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Are the Polish Police Gutless?


unique_username
5 Aug 2011 #1
I find them to be pathetic actually.

backstory- There are some brama hooligans that live at my friends block. 25 years old, shaved head, track suit, always with a beer in hand and swearing all the time. If you live here... you know the kind.

There are about 25 flats that have windows facing the small squared courtyard. Any noise in that area bounces off the walls and can be heard by everyone, even in their flats with the windows closed.

When I have been there, these tools intimidate everyone. I've been told on many occasions that neighbours have told them to stop swearing out loud and making so much noise.

IN June, one neighbour had his car torched by these idiots 1 week after he told them to shut up. I saw the car later with my own eyes and then I was filled in on the story about it.

Months ago my friends father had told these guys to watch their language and to be quiet before and been intimidated many times ever since, even having them throw rocks and bricks at their windows, 3 levels up. Luckily nothing broke. The police were called, and nothing happened, because they never showed up.

Now.... I don't know how these idiots were spoken to, so don't jump on me about that. Just saying what I know.

My same friend's mother had died late last month. Funeral was 5 days ago.

Last evening while it was still light, he took out the garbage through the second brama to the cans, and was jumped by the three tough-guys.

He had his jacket ripped off, shirt torn into pieces, shoes flew off.

He managed to escape, and ran to the first brama where my friend was waiting for him. She heard all the commotion, but it all happened so fast.

She took her dad upstairs, called the police. They took his info, photos, and made a report. They never took the shirt as evidence!!! Other cops only took the info of the 3 idiots but not arrested and taken to jail.

Later that evening, he had difficulty breathing and was taken to the hospital, and now he is there with internal injuries all day.

Today he is recovering.

Now.... is it typical for the gutless police to just talk to the guilty parties, not arrest and have them spend a night in cells even though they have grounds to do it?

Are the police that lazy?

In North America, they would be locked up at least 24 hours or until they had their chance to see a judge.

I just don't get it.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
5 Aug 2011 #2
One cop in Poland told me when he went to a grade school (8-15 yr olds) and tried talking to the kids they laughed at him. They have no respect because cops can't really do much and if they go too far they'll loose their job which is not easy to replace in Poland. During communist times each cop was like a sheriff in the wild west, he could beat you just on suspicion and there wasn't much one could do.
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
5 Aug 2011 #3
Are the police that lazy?

Maybe policemen salaries are too low to risk their life.

In North America, they would be locked up at least 24 hours or until they had their chance to see a judge.

We don't have jails and judges enough I suppose. PL is quite safe country without developed locking industry ;)
gumishu 11 | 5,017
6 Aug 2011 #4
welcome to the PO run country where policemen have to buy electric bulbs and toilet paper for their offices themselves

btw PO won an overwhelming victory in jails - over 90 per cent in almost every single jail

isn't caring for people's safety not the single most important thing the official state is for - if so then PO fails to run a state miserably

btw there are numerous reports that the police don't show up because they have not enough money to pay for their fuel - this is also why the police presence in the streets (say night patrols) severely decreased - and again they are not paid enough and now they limited their retirement priviledges - not much incentive to go after crime
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
6 Aug 2011 #5
btw PO won an overwhelming victory in jails - over 90 per cent in almost every single jail

Sources?
gumishu 11 | 5,017
6 Aug 2011 #6
ok this is 2010 presidential election - I could have mistaken these for 2007 parliamentary elections

but PO won a decisive victory back then too -

76.2 per cent . detained in detention centers and prisons across the country voted for PO and 7.6 percent . for the Democrats ; Law and Justice with a score of 2.8 percent . was under the threshold of the election - said the spokesperson of the Central Board of Prison Service Luiza Sałapa .

Entitled to vote in closed circuits prison was 87 447 people. Voted 61 688 eligible , or 70.5 percent .


PiS only had 2.8 per cent not 28 as the title states
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
6 Aug 2011 #7
welcome to the PO run country where policemen have to buy electric bulbs and toilet paper for their offices themselves

Were things really different under the SLD and PiS? Doesn't seem so...

and now they limited their retirement priviledges

As far as I know, their ridiculously generous privileges are still in place (retirement after 15 years? seriously?) - it's the civilian support staff that got them cut. There was the system that everyone in the police had a rank and so on - and so even the woman who does the photocopying for the chief was allowed to retire after 15 years service, which is frankly nuts.

and again they are not paid enough

They're not exactly paid badly either - and anyway, shouldn't they do the job to the best of their ability regardless of the salary?

isn't caring for people's safety not the single most important thing the official state is for - if so then PO fails to run a state miserably

There are plenty of examples during other governments too of when the state failed.

btw PO won an overwhelming victory in jails - over 90 per cent in almost every single jail

It's a very interesting statistic. I wonder why, given that there is/was barely any difference between the parties when it comes to justice, except PiS-led witchhunts?
gumishu 11 | 5,017
6 Aug 2011 #8
: and again they are not paid enough
delphiandomine wrote: They're not exactly paid badly either - and anyway, shouldn't they do the job to the best of their ability regardless of the salary?

including risking their lives? and does a policeman know when is he going to face a risk to his life - any law enforcing can turn into life threatening situation

and look at the whole 'HWDP' culture - I'm not sure where it came from but from a basic logic stance the culture is self-defeating (I wonder if there is steady increase in youth crime - if so I would be hardly surprised)delphiandomine

welcome to the PO run country where policemen have to buy electric bulbs and toilet paper for their offices themselves

Were things really different under the SLD and PiS? Doesn't seem so...

there was significant decline in crime during PiS mostly due the export of louts to the UK - there was no shortage of basic stuff in the police during PiS government - maybe this is just the case of affluent state of finances back then (the best economical period in free Poland so far) - and somehow the police seemed much more up to task back then

btw PO won an overwhelming victory in jails - over 90 per cent in almost every single jail

It's a very interesting statistic. I wonder why, given that there is/was barely any difference between the parties when it comes to justice, except PiS-led witchhunts?

maybe it is enough for some to hear 'Praw i Sprawiedliwość' - 'Law and justice' to be repulsed

btw do you call getting after those corrupt officials in the Treasury who granted tax breaks to people like Stokłosa a witchhunt -

Poland's National Prosecutor Janusz Kaczmarek found it disturbing that so long acted with impunity corrupt group of high -ranking officials of the Ministry of Finance and tax authorities . For bribes allows them to avoid or lowering taxes. Kilkusobowa group was arrested Tuesday.

The prosecutor Janusz Kaczmarek said in a Day Signals that the detained officials acted since the early 90's to 2002 , and also later . Guest Ones confirmed that the investigation appeared surname of the entrepreneur and former Senator Henry Stokłosy .

Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,163
6 Aug 2011 #9
Sources?

Are you for real ?
OP unique_username
7 Aug 2011 #10
can we get this back on track & keep the politics to another thread?

I think the Poles have no respect for the police/straz mieska in general.

Just look at how idiots park their cars with no respect for other ppl needing to park. Parking enforcement where I live is a joke. The "enforcers" won't even cite someone parked on the hashmarks or in a zebra.

My city should really buy some tow trucks and start impounding offenders. That would create some good revenue for the city and tow companies and maybe change the way ppl think.

How seriously can you take a policeman when he is pulling you over holding a 25cm long white lollipop with a red center waving it around inside his car? I just laugh everytime I see it on tv

"Look at me!! I have this magic lollipop and you must obey me!!" Just watch Uwaga Pirat"
Seanus 15 | 19,706
7 Aug 2011 #11
They have, over the years, traditionally been suspicious of the police. Going to the police with info is not so easy here. Are they gutless? Without their weapons, I guess many are.
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
7 Aug 2011 #12
I think the Poles have no respect for the police/straz mieska in general.

Straz miejska it is another story. We find them as lazy drones who get this job by nepotism.

We have no respect for the Police because we don't feel threatened by the gun crime, shooting, armed robbery etc. We forget the fact that they are needed all the time even nothing has happen yet.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
7 Aug 2011 #13
peter_olsztyn wrote:

We have no respect for the Police because we don't feel threatened by the gun crime, shooting, armed robbery etc.

so what you're saying is that they're not respected because they don't put themselves at risk for the general public? if there was an increase in violent crime in poland, the police would gain more respect?
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
7 Aug 2011 #14
if there was an increase in violent crime in poland, the police would gain more respect?

Yes. I think (if whenever) violent crime in Poland increase, people will want someone to protect them. Someone who stand against the bullets.


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