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Do you think that Polish people are rude?


Lyzko 45 | 9,409
7 Jun 2016 #871
If the war's worth fighting, Johnny, like WWII, then I'd VOLUNTEER!!!
Agunia - | 1
7 Jun 2016 #872
In my opinion polish people don't over use an expression "I'm sorry" like Canadians do, so they lost concept of the real meaning of it! They drop something on the floor and say I'm sorry to the floor of course, funny!
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
7 Jun 2016 #873
In this way though, they're really no different from most other continental Europeans, particularly the Germans:-)
bobbyjoe
29 Mar 2017 #874
I've come across both good and bad Polish people, some are the most wonderful people you can meet, and others, 2 minutes drains you of all energy and positive feelings you had.

I try and avoid the bad ones like the plague, but find it hard to find the good ones anymore.

I prefer Romanian's to Polish ANYDAY!
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
29 Mar 2017 #875
Romanians may have had much less contact with the West than most Poles, therefore they aren't as jaded or cynical and can still enjoy the naive pleasure of just being friendly and warm.
Hiltonie
30 Mar 2017 #876
As a non Polish person who can speak Polish and has a Polish Girlfriend, I think that Poles are misunderstood by the tones of Polish language being used with English words. This can come across to English speakers as rude although the Polish speaker has no intention of being rude.
That aside I think Polish peopl are some of the most kind loving people on the planet.
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
30 Mar 2017 #877
If voice is a factor, then the Italians ought to take first prize for aggressive-sounding discourse!

Once in Florence, I was with a native Italian acquaintance of mine at the time. I observed two people in such spirited conversation with one another, I thought one was going to kill the other:-) My friend saw my puzzled look and said in fairly fluent British-accented English, "Oh, don't mind them! He just invited the other one to supper, but she couldn't come, so they arranged another day, that's all!"

Raised volume and pitch need not always indicate anger:-)
ender 5 | 398
30 Mar 2017 #878
I live in UK for 10 years and I find English to be deeply rude with thin layer of manners. Most English do use 'excuse me' and 'I'm sorry' with out actually meaning it. To be honest lot of them feel offended when you not interact with them like for example: skipping fully 'taken' isle in supermarket but one of them and their trolly and moving to another could end up in you being followed by 'IT' and being told how rude you are. Btw taking whole isle is their national sport and I believe they doing that on purpose. What else can I say: WE POLES DO NOT KILL FOREIGNERS. Most of the stories of beaten foreigners is well covered up and quickly hidden and removed from internet. I believe that yesterday 8 Angles tried to kill 15 years old Pole with crowbars and baseball bats. So no we Poles are NOT rude, even GW when reported RACIST CRIME by some punks bulling some indian woman in night bus informed that worst they did was 'gentle pulling' of her scarf. And we all know honest full of love toward Poland and everything Polish GW is.
gregy741 5 | 1,232
30 Mar 2017 #879
live in UK for 10 years and I find English to be deeply rude with thin layer of manners.

i dunno..i find English very polite in everyday contact.i been here in the UK for way more than 10 years,and every time i go to Poland i feel striking difference. especially in shops.Poles are way more rude.

but you talking about 2 different things..beating someone or racist attacks has nothing to do with being rude..its violence.
ender 5 | 398
30 Mar 2017 #880
i dunno..i find English very polite in everyday contact

Are you sure? Don't you think that killing is little bit like peak of pyramid of rudeness? At the bottom you've got people able to control own behaviour, then goes verbal attacks, physical and...

This a screen shot from comments to article about attack on Polish boy could you analyse it for us please?
Sorry for poor quality. Comment states: Civilised people don't treat each other like this, however we feel. Animals do.'



gregy741 5 | 1,232
30 Mar 2017 #881
Are you sure?

yes i am.hey listen to me..not sure what you trying to prove here with your idiotic links. sure its bad thing happened,but thuggish behaviour is present in Poland in abundance.

dont give me silly links as a evidence and justification to smear another nation. being rude and being violent are 2 different things. check dictionary if you dont believe.it is perfectly posible to be polite person and violent,or to be rude and grumpy but peaceful.

i worked 2 years in charity org. dealing with polish people needing help..cant count how many time i was embarrassed by their rude,boastfull, aggressive behaviour. shouting "kurwa" every second word.

we can surely learn some manners from brits. and its nothing wrong with admitting this.once we acknowledge problem,we can improve.
NoToForeigners 9 | 998
30 Mar 2017 #882
Only Brits who still have class and so called "English flegm" are elderly people who remember the war times. British teenagers are mostly undereducated, noisy, filthy and they lack of manners is shockingly obvious. I find Poles and Polish teens especially much more respectful, polite and well... quiet.

Funny thing is I had always considered Polish youths "rock bottom" of behaviour until I travelled to England and met their "future".
gregy741 5 | 1,232
30 Mar 2017 #883
British teenagers are mostly undereducated, noisy, filthy and they lack of manners is shockingly obvious.

if you judge them by the looks of Piccadilly circus on Sunday morning-then yes.hehehe
but even little thing like ,when giving change in shop brits put it in customer hand not on counter as its custom in Poland.this polish way feel kinda rude to me now.
NoToForeigners 9 | 998
30 Mar 2017 #884
when giving change in shop brits put it in customer hand

Actually I usually get my change put into my hand too here in Żabka and Chata Polska.
gregy741 5 | 1,232
30 Mar 2017 #885
maybe something has changed..am away from Poland for more than 16 years.it use to be on the counter way of doin this.
am not saying that we Poles are bad but in manners and politeness department,we could learn alot from Brits.many Poles leved in the UK and hopefully they will bring some of that politeness to Poland.

here ,even bus driver always thank you for showing ticket or buying it.its just different league.and its no point denying
and as for this attack on young Pole... i tell you one sure thing... you are way more likely to be treated like this by fellow Pole ,if you hang around polish people in the UK .than by Brit.many might disagree.but thats what i believe.
ender 5 | 398
30 Mar 2017 #886
dont give me silly links

I didn't give you any links just screenshot from comments section of Daily Mail. Being rude and violent are not two different things both of them are social custom. You deal with the way you've been raised. So first at least in Poland is interact with strangers using an official manners then in more stressful situations you rise your voice if escalate you try to offend then goes phisical like pushing and it might end with fight. This is NORMAL way of interaction with people. I understand that qrwa become very popular in Poland in last 10 years I can say that I don't talk people who use it as a longer space between words and I end up not talking to 90% of Poles. But I do watch them and I have to say that all woman I know after couple years they stopped using it in normal conversation. You must remember that Polish language is hard for Poles as well long time ago lot of people were using 'yyyyyyyy' when they were talking to each other what gave them time to collect words from memory and correctly arrange them in sentence. Most of all I feel little bit guilty cos when I was young me and my colleges to shock each other were using most rude words we could find out. Btw way it's still with me' my invention: clitless c....t
NoToForeigners 9 | 998
30 Mar 2017 #887
@gregy741
In the UK a bus driver gets "cheers" and "thanks" all the time. In Poland buses have more doors so it would be weird if a guy at the back of the bus shouted it when exiting. :) In PKS where entering/leaving the vehicle takes place in frontal part of the bus I hear "Do widzenia" or "Dobranoc" all the time.

I believe that after 16 years you kinda have no real perspective :)
NoToForeigners 9 | 998
31 Mar 2017 #888
qrwa become very popular in Poland in last 10 years I can say that I don't talk people who use it as a longer space between words and I end up not talking to 90% of Poles.

Rofl. You'd have to be in prison to get that number.

You must remember that Polish language is hard for Poles as well long time ago lot of people were using 'yyyyyyyy' when they were talking to each other what gave them time to collect words from memory and correctly arrange them in sentence.

So you claim that Poles are very frugal with their emotions in contact with people they don't know or even foreign to them because of complexity of the Polish language? That's a very interesting point of view. I honestly doubt it's true.

Most of all I feel little bit guilty cos when I was young me and my colleges to shock each other were using most rude words we could find out. Btw way it's still with me' my invention: clitless c....t

There's no word "cos".
So you admit "rudeness is still with you" yet you evaluate the rudeness of Britons? Hypocrisy much?
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
31 Mar 2017 #889
Copenhagen must win for politeness!

When first visiting in the mid '80's, a passenger on a regular city bus apparently dropped his fare money and it rolled onto the street.

Without the slightest hesitation, the bus driver exited the vehicle, went to fetch the money, returned it to the rider, and we were off again:-)

Impossible to imagine anywhere else in Europe.
idem - | 131
31 Mar 2017 #890
but even little thing like ,when giving change in shop brits put it in customer hand not on counter as its custom in Poland.this polish way feel kinda rude to me now.

I have been living abroad for a few years but I have noticed it is changing - shop assistants in Poland started putting change in customer's hands. Not sure if it is effect of people who lived, travelled to UK who are slowly bringing this custom to Poland.

As I remember from old times polish shops had usually some small bowls when change was put in so it was not dropped on counter. I don't think it was rude just different- maybe showing reluctance to touch every customer?
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
31 Mar 2017 #891
My sense is that the English especially (compared maybe with the Welsh, Scots, and Irish) are only superficially polite, like the Americans, but the Poles really mean it when they are polite!

The Viennese for instance, still rattle off "Kiss the lady's hand!" as a kind of perfunctory greeting at fancy social events aka annual The New Year's Ball at the Wiener Oper. But they don't mean it.

When Poles say "Całuję Pani rączki!", they mean it. In short, the Poles are generally more sincere and honest than a majority of the English:-)
ender 5 | 398
31 Mar 2017 #892
From:

I end up not talking to 90% of Poles

you get:

You'd have to be in prison to get that number.

Wow. You are truly some English Wonder and your knowledge, grasp of logic and calculus shows that English education just thrive. Some facts then you've got 85 000 prisoners in GB 900 of them are Poles do the correct math.

I do know that what he really meant was to insult me and that is good example of English politeness.

complexity of the Polish language? ... I honestly doubt it's true.

Ask English living in Poland Patrick Nye his grasp of Polish is really good watch his channel on youtube and just ask how complex Polish language is.

you admit "rudeness is still with you" yet you evaluate the rudeness of Britons?

Sorry I admit is my fault I stopped talking to English on social level at all 100% there is no use of them for me any more, they did what I wanted. I admit that I do insult back black Jamaican try to be just honest with them and you can say ANYTHING and talk about EVERYTHING. Example I do say to them that Trump is my man, and black lives doesn't matter. Can YOU do that and even if YOU do that you will end up as another victim of stabbing culture.
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
31 Mar 2017 #893
.....stabbing and BACK stabbing culture as well:-)
ender 5 | 398
31 Mar 2017 #894
No point to talk about obvious so I need to respond from personal level. Hopefully it is bold enough. And I really dislike the unified stamp of rude when you just being simple, plain and honest with all respect. The present British culture is so twisted that they are unable to solve problem just because they can not plainly describe it so when they do it their way they create additional problem simply because they just stopped understanding each other in their secret language of suggestion twists and hidden insults.
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
1 Apr 2017 #895
Polish people I've found on the whole to be forthright and often unusually candid with their emotions, as I've stated before. This is neither positive nor negative, merely an objective observation culled over many years:-)
idem - | 131
1 Apr 2017 #896
I think English people hate confrontation that is why when something needs to be told or resolved in a more direct way they struggle , get frustrated and that is when back stabbing starts. It is seems to be quite justified psychologically as human behaviour.

Of course it is generalisation-I also met quite a few direct , blunt people in UK.
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
1 Apr 2017 #897
Yes, I agree to an extent. I think that Anglo-Saxon culture typically tries to shy away from confrontation.

On the other hand, there are plenty of belligerent Brits as there are taciturn, retiring Israelis (...although I've never met anyLOL)!
:-)

Poles often come across as opinionated, yet not doctrinaire, involved, while at the same time, self-assured.
idem - | 131
1 Apr 2017 #898
It looks that you have quite good opinion about Poles :-).

I am not sure about this self assurance. Maybe in Poland but on emigration lots of them lose lots of confidence and self assurance -unfortunately....
NoToForeigners 9 | 998
1 Apr 2017 #899
Poles are rude, boorish and full of hatred. Living among them is a continous unbearable suffering. Stay away from Poles. Stay away from Poland.
Lyzko 45 | 9,409
2 Apr 2017 #900
On the contrary, my opinion of Poles as well as Poland is overwhelmingly positive, however could you think otherwise?
:-)

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