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What about that Banja Luka Serbian restaurant in Warsaw; Is that realy that good?


Crow 157 | 10,843
21 Apr 2011 #1
i heard all the best about some Banja Luka restaurant in Warsaw. Did somebody of you people here visited that place? heard something?

should i visit that place this summer?

i just founded this suitable pic

Banja Luka

szuki.pl/warszawa-mokotow/restauracje/banja-luka

Szef kuchni jest Serbem, kelnerki noszą ludowe stroje. Restauracja posiada własną wędzarnię. Muzyka na żywo.

poland_
21 Apr 2011 #2
Banja Luka restaurant in Warsaw

Yes I have been there it is on Pulawska close to the swimming pool Warszawianka. It was good
pgtx 30 | 3,156
21 Apr 2011 #3
should i visit that place this summer?

i think so:

yummy
pottedbylocals.com/warsaw/category/activity/restaurants/page/2

banjaluka website
banjaluka.pl
Harry
21 Apr 2011 #4
Did somebody of you people here visited that place?

Yes, I didn't like it at all. Mala Serbia was far better (if you could overcome the lack of ventilation) but it's been replaced by a British pub now. There's a half decent place near the finance ministry but I forget the name of it now.
OP Crow 157 | 10,843
21 Apr 2011 #5
i think so: yummy

when i travel i don`t like to lunch at hotel or have diner there. i likes to eat in local restaurants. Only breakfast is always good at hotel.

you know what would i do? i would take taxi, choose some section of the city for that day/evening and then, i would walk in search for good places there

Is there some Polish patriotic place, traditional restaurant or anything, some place that could be worth to be seen and in the same time eat and drink there?

banjaluka website

yes, i sow this. Thanks
poland_
21 Apr 2011 #6
i likes to eat in local restaurants

If you want a hearty meal in Warsaw at decent prices, then try Kompania piwna o Podwale, its on the Czech theme, with a Polish twist.
OP Crow 157 | 10,843
21 Apr 2011 #7
warszawski

tell me for some place where i can listen in live Polish patriotic songs and drink with brotherly Polish patriots and revive memories about glorious days of hussars
sobieski 107 | 2,128
21 Apr 2011 #8
Around the corner is Boston Port. Much better.
Harry
21 Apr 2011 #9
Best fish in Warsaw. Real shame their ghetto place closed down.
poland_
21 Apr 2011 #10
tell me for some place where i can listen in live Polish patriotic songs and drink with brotherly Polish patriots and revive memories about glorious days of hussars

Outside Warszawa centralna at about 2 am, its a great sing a long and they even do BYO.

Best fish in Warsaw. Real shame their ghetto place closed down.

I had heard and read many good things about Boston Port, I went along for the seafood chowder and was not impressed, I must have caught them on a bad day, bcus the food was rank. That was about 6 years ago and I have not been back since.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
21 Apr 2011 #11
Banja Luka Serbian

I've never had Serbian food Crow, is it any good??
Natasa 1 | 580
22 Apr 2011 #12
You didn't ask me, anyway I think I am competent enough to answer this one ;) Unlike most of the Serbs I had argues with about , I don't think it is something special.

People here like to eat a lot of meat (pork, beef, lamb), so biggest Serbian cuisine achievements are related to meat.
Worth a try IMO are Sarma (sour cabbage with minced meat). Kajmak (sort of cheese, foreigners don't understand it usually), ajvar (boiled paprika with spices).

Meat has excellent quality. Vegetables and fruits too (above EU standards).

Cakes are awful. I guess it has to do something with climate, too warm for more demanding sugar/fat combos.
Foreigners also are very pleasantly surprised with our pastry.
One American girl said " I'm going to miss the bakery (she was asked is she will miss anything)".

(there are many German, Italian , Greek and Turkish influences, each army brought its recipes (Greeks brought it with love);))
Trevek 26 | 1,702
22 Apr 2011 #13
Sarma (sour cabbage with minced meat). Kajmak (sort of cheese, foreigners don't understand it usually), ajvar (boiled paprika with spices).

Oh, you got my mouth watering! I ADORE sarma. Loved it with grape leaves. I also remember arriving in Skopje during late summer/early autumn when the whole city smelled of roasting peppers as people made the ajvar outside!

Must admit to not being over familiar with the cheese.
pgtx 30 | 3,156
22 Apr 2011 #14
I ADORE sarma. Loved it with grape leaves

that's a popular local dish... Greece and Turkey have it also, it's just called differently... very yummy...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
22 Apr 2011 #15
I would like to explore such options tbh. I tried cevapcici (??) in Belgrade and was impressed. The pastry in Serbia was lovely. In Scotland, we like pastry items so it was a pleasant surprise. I think Poles also enjoy such things. I know Banka Luka from chess and it's in Bosnia. I enjoyed my food in Sarajevo. Crow and Natasa, send more Serbian folk here to Silesia, please. Variety is the spice of life and extra options wouldn't hurt :) :)
FredChopin - | 61
22 Apr 2011 #16
I tried cevapcici (??) in Belgrade and was impressed

They are wonderful little morsels of meat. I like mine with tzaziki (??) sauce.
pgtx 30 | 3,156
22 Apr 2011 #17
tzaziki

tzatziki.... excellent choice :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
22 Apr 2011 #18
Pgtx got the spelling right :) Yeah, it's a lovely sauce :) I like Polish 'mizeria' sauce. Knorr do it well :)

A lot of Polish fare is for the winter so foreign summer options may go down well. I, for one, love kebabs but not in spring/summer. Serbian food would be a welcome change.
Marynka11 4 | 676
22 Apr 2011 #19
Crow, could you educate me on the specifics of the cuisines of the post-Yugoslavian countries?

Is it a one melting pot, or each ethnic group kept some set of dishes that are only specific to the given area?
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
22 Apr 2011 #20
Around the corner is Boston Port. Much better.

Yes. Just at the back of Banja Luka and very very good. The garden outside is dog-friendly.

Best fish in Warsaw. Real shame their ghetto place closed down.

A shame - when did it close?
Trevek 26 | 1,702
22 Apr 2011 #21
that's a popular local dish... Greece and Turkey have it also, it's just called differently

Apparently the word 'sarma' is from Turkish and means 'wrap around'. My old wrestling coach in Scotland told me there is a wrestling move of the same name in Turkish.

A point to note is that sarma is not the same as dolmades, it's more like Polish gołąbki (sp?)

could you educate me on the specifics of the cuisines of the post-Yugoslavian countries?

Robert Makłowicz did a programme from macedonia a few months ago.
southern 75 | 7,096
22 Apr 2011 #22
Greece and Turkey have it also, it's just called differently... very yummy...

Dolmades.It depends a lot on the person who cooks it.If it is successfully made you lick your fingers.We usually use it as appetizer.Filled with rice or meat.Hot is always better.
Natasa 1 | 580
22 Apr 2011 #23
Filled with rice or meat

Ours is always mixed meat and rice, hot. Naturally.

Is it a one melting pot, or each ethnic group kept some set of dishes that are only specific to the given area?

Dear Marynka, feeling of some shared values ;) is inviting me to give you an answer in Crow's absence :))

Croatia- Mostly Mediterranean (Italy) cuisine with Austrian influences. Lots of fish, pasta and better cakes than those we (don't) eat.

Slovenia - Austrian as far as I know, didn't eat much there.

Bosnia - melting pot, has its own dishes like " bosnian pot", mix of everything. Turkish heritage very pronounced, a lots of pies, no pork these days, interesting.

Macedonia - excellent vegetables and fruits, similar to Serbian

Montenegro - meat monsters, although they have a piece of coast, nice one, you can hardly find a good fish restaurant, mostly serving MEAT!!!! (I heard the locals complain how there is no fish there due to the configuration of the underwater terrain, while Croats few km away have plenty of fish)

Crow, correct me if I'm wrong
Marynka11 4 | 676
23 Apr 2011 #24
Thank you Natasa. Macedonia and Serbia sound like my kind of foods. I like fruit and veggies, with just a little meat (and it has to be lean).

There are already so many things I like about Serbia...:)
pgtx 30 | 3,156
23 Apr 2011 #25
I like fruit and veggies

mediterranean cuisine is perfect for you then... delicious :)
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
23 Apr 2011 #26
You didn't ask me, anyway I think I am competent enough to answer this one ;)

I'm so sorry Natasa ;)

People here like to eat a lot of meat (pork, beef, lamb)

I'm a meat man myself so i'm sure i'd love Serbian cuisine
Marynka11 4 | 676
23 Apr 2011 #27
Robert Makłowicz did a programme from macedonia a few months ago

Thanks Trevek. I will check it out.

mediterranean cuisine is perfect for you then... delicious :)

Mediterenean is Greek, right? I like that. Italian, not so much. Pizza/pasta: not my thing.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
28 Apr 2011 #28
I like Italian food but they over do it with the tomato sauce it seams like every dish has it.


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