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Is it good for Poland as Sinn Fein will win today in Northen Ireland


Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,844
1 Nov 2023 #151
holidays

And there is alot more....germanic paganism differs from the native ones in Bolivia...or the latin one, the nordic one or the slavic one, etc....the dates differ, the traditions differ....but at some point Christianity took over, and to make conversion easier they adapted the cherished dates. Even the term "paganism" is a christian one...
Atch 23 | 4,057
1 Nov 2023 #152
But what happened in most cases was that Christians abandoned the old festivals and replaced them with the new Christian ones, simply keeping a few elements of the old and the Church discouraged observation of the Pagan rites and rituals. Ireland kept them and the Irish church did not discourage or forbid such practices. That's why my daily Mass-going grandmother still believed in the fairies and wouldn't do anything to anger them.
mafketis 36 | 10,861
1 Nov 2023 #153
Christians abandoned the old festivals and replaced them with the new Christian ones

I'd say rather that Christians renamed old holidays and modified them just enough to pass as Christian in origin.

As I said, no other major religion can assimilate previous religious practices the way Christianity can (nb I'm not a Christian but do admire the faith's versatility and adaptability).
Bratwurst Boy 11 | 11,844
1 Nov 2023 #154
.....I still see it as a kind of a victory that for example every Christmas the eternal Winter Solstice gets recognized (even often unknowingly), you can hear the old gods laughing:)
Atch 23 | 4,057
1 Nov 2023 #155
the eternal Winter Solstice gets recognized

We still do that in Ireland.

heritageireland.ie/winter-solstice/#:~:text=Winter%20Solstice%20Recording%2C%20Tuesday%2021%20December%202021&text=At%20sunrise%20on%20the%20shortest,'%2C%20to%20illuminate%20the%20Chamber.
OP Alien 18 | 4,845
1 Nov 2023 #156
My grandmother used to leave chairs by the fire for the dead so that they could come in and warm themselves

I think you still have nightmares. Fortunately, a dead person cannot be warmed.
Atch 23 | 4,057
1 Nov 2023 #157
I don't remember being scared. We loved ghost stories and they were always told on Halloween but we also played games and just had fun. I WAS terrified of the Banshee though. For some reason I had the idea that she'd kill me! Of course she's just a harbinger of death, she won't actually harm you.
OP Alien 18 | 4,845
23 Nov 2023 #158
Dublin on fire.
jon357 74 | 21,938
23 Nov 2023 #159
It was, at least a couple of streets around sports clothes and electrical shops.

Now the rioters have all gone home.
OP Alien 18 | 4,845
24 Nov 2023 #160
Well, we have a problem. What is the difference between an Irish breakfast and an English breakfast in Krakow. Does the Irish ambassador know this?
Atch 23 | 4,057
24 Nov 2023 #161
An Irish breakfast will consist of fried eggs, rashers of bacon, sausages, black pudding, white pudding. You can also have mushrooms but they're not always standard. Usually you'll get fried tomatoes too. An English breakfast won't have the black and white pudding and may have baked beans. An authentic Irish breakfast is accompanied by brown or white soda bread. An English breakfast will have toast and, or fried bread. The Brits might use tinned tomatoes, the Irish won't.
jon357 74 | 21,938
24 Nov 2023 #162
An English breakfast won't have the black and white pudding

There''s often black pudding in one although it can be optional since some people don't like it. White pudding is mostly around Staffordshire. I didn't know people in Ireland;and had it too!
Atch 23 | 4,057
24 Nov 2023 #163
There''s often black pudding i

I think the puddings are more a north of England thing aren't they? You know what's good up there :))
jon357 74 | 21,938
24 Nov 2023 #164
more a north of England thing aren't they?

Yes. Especially Lancashire however I've seen them in London, since the London version of cooked breakfast which may have influences from Ireland (I've only eaten it in inner North London) is a little different. They usually have bubble and squeak there too in the form of a pattie.

White pudding (and there may also be an Irish influence due to 19th century migration) is most often found around Stoke on Trent.
Barney 15 | 1,586
25 Nov 2023 #165
I WAS terrified of the Banshee though

So was I, didn't think She would kill me but really didn't want to see or hear one. I'm still not that comfortable with the idea of them even if I'm pretty sure they don't exist.

In the north we have soda farls and potato bread which is a must with any fried breakfast. Our soda is different to the soda bread in the Republic (which we also have but call it bread :))which always throws nordies off when we ask for it in shops
Atch 23 | 4,057
26 Nov 2023 #166
soda farls and potato bread

Oh God yes, I'd forgotten about them. We have potato cakes down south and I've seen soda farls for sale in packs but they wouldn't be as good as the freshly made ones.

even if I'm pretty sure they don't exist.

That reminds me of some public figure years ago, who was asked about something to do with planning permission in area where there was a fairy tree or something. He replied that he didn't believe in fairies 'even if they do exist' :) I think a lot of Irish people, particularly from down the country, would be very reluctant to deny their existence outright.

This is a nice bit about the Banshee.

youtube.com/watch?v=O1-Ys65pq8I
amiga500 4 | 1,541
26 Nov 2023 #167
took these 2 pics at the celtic-gypsy-rock gig... awesome shirt and awesome message. biggup the irish!





Atch 23 | 4,057
26 Nov 2023 #168
Maybe for Irish Americans - not very relevant to Irish people at this point in our history.
amiga500 4 | 1,541
26 Nov 2023 #169
Maybe for Irish Americans

Maybe for Irish-Australians,, which the opression is both before and after they came to the lucky country, linked with the Aborigines. Singers name in phot is Seamus. Btw Atch this is not a Irish forum, if you want to babble in Gaelic do it somewhere else.
amiga500 4 | 1,541
26 Nov 2023 #170
Let's just call what happened the Irish Holomodor.
jon357 74 | 21,938
26 Nov 2023 #171
potato cakes

Maybe my favourite food.

I think a lot of Irish people, particularly from down the country, would be very reluctant to deny their existence outright.

A huge swathe of the world accepts the idea of djinn so why not fairies?
Atch 23 | 4,057
26 Nov 2023 #172
if you want to babble in Gaelic do it somewhere else.

Now, now, you sound like Oliver Cromwell. I'll speak my language wherever I want to and anyway I didn't use any Irish, so what are you on about?

the opression is both before and after they came to the lucky country,

The Irish who went to Australia either through transportation or as free settlers generally did well for themselves, partly because they were literate. At one time in the 19th century nearly the entire police force of Victoria was Irish!

why not fairies?

Why not, indeed.
amiga500 4 | 1,541
28 Nov 2023 #173
generally did well for themselves

Yes, after a few decades, the Irish integrated very well into Anglican colonial society.

But the words of the great Christy Moore come to mind.

"And you can't live on love, on love alone
So you sail cross the ocean, away cross the foam

To where you're a Paddy, a Biddy or a Mick
Good for nothing but stacking a brick
Your best mate's a spade and he carries a hod
Two work horses heavily shod"

youtube.com/watch?v=s6EhcP81Hg4
Atch 23 | 4,057
28 Nov 2023 #174
Christy Moore lays it on with a trowel for a very specific audience.
OP Alien 18 | 4,845
28 Nov 2023 #175
Do priests in Ireland visit the faithful at home before Christmas? Czy chodzą po kolędzie?
Atch 23 | 4,057
28 Nov 2023 #176
No. You get an envelope popped through the letterbox with 'Christmas Dues' written on it and maybe a little calendar or Christmas card inside. You're supposed to put some contribution in it for the parish funds and but not everybody bothers. They just give more in the collection plate on Christmas Day.
mafketis 36 | 10,861
28 Nov 2023 #177
Do priests in Ireland visit the faithful at home before Christmas?

Do they do that before Christmas in Poland IME it's always been in January.
Paulina 16 | 4,211
28 Nov 2023 #178
The tradition in Poland is that it's always after Christmas (from December 27 until February 2).
OP Alien 18 | 4,845
28 Nov 2023 #179
In Poland is that it's always after Christmas (from December 27 until February 2).

After 35 years, I forgot that the priest came after the Christmas and not before the Christmas. The German priest doesn't come at all.
jon357 74 | 21,938
28 Nov 2023 #180
The German priest doesn't come at all.

It's the same sometimes in Poland. Round here you see a bit of paper stuck on the lamp post with a phone number to ring if you want them to call. In smaller towns and in villages it's probably different.


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