have some taste to them , maybe because they were picked out of the forest minutes before we ate them.....

At the time i did wonder if it was my last day of life , as the guys from my bike club were all well drunk when we went on the mushroom hunt...

Thankfully , Poles , even when drunk can spot the difference between edible mushrooms and the kind that kill you....

I guess i just like the taste of real food , rather than the processed chemical filled junk we eat in the UK.... I miss British fish and chips tho....

Yes , my lady has a Dacha that belonged to her parents , her daughter lives there now , and when we sell one of the flats in Moscow we will be buying a house in the country , so i am looking forward to country cooking....well any kind of cooking would be an improvement on what i eat now....
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
29 Apr 2011 #109
This guy sells as much as he can (an elderly family member has a pitch outside a supermarket in warsaw) and bottles the rest He considers it a good day if all the previous day's pick (from 5am to late afternoon) is sold out by the end of the following day.

Good hunting.

Thanks.

The wild raspberries and blackberries are excellent too, so if they grow in your parts and you have a chance to go, don't miss it.

I've asked him why he doesn't pick those and always got a noncommital answer.

Those are plentiful, don't really have to have a special spot, they are tasty and being outdoors all day does wonders for your taste buds.

They're lovely. When I've been with him near Wyszkow I've mostly found prawdziwki and maslaki, but sometimes he comes back with a few kanie. To be honest, I'm wary of going too often for fear of slowing him down. It's a big part of his income. Great exercise though, and he's as fit as a butcher's dog.

Occasionally he finds some pretty dramatic looking ones (I don't remember the name) that sell for a fortune as soon as the stare ropuchy (his words) see them on the stall.
boletus 30 | 1,366
29 Apr 2011 #110
Is this this?


  • from wikipedia
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
29 Apr 2011 #111
Yes, it is, but mine smells better.
boletus 30 | 1,366
29 Apr 2011 #112
"Barszcz zwyczajny"

In medieval Europe, pickled young shoots and leaves of this herb used to be a basis for a sour soup, called "barszcz" in Polish. So historically "barszcz" was green, not red.

Young shoots are used today as an ingredient in salads and cooked like spinach. Brew of the herb resembles broth in flavor.

Not to be confused with one of two most poisonous herbs belonging to the same family Apiaceae. In Poland two such herbs are commonly known as "cykuta":

Cikuta virosa - "szalej jadowity" (water hemlock)
Conium maculatum - "szczwół plamisty" (poison hemlock)

Socrates, after being sentenced to death, voluntarily drank the hemlock in prison, in company of friends. Literary tradition speaks of drinking the water hemlock, but the symptoms are indicative of the the reaction to the poison hemlock.


  • Barszcz zwyczajny, Heracleum sphondylium
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
29 Apr 2011 #113
"Barszcz zwyczajny"

Wow, I know this smelly weed. Often wondered if it can be used in kitchen because it bears a striking similarity to dill.

d

So historically "barszcz" was green, not red.

It seems green borsch had many variants

, derived from the Polish name szczaw for sorrel. Due to its commonness as a soup in Eastern European cuisines, it is often called "green borscht", as a cousin of the standard, reddish-purple borscht soup.
boletus 30 | 1,366
29 Apr 2011 #114
The luxurious and the plain vanilla

Półgęsek, goose breast, "half-goose thingie"

It was a popular dish in traditional Polish cuisine. It is prepared from deboned goose breast. The skin is first marinated in herbs and spices. The meat plus skin are then either baked or smoked first, then baked. This used to be treated as a rather luxurious dish, usually eaten in manors. It can be served warm, straight from the oven, or served cold thinly sliced.

It can be accompanied by various sauces, such as cranberry sauce; raspberry dressing with Hungarian Tokaji and roasted almonds; creamy horseradish sauce - mixed with grated almonds and other ingredients, etc.

By the way, horseradish sauce used to be called by the French in the nineteenth century, "the Polish mustard."


  • Baked "pgsek"

  • Leaves of horseradish
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
29 Apr 2011 #115
What about today?

By the way, horseradish sauce used to be called by the French in the nineteenth century, "the Polish mustard."

I call it Polish tabasco.

Leaves of horseradish

Why are you presenting leaves? Someone may wrongly think they are the main ingredient of "Polish mustard."
boletus 30 | 1,366
29 Apr 2011 #116
Why are you presenting leaves? Someone may wrongly think they are the main ingredient of "Polish mustard."

Because it occurred to me that most people have no clue how the foliage of horseradish plant looks like. If my childhood memory does not play any tricks the horseradish leaves were much longer than those shown on the picture - 50 cm, or so.

But OK, here are the roots of horseradish plant. Before the days of the modern mechanical kitchen gadgets grating the roots was a job for men (or boys) - quite a physical exercise, with plenty of tears flowing.

What about today?

Actually the picture of "półgęsek" was taken from a web page of some food shipping company in Poland. Easy to find via google - just type "półgęsek". All customer comments I saw on that page were very positive (five stars), although one customer was not happy about the price rising from 66 zł/kg to 92zł/kg. Apparently this was typical supply and demand issue before Easter, and the company was hoping that their costs - as well as prices - would go down after Easter.


  • Roots of the horseradish plant
Mateusz_A Ty - | 12
30 Apr 2011 #117
This isn't what most of us eat.. We throw away the heads, and eat the rest.. Make it delicious with some sauce on top.. Po wengiersku. :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
30 Apr 2011 #118
This isn't what most of us eat..

Exactly. Only Krakovians. :):):)

We throw away the heads, and eat the rest.

Mistake!

Make it delicious with some sauce on top.. Po wengiersku. :)

Błeee....

What do you think about poultry?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
12 May 2011 #119
this one shits on Planty & Rynek Glowny... :)
in Krk called flying rats... pawian, don't tell me you eat that too....
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
12 May 2011 #120
I call it Polish tabasco.

Them Japanese call it "Western wasabi" since wasabi is in fact Japanese horseradish.


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