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New Anglo-Polish alliance in the making?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
28 Nov 2016 #1
A delegation of key cabinet members led by PM Szydło have travelled to London for what have been billed as the first-ever Anglo-Polish government-level consultations. The unprecedent summit has been called in response to Brexit which affects not only the UK, but the EU as a whole and individual member states as well. Both countries had successfully resisted pressure to enter the eurozone and adopted a euro-realistic, pro-opt-out approach to the Brussels dictatorship. Cooperation in economic, defence and educational matters will be high on the agenda. Perhaps the Brits can learn a bit fo culture from the Poles and get weaned away from baked beans, marmite, milky tea and their still sporadically recurring colonial-era arrogance and know-better complex.
tellthetruth
28 Nov 2016 #2
Maybe the Polish delegation have gone to overview the new Policing methods in place in the anti-terror-police-deployed-on-londons-streets-10675458

Some in Germany would have you believe, allowing Muslim migrants unchecked into the EU has no threat to society...
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #3
their still sporadically recurring colonial-era arrogance and know-better complex.

More deliberate trolling I see. Is this thread to actually discuss the topic or just another chance for you to allow your bile to come to the fore yet again?

For those who are actually interested here is a link, seeing as though the OP is too lazy to provide one:-

bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-38129171
Ziemowit 13 | 4,405
28 Nov 2016 #4
get weaned away from baked beans, marmite, milky tea

I am definitely for them getting weaned away from marmite. Where the hell did the British get it from???
mafketis 25 | 9,340
28 Nov 2016 #5
Where the hell did the British get it from???

Consider it karmic punishment for their colonial past....
Atch 16 | 3,299
28 Nov 2016 #6
It was invented by a German. It was consumed not for its taste but its vitamin content and other supposedly healthy properties. I never knew anyone who ate it. I don't think it's that popular nowadays.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,405
28 Nov 2016 #7
So the Brexit vote results can't be attributed to an increased consumption of marmite, can it?
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #8
baked beans

Imported to the UK from your country lol

" baked beans usually refers to tinned beans in a tomato sauce. They were originally imported from American companies, first sold in the UK in 1886 in the upmarket Fortnum & Mason store in London as an expensive foreign delicacy."
mafketis 25 | 9,340
28 Nov 2016 #9
Imported to the UK from your country lol

And they fell for it!! HA HA HA HA!!!!!!!! We got rid of them and the English started wolfing the vile things down while asking for more.

US 1 - UK 0
Wincig 2 | 221
28 Nov 2016 #10
I don't think it's that popular nowadays.

I am not too sure. One only needs to look at the uproar triggered by Unilever when they tried to raise the price a few weeks ago..
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #11
And they fell for it!!

Big time lol!

vile things

They are! Maybe I'm not really British, can't stand marmite or milky tea either!
Ziemowit 13 | 4,405
28 Nov 2016 #12
can't stand marmite or milky tea either!

I like milky tea in England, but I can't stand it in Poland. I suppose the reason for it is that tea sold in England is usually much stronger than it typically is in Poland.
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #13
tea sold in England is usually much stronger than it typically is in Poland.

I think it is, but I've never had black tea in Poland, I've been offered either fruit tea or coffee.
Personally, I like strong tea with just a splash of milk, often called builders tea over here.
Atch 16 | 3,299
28 Nov 2016 #14
I am not too sure.

Yes, you're right! I checked and they produce 50 million jars a year, only 15% of which are exported. Do you actually know anyone who eats it?? As I say, I've never met anyone in England (well London) who ate it or maybe they just didn't admit to it :)) Now Bovril is a different matter. I've seen loads of people consuming that, though they always make it into a hot drink. My Polish husband loves it, I'm not so keen, was forced to drink it in winter when I was a child to 'build me up' and prevent colds etc.
Atch 16 | 3,299
28 Nov 2016 #15
strong tea with just a splash of milk,

Yes that's how a lot of us (Irish) prefer it. There is a difference between tea with milk and milky tea which I don't think Polly appreciates. I used to take my tea the same way as you, but I stopped taking milk in it when I lived in Poland first time round and never started again, so it's been black tea for me for the last ten years.

tea sold in England is usually much stronger than it typically is in Poland.

Yes, the blends favoured in Poland are as weak as water, I buy English tea.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
28 Nov 2016 #16
fruit tea

What are marketed as fruit teas are a lab-produced chemicalised concoction contaning synthetic aromas, colour and flavouring but little if nay actual fruit. Best to keep it at least a barge-pole away.
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #17
was forced to drink it in winter when I was a child to 'build me up' and prevent colds etc.

Yes, I was forced to drink it too, because " It'll do you good ". That along with the dreaded teaspoons of cod liver oil..yuk! I think it's the amount of salt in both Marmite and Bovril which makes me dislike them both so much tbh.

There is a difference between tea with milk and milky tea which I don't think Polly appreciates

I doubt whether he has ever had a proper cup of tea to be honest. Milky tea is undrinkable!!
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
28 Nov 2016 #18
Milky tea

Pray tell what is the difference? I've had it prepared by UK colleagues but prefer black tea in a glass. Used to with lemon until I learnt a negative chemical reaction occurs. Coffee also black, no sugar. Calls to mind a quip that'll have all the PC fanatics in a tizzy: "Ah lahks ma coffee like ah lahks ma wimmen -- straung and blaaack!"
Atch 16 | 3,299
28 Nov 2016 #19
Pray tell what is the difference?

Milky tea in our part of the world, UK and Ireland, would refer to tea with a very large amount of milk added so that the drink has an almost whitish hue. Tea 'with milk' on other hand, has a lovely golden colour or a very dark brown depending on how strong the infusion of tea is before the milk is added.

I've had it prepared by UK colleagues

They should prepare it black and allow you to add milk to your preference. That's the correct way. They should never hand you a cup of tea with the milk added. You'd only do that with people you know very well as tea drinkers tend to be very decided about the ratio of tea to milk. They should also ascertain how strong you like your tea.

tea in a glass

Yes, a lovely Russian tea glass in a silver holder, I'd like that. But my favourite is tea from a bone china cup.
TicTacToe
28 Nov 2016 #20
"Ah lahks ma coffee like ah lahks ma wimmen -- straung and blaaack!"

Who the hell talks like that !
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #21
tea with a very large amount of milk added so that the drink has an almost whitish hue.

It would also end up lukewarm with hardly any taste to it :-(

tea drinkers tend to be very decided about the ratio of tea to milk.

Definitely!

tea from a bone china cup.

The only way to drink it.

Ah lahks ma coffee like ah lahks ma wimmen -- straung and blaaack!"

Hilarious.........not.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
28 Nov 2016 #22
tea with milk

Did you know tea with milk is known in Poland as bawarka (Bavarian girl), presumably thence it came. Most Poles find it hideous but nursing mothers are told to drink it because it allegedly promotes good lactation.
Atch 16 | 3,299
28 Nov 2016 #23
lukewarm with hardly any taste to it :-(

Yes, absolutely disgusting! I'm sure that it used to be favoured for people with 'delicate digestions' :) I remember after the Christmas concert in primary school, a favoured few children and parents were invited to the staffroom for tea and sandwiches. Horrendously milky tea and the ubiquitous triangular white bread delights, with butter an inch thick (I HATED butter) and almost invisible ham. And you had to choke down every nauseating morsel and drink every drop so as not to 'upset the nuns'. In any case it was quite likely that one of them would have proceeded to deliver a lecture about the starving children of Africa etc. This bounty was served from a serviceable but suitably festive tea set adorned with huge red roses. Ah, fond memories.........
Harry
28 Nov 2016 #24
More deliberate trolling I see.

Nail and head there.

A look at the photo of the meeting shows what's wrong:

meeting

The Dear Leader Chairman Kaczynski has't bothered to turn up. Instead he's sent a selection of his puppets, who will later report back to him. So nothing that is agreed at these meetings will have any validity at all. Just a complete waste of time, as the "real actual leader" couldn't be bothered to fly to the UK.
Wincig 2 | 221
28 Nov 2016 #25
Do you actually know anyone who eats it??

Yes, me! And I am not even a Brit!! The key is to spread it very thinly over buttered toast. If you put too much, then the taste is too strong and it becomes not edible

Tea 'with milk' on other hand, has a lovely golden colour or a very dark brown depending on how strong the infusion of tea is before the milk is added

Used to have my tea as above before I moved to Poland in 2005 and saw the light ; now I would not dream of having it any other way than the Polish way. It is also how they drink it in Turkey; they should know, the Turks being by far the largest tea drinkers in the world
Crow 148 | 9,324
28 Nov 2016 #26
Good thread. God bless this forum for being able to provide, from time to time, good threads for decent people which could use tongue as a sword or even better- as virtual penis.

I for one, on the first sight can say that is very vise for panku Szydło to travel to Britain. Brits, especially English, are now desperate for Polish support. Maybe some good business can come our from this.

Or, maybe panka Szydło just travel to get new instructions.
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #27
Horrendously milky tea and the ubiquitous triangular white bread delights, with butter an inch thick (I HATED butter) and almost invisible ham.

Am betting you wished you weren't one of the favoured few Atch!

In any case it was quite likely that one of them would have proceeded to deliver a lecture about the starving children of Africa etc.

Oh yes, that brings back memories.......
Chemikiem
28 Nov 2016 #28
And to round Polly's trolling off nicely, in Europe the addition of milk to tea was introduced by a French lady, Madame Marguerite de la Sabliere, in the 17th Century. Nothing to do with the Brits I'm afraid, even though we adopted the habit.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marguerite_de_la_Sabli%C3%A8re
mafketis 25 | 9,340
28 Nov 2016 #29
I do feel obliged to mention that you are all wrong about tea. The very best tea is

brewed by the sun in a large jar

sun teas

served cold in a mason jar with lots of ice (and sugar, unsweetened ice tea is a northern satanic plot)

mason tea

Heavenly on a hot day with a plate full of chicken-fried steak, mashed potatoes, gravy and collard greens
smurf 39 | 1,981
28 Nov 2016 #30
served cold

Cold tea????

youtube.com/watch?v=gvnb0gUIYyQ


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