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"MAGISTER" OR "MASTERS DEGREE" - ARE THEY THE SAME?


Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 Jun 2010 #61
I remember leading the matura committee in the Polish private highschool I once taught in. I was the only member of the three-man committee who could speak English. Care to reassess your faith in the Polish education system?

The old matura or the new?

Some magisters are the same as an MA. Some aren't even worth a level 4 NVQ.

You could say the same about any graduates anywhere in the world. Some universities are good and some are bad - so?
Harry
9 Jun 2010 #62
The old matura or the new?

Old. I have no idea whether the same crap can be pulled with the new one.

You could say the same about any graduates anywhere in the world. Some universities are good and some are bad - so?

Not to such a wide extent as here.
frd 7 | 1,399
9 Jun 2010 #63
Old. I have no idea whether the same crap can be pulled with the new one.

Actually with old matura it was a bit different, despite passing the matura exam you still had to do your university entrence exams which usually were much harder (depending on the uni).

And although the old matura was more "fraud" prone it was much harder than the matura now. And now the new matura gives you the right to get into any uni if your score is high enough...
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 Jun 2010 #64
Not to such a wide extent as here.

I wish you would take your rose-tinted glasses off.
The Poles learnt all their dirty tricks in the area of private education from the so-called West. There are tons of colleges and universities all over Europe and the US which specialise in "teaching" "students" AKA manufacturing graduates on a purely "you pay, you pass" basis.

My son has just taken his matura exams and I was surprised to find out that they are not as crappy and easy as they are made out to be by some. I think my own matura exams were a lot easier and less stressfull overall.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,908
9 Jun 2010 #65
My son has just taken his matura exams and I was surprised to find out that they are not as crappy and easy as they are made out to be by some.

I think the basic level is a bit of a joke - I've seen the requirements to get a pass at the basic level and it's completely shocking as to how easy it is.

But to get three advanced passes at 80%+ ? That's completely different - and easily on par with the UK.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
9 Jun 2010 #66
Delph, do you have a Masters? Just curious!
wyddo
9 Jun 2010 #67
Hey,

Just out of curiosity if I have a 2:1 BA from the University of London - where does that put against a Polish Magister? Field of study was Geography.
internaldialog 4 | 145
10 Jun 2010 #68
wyddo

A BA degree in Poland is known as a Licencjat. In Poland they don't really have BSc degree they have parellel diploma/honours for Engineering in Technical Universities, but a licencjat is used for all courses whether scientific or humanistic -- and the MA which is a Magister is an extension of studies previously undertaken in Poland that can take the studing upto 5 years in total ... so i am told by polish friends :)
zetigrek
12 Jun 2010 #69
He said that in Poland the doctoral candidate is often given a subject by a professor. Is this correct?

No. Some bullsh1t. My brother is on PhD course and he had to propose his thesis when applying
jon357 63 | 14,635
5 Sep 2015 #70
A BA degree in Poland is known as a Licencjat

No. The UK has licentiate degrees as well.
In terms of hours of study and academic attainment a Polish Magister degree is rather like a BA from a traditional British university.
frd 7 | 1,399
5 Sep 2015 #71
As far as I know most Unis in Poland follow the ECTS system and a 5 years day course usually has ~2000 hours. According to wikipedia 1800 is a standard for British Unis as a requirement for the Master. I had between 1900 and 2000 as part of my Magister. I suppose the weekend courses have less. Maybe that's what you are thinking of.


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