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Advantages of living in Poland as opposed to the UK.


poland_
11 Oct 2012 #91
'Advantages of living in Poland as opposed to the UK.'

Guaranteed sun in the summer and snow in the winter.
Richfilth 6 | 415
11 Oct 2012 #92
Does it mean an average Brit can`t afford going on longer vacation, e.g., one month, even within the UK???

Until fairly recently (2008?) UK law allowed companies to use the 8 national holidays (Christmas, Easter etc) as part of the 20 days of annual leave that a company had to offer to full-time employees. That means you only have 12 days away from your job every year, which translates to a two-week mediterranean holiday getting drunk, plus one wedding and one funeral. Of course, better-paid jobs came with more holidays, but there isn't a culture of being lazy for the entire summer, like in Poland.

I don't think I've ever heard of a UK person taking a month of holiday, and being able to return to the same job afterwards.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #93
7. Earnings, they go a lot further than in the UK.

Unfortunately, very few people in POland can afford a yearly holiday whereas in the UK even people on benefits can afford at least one foreign holiday a year.
poland_
11 Oct 2012 #94
From the above comment you have absolutely no knowledge of Poland. The vast majority of families have a ' dzalka ' they spend lots of time at over the summer, children have always been sent out of the cities for extended holidays. I do not know anyone who does not have at least three weeks of work over the summer period and one to two weeks over winter break. The saying in Poland is ' free days spent at home are holidays lost'.

In regards, to spending Poles have a higher percentage of disposable income to earnings than Brits or most other western european countries, they have less debt and the reason Poland has NOT gone into recession is its strong domestic demand.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #95
Unfortunately, very few people in POland can afford a yearly holiday whereas in the UK even people on benefits can afford at least one foreign holiday a year.

welshguy that is such rubbish, nobody on benefits could afford 'at least one foreign holiday a year', you obviously have never lived on benefits, and i can see the daily fail is your rag of choice.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
11 Oct 2012 #96
Unfortunately, very few people in POland can afford a yearly holiday whereas in the UK even people on benefits can afford at least one foreign holiday a year.

That's just not true at all. In fact - not being able to send your kid to a summer camp is seen as a sign of poverty in Poland, whereas sending your kid to a summer camp in the UK is a sign of wealth.

What's odd to me is why people pay ridiculous amounts to go to the seaside in Poland when you go somewhere much warmer for the same price...
milky 13 | 1,657
11 Oct 2012 #97
In regards, to spending Poles have a higher percentage of disposable income to earnings than Brits or most other western european countries,

Link?? This is not true

welshguy that is such rubbish, nobody on benefits could afford 'at least one foreign holiday a year',

Well. in Ireland people on the dole definitely could afford at least 2 foreign holidays a year, no problem.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #98
Well. in Ireland people on the dole definitely could afford at least 2 foreign holidays a year, no problem.

I heard that the dole there is very generous....no wonder the country is nearly bankrupt.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #99
welshguy that is such rubbish, nobody on benefits could afford 'at least one foreign holiday a year', you obviously have never lived on benefits, and i can see the daily fail is your rag of choice

Absolute rubbish. Are you British? People on benefits in the UK have full sky TV oackages, drink in the pub every evening and have at least one Spanish holiday a year. I know one guy who has never worked a day in his life and gets at least 30000 quid a year.

The saying in Poland is ' free days spent at home are holidays lost'.

I am not talking the lakeside holiday where they stay in a country house for a week and have a grill every day and go swim in the lake. I mean a foreign holiday. Its a fact that alot of families in POland can only afford these lakeside holidays and stack up the car with enough biedronka goods to last them a week.

That's just not true at all. In fact - not being able to send your kid to a summer camp is seen as a sign of poverty in Poland, whereas sending your kid to a summer camp in the UK is a sign of wealth.

I attended lots of camps when I was younger, especially witrh the Scouts and St. John's Ambulance
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #100
Absolute rubbish. Are you British? People on benefits in the UK have full sky TV oackages, drink in the pub every evening and have at least one Spanish holiday a year. I know one guy who has never worked a day in his life and gets at least 30000 quid a year.

total daily mail bollocks
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #101
Sorry but witnessed with own eyes. Don't read the Daily Mail. Either you are British but haven't been to the country for years and dont't know the real situation, or you're Polish and are don't know the realities or you are a Yank who knows nothing about the UK.

BTW, My sister, who is a single mother just came back from a 2 week holiday in Turkey, she has a council house paid for and her child's school uniform, dinners and school trips are paid for. Every year my nephew's class goes skiing to Austria, he gets the trip free. Now tell me i got all this from the Daily Mail. Oh and my sis also gets CSA money, and gets some help with petrol for her car etc. I don't approve of this but it's the way it is
Orpheus - | 114
11 Oct 2012 #102
I know one guy who has never worked a day in his life and gets at least 30000 quid a year.

Do you mean that he is paid 2500GBP/month in social security payments? How does that break down, e.g. housing benefit, unemployment benefit, etc?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #103
Either you are British but haven't been to the country for years and dont't know the real situation, or you're Polish and are don't know the realities or you are a Yank who knows nothing about the UK.

I live in wales you twunt, surrounded by people really surviving just on benefits.
so your sister is a scrounging parasite, no need to boast, but as for her getting petrol for her car, that is pure shiite.
Also your nephews class visiteing the same ski resort in austria year after year, that is in the realms of your tortured imagination.
My kids school offered a ski trip, I can asssure you nobody went who didnt pay.
pip 10 | 1,659
11 Oct 2012 #104
I guess the thousands who flock to Egypt and the like should read the expertise from this poster.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #105
She doesnt get petrol, she gets help with petrol through her ex which is paid for by his CSA contributions. Do you walk round with your eyes shut? Go to Merthyr Tydfil where people are on benefits and the bars will be full in the evening. 2 guys in the street where I used to live are factory workers, they cant afford sky so they have freeview, when they want to watch PPV boxing, they go to their neighbour to watch it who has all sky sports packages. He is on incapacity benefit but is also a bus driver for a local bar and receives cash in hand for it. All in all he gets around 25000 a year.

How dare you call mys sister that. She cannot work because my parents are sick and cannot look after her youngest child, her exes parents dont want to know. SHe does some work in the local supermarket but its about 4 hours a week. If she could she would like to go back to her job in Admiral insurance, it is degrading for her to rely on state benefits.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #106
. Oh and my sis also gets CSA money, and gets some help with petrol for her car etc. I don't approve of this but it's the way it is

you clearly stated the petrol money and CSA money were separate, as above.
No I don't walk around with 'my eyes shut', that would be silly. I have no intention of visiting Merthyr. Ever.
If you don't want your sister to be insulted, don't choose to use her as your example of how much there is to be made off the state.
pam
11 Oct 2012 #107
I don't approve of this but it's the way it is

Well things have certainly changed since i was unfortunate enough to be on benefits then. Foreign holidays? I was more worried about whether i could afford to have my heating on for the winter. It was a miserable, horrible time, and out of the above list, all i got was free school meals for my son,and a proportion of my rent paid.

Skiing trips and petrol paid for? Utter rubbish.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #108
exactly Pam, what worries me on a low income is money for the leci meter, and food.
and the school uniform help happens once, at the beginning of secondary school, just the once.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #109
Skiing trips and petrol paid for? Utter rubbish

Beacuse things have changed, please don't call me a liar. It is all about decreasing discrimination by allowing children from poorer backgrounds to have acess to the privileges of richer children. I'm not saying its a nationwide thing but the school my nephew attends has a policy like this backed by a couple of trustees. He has to keep up his marks in school though to be able to qualify for it.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #110
I'm not saying its a nationwide thing

well you were a minute ago.....
ach y fi
you are still talking nonsense whether 'things have changed' or not.
Life on benefits is no fun.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #111
Orpheus

It includes incapacity benefit, child benefit, winter fuel payments (dont ask me how he gets them, they are only supposed to be for old people), and a series of other stuff. He know his way around the benefit system and knows how to use it to his full advantage.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #112
look you only get winter fuel payments if you are over 65, so you wouldn't be receiving child benefits at that age would you?
Please stop talking arrant nonsense.
Orpheus - | 114
11 Oct 2012 #113
He know his way around the benefit system and knows how to use it to his full advantage.

Ah, well, if he's milking the system illegally, then the figure of 30k/annum is the fruits of fraud. Roz seems to have a more realistic handle on what's going on.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #114
Firsly, this man has children at the age of 12 (he is 57, has a wife of 42 and 4 kids). Secondly, since you come from Wales you know that OAP's receive free bus transport too. Great in theory but there are so many ppl who are noat OAP's/ disabled getting accesess to this stuff. Please dont tell me that ytou have never seen a younger, healthy looking person with one of those passes and wondered how the hell they got it. It is possible to get any benefits in the UK if you know the loopholes

Ah, well, if he's milking the system illegally, then the figure of 30k/annum is the fruits of fraud. Roz seems to have a more realistic handle on what's going on.

Didnt say it was legal, the issue is whether he can afford a Spanish holiday once a year. THe answer is easily. I hope they catch him one day but TBH in the 30 years I have been alive, I've never seen him do an honest day's work. He just seems to get away with it
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #115
Please dont tell me that ytou have never seen a younger, healthy looking person with one of those passes and wondered how the hell they got it. It is possible to get any benefits in the UK if you know the loopholes

no I have never seen a young person with an old persons bus pass tbh but then I avoid travelling on buses if possible.
I don't know what your point is welshguyinpola, that some individuals that you seem to know very well, know their way round the benefit system and milk it for all it's worth?

It's all here for you if you are jealous y know? trust me it won't be half as easy and fun as you seem to think.
pam
11 Oct 2012 #116
I'm not saying its a nationwide thing but the school my nephew attends has a policy like this backed by a couple of trustees.

Now i understand.
I can assure you this is not the norm nationally.
Believe me that life on benefits is grim. Mostly it's robbing Peter to pay Paul. I became an expert juggler when i was on benefits.

I , for one,would not like to repeat the experience.
It's criminal in this day and age, that people are forced to choose between food and heating.
Some things really haven't changed at all.
welshguyinpola 23 | 463
11 Oct 2012 #117
I don't know what your point is welshguyinpola, that some individuals that you seem to know very well, know their way round the benefit system and milk it for all it's worth?
It's all here for you if you are jealous y know? trust me it won't be half as easy and fun as you seem to think.

My whole piont being is that there are too many ppl on bebnfits in the UK better off than those who work and its totally wrong. When I was in Rhodes last year I tried to avoid the Brit hotspots but ended up making a day trip to Faliraki. Got talking to a family of 3 generations, grandmother, mother and daughter (the grandmother was only 51) and none of them worked, the daughter was just waiting for a council house which she would receive as soon as she got back from her ALL INCLUSIVE holiday
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,852
11 Oct 2012 #118
Got talking to a family of 3 generations, grandmother, mother and daughter (the grandmother was only 51) and none of them worked, the daughter was just waiting for a council house which she would receive as soon as she got back from her ALL INCLUSIVE holiday

look you are so full of crap - if you were trying to avoid brit hotspots why on earth would you go to Fallafucky?
besides, perhaps that family had an inheritance they were spending, maybe they paid with a credit card..who cares?
it would be quite impossible to save for an 'all inclusive' holiday from benefits.
and why are you insulting people who live in council houses when your sister lives in one?
pawian 178 | 16,034
11 Oct 2012 #119
What's odd to me is why people pay ridiculous amounts to go to the seaside in Poland when you go somewhere much warmer for the same price...

Nope, delph, it is a myth that you can go somewhere warmer than the Baltic seaside for the same price in high season. It can be true for September or October, though.
poland_
12 Oct 2012 #120
Link?? This is not true

A key advantage within the country is the relatively low level of debt among households and firms, leading to a high degree of financial stability and a strong portfolio of banking assets. Finally, compared to its Central and East European neighbours, Poland has a relatively big and developing internal market that proved quite resilient to the economic slowdown. In short, Poland has a flexible, entrepreneurial and healthy economy that went through a profound restructuring before the outbreak of the global crisis. Every Polish entrepreneur confirms that, compared with the purgatory of the economic transition period between 1990 and 2007, the current economic troubles look much more moderate.

The biggest long-term risk stems not from finance and economics, but from politics. As Poland stays outside the Eurozone, the country enjoys a lot of freedom in shaping its fiscal and monetary policy to counteract the recessionary impact. There is, however, a price to be paid. The prospects of deeper economic and financial integration within the Eurozone, leaving Poland as a second-class EU member with decreasing influence on the bloc's policy and future budget, is an easily imaginable scenario. But the real nightmare, albeit still not plausible, is the potential disintegration of Europe, stripping Poland of the benefits of its EU membership. Joining the Eurozone looks feasible in the medium term from an economic point of view, but can be extremely difficult given the internal politics within the country and the nation's obvious lack of enthusiasm for the euro. Staying outside, on the other hand, increases the risk of marginalisation. But, for the time being, the government does not seem to have any other option but to prepare ostentatiously for their accession, and to support the plans for Eurozone reforms, with the possibility of voluntary participation in some Eurozone policies.

blogs.lse.ac.uk/europpblog/2012/09/25/poland-economic-success-orlowski


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