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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


mafketis 25 | 9,320
23 Jan 2021 #961
Isn't it too thick then?

no I make mine more hamburger shaped... little discs that are flat on either side....most Polish people make them more round...
Lenka 3 | 2,561
23 Jan 2021 #962
if that bread was toasted,

British bread without toasting????

hamburger shaped... little discs

That makes sense
Lenka 3 | 2,561
23 Jan 2021 #963
Talking about Mac and Cheese in the British thread reminded me that we have our own version. Pic is not of my cooking and link here:

gotowanie.onet.pl/przepisy/makaron-z-serem/f9f44f8



Lenka 3 | 2,561
24 Jan 2021 #964
Another thing in Polish tradition- naleśniki. These ones are with peanut butter and powidła śliwkowe (anybody can help with translation?)

Of course it gets folded



Chemikiem
24 Jan 2021 #965
Pancakes with plum butter.Looks tasty! The only time I've used powidła is when I've made piernik.
jon357 67 | 16,907
24 Jan 2021 #966
naleśniki

The word pancakes covers several different things. From wafer thin crepes via traditional English ones to Scotch pancakes and the American breakfast kind. Nalesniki are within the family of pancakes. Though in English we do use the words 'blinis' and 'blintzes'.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
24 Jan 2021 #967
It is. I only use plum butter with that or with omelette.
JakeRyan16candle
24 Jan 2021 #968
@Lenka
Lenka, hi! I wonder what type of cheese is that?
In general what types of cheeses are there in Poland?
Lenka 3 | 2,561
24 Jan 2021 #969
It's cottage cheese 'twaróg.

You have a lot of types of cheese but a lot of foreigners complain about Polish cheese
jon357 67 | 16,907
24 Jan 2021 #970
cottage cheese 'twaróg.

Not quite the same thing. In twarog the curds are cut differently and it's pressed lightly, which cottage cheese isn't. Americans call Twarog "farmers' cheese". There's no exact British equivalent however the nearest thing is probably curd cheese that we use in Yorkshire in baking.

In general what types of cheeses are there in Poland?

Aside from sheeps' milk cheeses and a smoked cheese in the south, Poland has koryciński which is a bit like queso fresco.
mafketis 25 | 9,320
24 Jan 2021 #971
Americans call Twarog "farmers' cheese"

We do? I think I've heard the name but I can't say for sure I've ever seen it... it's just not a thing in most of the US (like kefir). Cottage cheese is, of course, a staple.
jon357 67 | 16,907
24 Jan 2021 #972
can't say for sure I've ever seen it

I've only seen it on here and in very occasional recipes, mostly from Pol-Am websites.
Chemikiem
25 Jan 2021 #973
the nearest thing is probably curd cheese

Apparently Quark is very similar to Twaróg.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
25 Jan 2021 #974
Recently we have new type of dish gaining popularity- kaszotto. The main part in all different forms is that it has some groats that are cooked in the dish like rice in risotto.





delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
25 Jan 2021 #975
kaszotto

Ugh. I absolutely hate kasza, though that looks like it might be possibly edible.
jon357 67 | 16,907
25 Jan 2021 #976
kaszotto

Rather like the kasza porridge they have in Russia.

hate kasza

I like it, however it's at its best when done dry, Polish style.
Chemikiem
25 Jan 2021 #977
kaszotto.

I've never heard of it. Kasza instead of rice then. Not sure what to make of that as there are different types of kasza. I haven't tried many to be honest. Risotto is my favourite comfort food though.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
25 Jan 2021 #978
done dry, Polish style.

Ugh, no, it's ghastly and inedible. I'm very much a couscous man.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
25 Jan 2021 #979
Rather like the kasza porridge

Really? From what I read the Russian one is with milk. There is no milk here...

Not sure what to make of that as there are different types of kasza.

Different recipes call for different types. If you want I can translate one or two recipes and post them?
Chemikiem
25 Jan 2021 #980
couscous

I eat loads of it as I quite often cook Moroccan food.
mafketis 25 | 9,320
25 Jan 2021 #981
i remember in my early days in Poland being confused by different kinds of kasza (gryczana, jaglana, manna etc) in the US kasha refers to kasza gryczana only...
Lenka 3 | 2,561
25 Jan 2021 #982
From what I read Polish cuisine was reach in kasza dishes as obviously in the past they didn't have potatoes. Healthy choice .

How do you guys feel about krupnik- the soup with kasza?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
25 Jan 2021 #983
I'm not admitting to loving it after my previous statements ;) But I think it's because it's not dry, so it's much more edible.

I eat loads of it as I quite often cook Moroccan food.

It works with almost anything, and it's way better than pasta/rice/spaghetti.
Lenka 3 | 2,561
25 Jan 2021 #984
If I remember correctly it technically is a pasta?
But yeah, it is tasty
jon357 67 | 16,907
25 Jan 2021 #985
From what I read the Russian one is with milk

Sometimes yes, sometimes with stock.

couscous

After 3 years in Africa, I never want to see it again. Giant mounds of it with every meal.
Chemikiem
25 Jan 2021 #986
If you want I can translate one or two recipes and post them?

Thanks! I would love a recipe for krupnik, as I tried that at a friend's house in Poland and loved it. I wouldn't mind a kaszotto recipe too, if you have made one.

It works with almost anything, and it's way better than pasta/rice/spaghetti.

That's true. I quite often eat chilli with couscous! I do love pasta and rice though. I don't eat potatoes, so all those are my carbohydrate staples.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
25 Jan 2021 #987
If I remember correctly it technically is a pasta?

Apparently it is! I don't quite understand how that works, but it's tasty all the same.

I don't eat potatoes

Potatoes are generally a miss for me here as well. I'll make potato wedges with the skins kept on, but that's about it.
jon357 67 | 16,907
25 Jan 2021 #988
I don't quite understand how that works

Traditionally, it's made by rolling milled grain between the fingers until it gets to being clumps at the texture you want. Nowadays there are machines in the factories however in homes in rural Africa it's still done by hand.

The kind sold in Poland (and anywhere else in Europe) is pre-cooked. The raw kind takes ages to prepare.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
25 Jan 2021 #989
The kind sold in Poland (and anywhere else in Europe) is pre-cooked

I didn't know that! I did wonder why it was so quick to cook ;)
mafketis 25 | 9,320
25 Jan 2021 #990
I did wonder why it was so quick to cook ;)

Here's handmade couscous from Sicily via my favorite youtube channel... not a quick dish (the couscous part is quick, everything else is slow0.

youtube.com/watch?v=cb99rpeKcfE


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