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Bilingual signs and notices all over Poland


pawian 200 | 21,488
28 Dec 2022 #1
Such signs and notices reflect the needs of the local minority which apart from standard Polish also feels like using another language. Sometimes it is a completely different like German or a dialect of Polish, e.g, Silesian dialect which was heavily influenced by German.

Let`s start with Silesian dialect which some people consider a separate language - Kaufland chain has introduced bilingual boards in two facilities in Silesia region:

katowice.wyborcza.pl/katowice/51,35063,29301358.html#S.galeria-K.C-B.1-L.1.duzy

Funny. Mustard is no longer musztarda but zymft.





Lyzko 37 | 8,704
28 Dec 2022 #2
Although only a visitor in Poland, I always found English bilingual signage annoying to say the least.
However in the above matter of the current topic thread, it sounds perfectly reasonable.

In the latter instance, presumably the signs and notices are written by native or truly bilingual Polish dialect speakers!

After many years experience both travelling as well as living abroad in Europe, I can safely say that bilingual signage in English is often a recipe for disaster, or at least, comical misunderstanding.

Think I must have shared my story regarding a sign ONLY in English at a pub in Copenhagen which read: "DON'T HAVE CHILDRED AT THE BAR!" Apparently, the barkeep was not amused when I off handedly quipped that normally people have them in a hospital LOL

When once in Amsterdam, this time a bilingual sign above a coffee shop restroom stated: "JOHN FOR MEN AND WOMEN OR OF DIFFERENT SEX!"

If anybody can explain that one, they're good:-)
OP pawian 200 | 21,488
14 Jan 2023 #3
Northern Poland with Lithuanian minority has such signs:



Lyzko 37 | 8,704
15 Jan 2023 #4
Perfectly reasonable. How about Gorlice/Goerlitz, Jasna Gora/Hellberg etc.?
Alien 12 | 2,675
15 Jan 2023 #5
Görlitz/Zgorzelec
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
16 Jan 2023 #6
Thanks
Ziemowit 14 | 4,444
16 Jan 2023 #7
Sometimes it is a completely different like German or a dialect of Polish

Not to forget that Silesian has quite a number of Old-Polish words that haven't survived in standard Polish.

Also, the Silesian of towns is considerably different than the Silesian of villages. The great diversity of dialects within the Silesian language is one of the reasons for not considering it a separate "language" by some.

In one of your pictures I can understand the signboard in Silesian (Akcesoryje na fajery), whereas I don't understand the version in Polish (Akcesoria party) which is incorrect Polish in my view.
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
17 Jan 2023 #8
Wonder whether or not in Zakopane signage reflects similar bilingualism among the goral (mountaineers) vs. standard Polish.
Miloslaw 14 | 4,912
17 Jan 2023 #9
Wonder whether or not in Zakopane signage reflects similar
bilingualism among the goral

Interesting question.
Although most Gorals identify as Polish, some are Czech and some Slowak.
Both of those languages are a considerable influence, especially Slowak.
But these people all understand Polish perfectly, even though some Poles may struggle to understand them.
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
18 Jan 2023 #10
Their dialect though is kinda cute!

Standard Polish goral gwara
zegar godzinnek
etc.
OP pawian 200 | 21,488
21 Jan 2023 #11
Northern Poland with Lithuanian minority has such signs:

South-west of Poland hosts such signs for German minority in Opole region.





Lyzko 37 | 8,704
23 Jan 2023 #12
.....Torun/Thorn, Chorzow/Koenigshuette, Zielona Gora/Gruenberg........
Alien 12 | 2,675
23 Jan 2023 #13
@Lyzko
No, there is no German minority in those cities.
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
24 Jan 2023 #14
Any longer, you mean!
Of course not. I'm only referring here to historical place names:-)
OP pawian 200 | 21,488
27 Jan 2023 #15
South east of Poland hosts such signs for Lemko Ukrainian minority:
They are unusual coz written in Cyrillic script:







Lernende
28 Jan 2023 #16
South-west of Poland hosts such signs for German minority in Opole region.

Super! I had had no idea about it.
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
30 Jan 2023 #17
Nearly every town, certainly larger city, in Poland had historically both a German right alongside a Polish name. Perhaps these days, your Westermann Atlas gives both names, but when I was first in Germany during the mid-'80's, "SZCZECIN" was always listed as "STETTIN" and nothing else:-)

I'm sure that's changed.
OP pawian 200 | 21,488
31 Jan 2023 #18
I don't understand the version in Polish (Akcesoria party) which is incorrect Polish in my view.

Yes, indeed, that must be a subdialect within the Silesian dialect.

I was first in Germany during the mid-'80's, "SZCZECIN" was always listed as "STETTIN" and nothing else:-)

That was the time of the Cold War when some Germans still believed in retrieving the territory they lost after WW2. The few descendants of German DPs who once lived on those lands still dream of returning there.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 12,340
31 Jan 2023 #19
Or a much easier reason? Stettin is for Germans just that much easier to pronounce as such a tonguebreaker without vowels as the polish version....;)

The same with Warschau or Danzig...i's more a language thing...but Szcscheczin takes the crown!
OP pawian 200 | 21,488
31 Jan 2023 #20
Stettin is for Germans just that much easier to pronounce

Oh, yes, quite right, I forgot about it.
Lyzko 37 | 8,704
31 Jan 2023 #21
Today, I'd imagine that both versions appear in German atlases.


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