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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


LostSoul 3 | 84
26 Jan 2021 #991
I'm Polish and I think a lot of Polish food is exceptionally delicious. I wish it was more diverse, like in the First Polish Republic.

But at the same time, I think a lot of Polish cooks are inventive with the food here.
jon357 67 | 16,907
26 Jan 2021 #992
I'm Polish

Where about in Poland are you from?

more diverse, like in the First Polish Republic

It wasn't. In those days the diet for 95% of people was grindingly monotonous. Only the wealthy could experience diversity and even then, not all the time.

a lot of Polish cooks are inventive

It's important for a cuisine to evolve creatively. All cuisines evolve; either well or badly.
LostSoul 3 | 84
26 Jan 2021 #993
It wasn't. In those days the diet for 95% of people was grindingly monotonous.

I heard that noble food was diverse and taking influences from many parts of the world, we are not talking about peasant cuisine. Ah, ok, you already told about the nobles. I heard that communism contributed to the unification of Polish cuisine.

Where about in Poland are you from?

I prefer not telling, but I live in Southern Poland.

@jon357
jon357 67 | 16,907
26 Jan 2021 #994
noble food

The problem is that there was only ever a vanishingly small amount of that, among the wealthiest aristocrats.

There were some interesting things that came later with trade, industrialisation and diversity, like Pierogi Lwowskie in the 1930s. Paradoxically there were also traditions lost during the 1920-1939 period of homogenisation.

I like the regional specialities (such as are left) like forszmak, things you only get in certain parts of the country.
LostSoul 3 | 84
26 Jan 2021 #995
@jon357
Sorry, I'm a 21 year old girl, I was always a bit ignorant at history, even though I had a couple of good grades, but I like learning more about Polish history.
jon357 67 | 16,907
26 Jan 2021 #996
I like learning more about Polish history.

There's so much to find out. The way the food has constantly changed and evolved is fascinating.
JakeRyan16candle
26 Jan 2021 #997
This sounds interesting: copy-paste=deleted
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
26 Jan 2021 #998
The way the food has constantly changed and evolved is fascinating.

I do find it endlessly interesting how "Polish food" today is more or less a post-1945 invention by the Communists in order to maximise calories for people doing physical work.

I read this a few weeks ago - ciekawostkihistoryczne.pl/2017/10/12/polskie-jadlo-tradycyjna-kuchnia-to-wszystko-bujda-co-naprawde-przed-wojna-jadali-zwykli-polacy/ - about how peasant cooking in Poland was really nothing like how people think it was.
mafketis 25 | 9,320
26 Jan 2021 #999
"Polish food" today is more or less a post-1945 invention by the Communists

I knew that about carp on Christmas Eve (it had been one of those dishes that some people had on wigilia but it was the communists who popularized it as an essential part). I could understand the motivation as they were looking for cheap protein (and carp is both). I think originally they wanted to make carp a regular food but it's just not the kind of thing that people want on a daily (or even weekly) basis....

Apparently pre-bolshevik food has largely been lost as the few written sources that still exist are full of terms that even modern highly educated Russian speakers don't know... so reproducing the dishes is really hard...
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
26 Jan 2021 #1,000
I think originally they wanted to make carp a regular food

Yes, I think so too. It's fascinating how people believe that it's a genuine tradition, yet by all accounts, it was just another fish among many on the table. There's a fascinating article here about it - tokfm.pl/Tokfm/1,103085,8852873,Karp___ryba_kontrowersyjna_i_tania.html - the thing I didn't know until recently is that carp is doing all sorts of damage to the ecosystem too.
Ironside 50 | 11,042
26 Jan 2021 #1,001
Yes,

There's few sources to that:
Compendium ferculorum from 17th century by Stanislaw Czerniecki.
Uniwersalna książka kucharska from 1913 by Maria Ochorowicz-Monatowa
Nowoczesna kuchnia domowa 1934
Just few,
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
26 Jan 2021 #1,002
Thanks for those Ironside, I wouldn't mind trying out some recipes from before WW2! I know that Polish cuisine was much better then.
JakeRyan16candle
26 Jan 2021 #1,003
haha that's like the same way the state tourist organization in Bulgaria came with the now "traditional" Shopska salad in the 60s. Czech and Slovak tourists liked it so much they bought it with them in Czechoslovakia as Sopsky salat.

A similar story to the delicious Treska v majonéze (Cod with mayo) salad created in Slovakia in 1954. Most people assume those two salads are older and more traditional than they are. Doesn't make them any less typical.

Wasn't zapiekanka itself created in the PRL days?
jon357 67 | 16,907
26 Jan 2021 #1,004
Yes. As were Delicje biscuits which were a copy of UK jaffa cakes.
Ironside 50 | 11,042
26 Jan 2021 #1,005
I would call it an improvement on jaffa cakes.
jon357 67 | 16,907
26 Jan 2021 #1,006
Most however wouldn't, least of all the people who make them.

Do they sell Jaffa Caked where you are?
Chemikiem
29 Jan 2021 #1,007
Moving briefly onto drinks, has anyone ever made Kvass ( Kwas chlebowy )? I've tried it in countries other than Poland, but presume it's pretty much the same. I love it, so if anyone has a good recipe please post it. Also, I like the smoky tasting Kompot that's often served at Xmas. Is it just the dried fruits that give it its smoky taste?
jon357 67 | 16,907
29 Jan 2021 #1,008
I've tried it in countries other than Poland, but presume it's pretty much the same.

It is. Here it's often associated with Russia and Ukraine, though some people here do make it at home and supermarkets often have it.

I love it. Shops in the U.K. sometimes have it now. Tastes great, not good for teeth though.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
31 Jan 2021 #1,009
I'm sorry I didn't translate any recipes yet but I promise I will do.

Here is another Polish dish- Łazanki



johnny reb 29 | 5,405
31 Jan 2021 #1,010
has anyone ever made Kvass ( Kwas chlebowy )? I love it, so if anyone has a good recipe please post it.

Seems that you can use about any fruit of your liking to flavor it.

breadcentric.com/2017/07/02/kvass-kwas-chlebowy/
Chemikiem
31 Jan 2021 #1,011
Shops in the U.K. sometimes have it now.

I'll look out for it but I'm going to have a go at making it myself. Found a basic recipe and it looks easy peasy.

I didn't translate any recipes yet

No worries! I've tried Łazanki before and liked it, but it had cabbage and square pasta pieces in it.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
31 Jan 2021 #1,012
This one has sour cabbage but the pasta is different simply because I couldn't be as*ed to drive to the Polish shop
Lenka 3 | 2,561
3 Mar 2021 #1,013
@Chemikiem

Kaszotto

Slightly dry one garlic clove, add one chopped leek (just white and light green part) sprinkle with a bit of black pepper, cover and let the leek soften a bit. Open and move to the side and add chicken (about 250,300 g cut into small pieces and spiced with salt, pepper and a tsp of oregano. Let it dry until chicken is cooked, add the buckwheat (recipie calls for bormal one but I used roasted as I love the taste) mix everything and fry for about a minute. Pour in 2/3 cup of water mixed with 3 tbsp of soy souce . Cover and let the buckwheat cook for about 5,10 minutes. Stir in chopped Chinese leave (as much as you can get out of one :) ). Cover and cook for few minutes then open and let the liquid reduce. Add some spinach if you like. Done.

Recipie for krupnik a bit later.

Here is one of the standard 'lack of meat' PRL dishes





Chemikiem
5 Mar 2021 #1,014
Thanks for that Lenka :)

I might have a go at this over the weekend. Roughly how much buckwheat would you put in?

Here is one of the standard 'lack of meat' PRL dishes

They look a bit like rissoles. What type of filling would go into them? Bit hard to tell from the pictures.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
5 Mar 2021 #1,015
Roughly how much buckwheat would you put in?

100 grams

What type of filling would go into them

No filling just boiled eggs with bread crumbs, fried onion salt, pepper and raw egg
mafketis 25 | 9,320
5 Mar 2021 #1,016
boiled eggs with bread crumbs

kotlety jajeczne? I seem to remember having those a time or two in stołówka (but back in the 1990s).
Lenka 3 | 2,561
5 Mar 2021 #1,017
Exactly! There was quite a lot of such vegetarian versions but when the market opened and meat was freely available they became unpopular
Chemikiem
5 Mar 2021 #1,018
just boiled eggs with bread crumbs, fried onion salt, pepper and raw egg

That sounds quite nice, I would eat those.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
5 Mar 2021 #1,019
Easy to make. My proportion:
6 grated, hard boiled eggs, one small, chopped fried onion, one raw egg and bread crumbs enough to be able to form them. Then roll them in bread crumbs on the outside and fry. Voila

Usually served with dill or mushroom gravy/souce
Chemikiem
5 Mar 2021 #1,020
Thanks Lenka. I'm going to make those to take to work on Monday.


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