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Teaching English in Zakopane, is it safe?


SeanBM 35 | 5,808
10 Jan 2010 #31
Warning against sects one characteristics of which is a display of certain signs.

I also photographed some of those signs.

Their leaders dress in robes, and the encourage other men and women to join them, work for them, wearing robes with hoods, and give all their money to them. Obsessed with sex too.

I can't help but notice that your avatar is on the 'Symbole Zła' warning poster.





jonni 16 | 2,485
11 Jan 2010 #32
I can't help but notice that your avatar is on the 'Symbole Zła' warning poster.

I noticed that too. It's the Eye of Horus: Check it out and decide for yourself if it's a 'symbol zła'. I just use it because I like it. :-)

I noticed they also consider the Yin/Yang to be a symbol of evil, which would come as a surprise to most people from China.

About sects in PL, there certainly are some. I suspect more so in the provinces that in Warsaw, and surely not in Zakopane.

Scientology has a presence but is largely underground - they do discreet voluntary work but don't actively recruit, and aren't allowed to by law. Hare Krishna are quite big in Warsaw, and have been around since the mid-80s. Bahai (sect or not is another matter) has a presence, especially in the provinces. The 'Great White Brotherhood' (the ones that were stockpiling petrol ready for the end of society then got fined a fortune when it leaked out of the underground tanks) have a small presence here, and Osho (the ones that deliberately poisoned hundreds of people in the US with salmonella) are well established and sell a lot of their founder's books.

One (smallish) language school here in Warsaw is very closely connected to a well known sect, but thankfully they don't try to recruit their native speakers. Many if not all of the Poles working there come from within the membership though, and I suspect their students get the soft sell. One of their corporate clients switched to me because the soft sell had become a little less soft.
strzyga 2 | 993
11 Jan 2010 #33
I noticed they also consider the Yin/Yang to be a symbol of evil, which would come as a surprise to most people from China.

Yoga and Aikido haven't been spared either. It's the Dominicans who are responsible for the anti-sect propaganda and they really go over the top sometimes. Not that many people treat that seriously though, apart from some die-hard Catholic fundamentalists.
jonni 16 | 2,485
11 Jan 2010 #34
strzyga

People in Poland are often quite spiritually minded, many too are unhappy with the RC church and are looking for something else. This can be a golden chance for a money-making religious group to find gullible new members.

Some of these new religious movements offer a quick spiritual fix, companionship for the lonely, a feeling of belonging to something. But none of them are cheap, either financially or psychologically.

Churches often overstate the dangers of sects and cults - the Dominican information centre here always takes a position against new religious movements without objectively analysing them. But many are indeed dangerous.

Closer to the topic of the thread, young and vulnerable EFL teachers, away from home and insecure, can be at risk of being recruited by either a cult or a fundamentalist Christian group. I've seen this happen.

But thankfully in Poland the risks are few - there isn't much chance of being snared by a sinister cult, and certainly not in Zakopane.
f stop 25 | 2,513
11 Jan 2010 #35
You might be told off for speaking English as my English friend got,

That's funny - I got berated for speaking English last time I was in back, and by my waitress, no less!
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
11 Jan 2010 #36
Closer to the topic of the thread, young and vulnerable EFL teachers, away from home and insecure, can be at risk of being recruited by either a cult or a fundamentalist Christian group. I've seen this happen.

What?! Seriously?

That's funny - I got berated for speaking English last time I was in back, and by my waitress, no less!

In my local pub back in Krakow the bar staff refused to speak to me in English at all by the end of it. I didn't mind all that much though, it's fun to practice.
convex 20 | 3,978
11 Jan 2010 #37
The "Graffiti everywhere" picture is awesome
1jola 14 | 1,879
11 Jan 2010 #38
Teaching English in Zakopane, is it safe?

Zakopane means Burried, as in with snow, so everyone should be careful, including you friend. The strong wind called Halny is something to be affraid of also. I'm sure you're make a good Góral and will have a positive experience.
jeetan 1 | 7
18 Feb 2010 #39
it should be ok. why u r fearing?
Trevor 6 | 66
18 Feb 2010 #40
I have a friend from Zakopane! She is a really good person (as all Polish people are)

Zakopane is gorgeous as well!
Hello_009 - | 4
18 Feb 2010 #41
I think it will be safe..coz everybody want learn english..its like basic need now a days
Trevek 26 | 1,702
18 Feb 2010 #42
Kayterr,

Just a slight 'warning', I'm not sure how common Black people are in Zakopnae, but I've observed a few things in North Poland which might be worth mentioning:

Black/Asian people are often figures of interest in many places. People don't see them that often, so they are likely to stare (a lot). If you are from a place where you are used to being one of a crowd, and people are used to seeing Black people, it can be a bit of a strain to find yourself being constantly looked at.

I mention this because I've been involved in a couple of projects where we had Black dancers/project workers come to our area up here and found it quite stressful to be observed and scrutinised as if they were from Mars. I had to explain to some of these guys that they would be going into villages where many people had not seen a Black guy 'in the flesh' and had definitely never met one.

This might sound obvious but the result can be hilarious (local villagers dressing up in their sunday best and taking a walk so they could 'see Black people'). In another situation one of the dancers got offended because one woman took his hand and looked at his skin.

It's important to realise that it isn't 'racism' in a hate way (bigotry), rather a very intense curiosity. people will be nice and charming, but VERY curious.

Of course, this might not be the case for you, but perhaps something to bear in mind.

Have fun!

Oh, you're not vegetarian, are you? Zakopane is not the best place to be one...

TREV:-)
voytek
1 Feb 2012 #43
I wouldn't be aware. I'm Polish and I would be very happy if any Afro-American would teach me English especially in Zakopane. Zakopane must be very inspiring city. Such amazing, famous and very important for Polish culture artists like Hasior, Witkacy, Szymanowski, Kasprowicz were based there. I'm sure you find it lovely, you will have many friends and very welcome accomodation. Poland is very open and heart-thinking. :) good look
Nicolastorres
30 May 2020 #44
Merged:

Advice on part time work Zakopane English, Spanish & basic Polish speaker



I wonder if anyone can offer advice on how to find jobs in Zakopane. I'm married to a Polish girl and lived in Poland before. My polish is basic so I can comunicate to a degree. I am building some holiday homes there next year and plan to move there soon. I will need some extra income to help me survive and I understand the wages will be low but any advice on what I could do there or where to search for job specifically in this area will be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
pawian 187 | 17,826
23 Jun 2020 #45
any advice on what I could do there or where to search for job specifically in this area

Firstly, you should type in Polish: Job Offers in Zakopane. There are few dozen offers each week.

pl.indeed.com/Praca-w-Zakopane,-ma%C5%82opolskie

I am building some holiday homes there

How are you going to combine two full time jobs at a time?


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