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Is it worth returning to Poland in old age?


Alien 12 | 1,952
17 Aug 2022 #1
What speaks for and what against returning to Poland in the old age?
jon357 71 | 21,003
17 Aug 2022 #2
For: your pension will probably go further.
Against: healthcare is probably much poorer than where you are now.

For: one of the first things to go if/when you become senile is languages other than your first.
Against: people your age will seem older than you.
OP Alien 12 | 1,952
17 Aug 2022 #3
Some from Germany are coming back, but I have already met many who have moved in their old years from west Germany to east Germany near the Polish border, e.g. to Görlitz.
cms neuf - | 2,208
17 Aug 2022 #4
For - more natural food and access to fresh air
Against - less organized things for old people, no art groups or evening classes though those things are starting out now
Marynka11 4 | 677
17 Aug 2022 #5
Where is your family, your children, grandchildren? I wouldn't want to move far away from my family in the old age.
OP Alien 12 | 1,952
17 Aug 2022 #6
@cms neuf
Fresh air in Poland?
@Marynka11
Children will stay in Germany.
Cargo pants 3 | 1,192
6 Sep 2022 #7
returning to Poland in the old age

At one time we were thinking to move there,but we changed as kids dont want to come there and I dont speak Polish.We would totally get out of Poland but the $ is so strong.At one point we were thinking of buying a small 10/15 people senior residence(Dom Seniora,I think in Polish) for ourselves in west of Poland,where the Germans would be our clients.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
6 Sep 2022 #8
I would if Poland switched to English and restroom ladies were sent to Siberia for the pain and suffering they inflicted on those who were not able to pay.
pawian 194 | 19,807
6 Sep 2022 #9
Is it worth returning to Poland in old age?

Yes, always. I did after spending some time in America. Poland is the best.
pawian 194 | 19,807
6 Sep 2022 #10
And Cojest also did after spending 29 years in America. When in America, he was Iron, but became Cojest upon return. Amasing! A transformation like in an old TV cartoon of the early 80s - the Battle of the Planets!



Cargo pants 3 | 1,192
6 Sep 2022 #11
. I did after spending some time in America.

I remember in 80s,I once sent maybe 20 sponsorships to my wifes village and most people got Visas,some are citizens now,some got deported,and some left for Poland voluntarily.But the village now has beautiful houses.Those days as I remember Poles who left there family back usually wanted to make 10k to 15k USD and go back home.Two sisters of my wife also went back to retire comfortably with there husbands.They took there cars and household stuff from here in containers and when here.they were building beautiful houses there.Now they are living a very comfortable life with there savings and almost 2kUsd each a month pension.They could never live like that in US.Now there kids who are born in the US are here and most plan to do the same when they retire.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #12
Only childless losers return to Poland. By the time they are 70, normal people have kids, grandkids, a house on the lake, Medicare, and favorite restaurants. You are also supposed to be more fluent in English than the garbage language they left behind 50 years ago.

Many return to their memories, not the country they barely recognize - full of weirdly shaped glass buildings and moronic graffiti.

If after decades in the US, you are not "going home" from a trip to the old country, you should have never left the old country.
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #13
Only childless losers return to Poland

Some friends who'd left in the late 50s returned. They have a whole brood of kids and grandkids.

As for being losers? They'd sold a company with 3,000 staff before returning.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #14
They immigrated at 60 and went back home ten years later as multimillionaires. Oh, and left their kids and grandkids behind. Sure.
How do you come up with bs like this? Another PF poet?
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #15
How do you come up with bs like this?

Can you read?

In the 50s.

Not in their 50s.

Why do you come up with bs like this?

And their kids and grandkids (and great grandkids) are but a flight away.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #16
Can you read?

Yes, I can.
Now you are lying to make a point. You didn't say "in the 50s". You wrote:

in the late 50s

See the difference, English teacher?
The late 50s is 59 and 11 months. In the 50s is 50. That's almost a decade...Duh!

is but a flight away.

Proof that you don't have any. Paris is a flight away. Rio is a flight away. Families are a drive away and it should be an hour or less. Twice years might just as well be never.
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #17
Pull yourself together.

The not their.

Can't you read or are you just being contrary?

And your pathetic little attempt to introduce confusion diminishes you even further than we thought possible

BTW, the year was 1959.

Thinking about it, I know someone else who came back at about 70. He came with his wife who'd never lived in Poland.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #18
They'd sold a company with 3,000 staff before returning.

What is the name of that company?
"The" was from autocorrecting. I know the difference between the and their.

I know someone else who came back at about 70.

So what? My point is that such losers never made their new country their home. Instead, they spent many of their waking hour longing for the good parts of what they left behind.

Mentally, they never unpacked. A case of neither here nor there...
When they do come back, they discover that their old friends are sick or dead and have nothing in common with them.
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #19
such losers

Odd that you consider people who chose to retire to Poland as "losers".

made their new country their home

Both

they discover that their old friends are sick or dead

Both very much did and have retained real estate there.

Or perhaps they made new ones. Not all older people spend all day trolling the internet and being contrary.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #20
No sane person (1) leaves his kids 5000 miles behind to make "new friends" and (2) leaves the best country he chose to go to for the one he didn't like way back.

Name one good reason why moving back to Poland from the US is an improvement other than because the stubborn a-hole never learned English to make it his primary language.
OP Alien 12 | 1,952
7 Sep 2022 #21
@Novichok
Becouse a retirement home is cheaper in Poland.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #22
Finally, something that makes sense. It also supports my point that only losers go back.
If after all these years in the US you cannot live on your own till the end or cannot afford a decent retirement home you are a loser.

My guess is that some people go back because they are very ill and want to be buried where they were born. Just as my MIL's wish was to be buried in Illinois next to her husband rather than in Arkansas where she died.
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #23
leaves his kids 5000 miles

Since when has Spain been 5000 miles away?

stubborn a-hole

Describing yourself?
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #24
Since when has Spain been 5000 miles away?

I never mentioned Spain. I mentioned the US.

Name one good reason why moving back to Poland from the US is an improvement

You do know what "the US" in the quote above means?

English is now my primary language because I am not a stubborn Polish clinger. Is it yours?
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #25
I never mentioned Spain

And I never mentioned the US.

Neither of the couples you tried to imply were "losers" lived on that side of the Atlantic.

I also know a retired couple from Michigan with Polish roots who've. come to Warsaw to settle down. They prefer it.

"Scum" are those who fit the profile

No. They fit your profile better.

However that is for discussion in off topic.

If they took them back to Poland, it's a case of child abuse

Why? Many people do that. And the school system in Poland has higher levels of attainment than over there. And no school shootings either.
Novichok 2 | 7,564
7 Sep 2022 #26
Why? Many people do that.

Polish average wage is $15k. US - $60k. Prices - similar.
jon357 71 | 21,003
7 Sep 2022 #27
Polish average wage

Are we talking about people earning a salary at local levels?

And what makes you think that living on a decent Polish salary would be "child abuse"?

Don't feel you have to be so contrary. This is not your personal debating forum.
PolAmKrakow 2 | 2,762
8 Sep 2022 #28
@Novichok
Prices here are not similar to US with the exceptions of gasoline and housing in major cities. Even then housing is much lower within the city center. A million and a half zloty will get you an amazing apartment in Rynek in Krakow. That is roughly 350K USD. You could never get a new, high quality apartment in a comparable city in the US, for that kind of money. You might get a nice place, but not as big, and definitely not new.

Food is still less expensive even with inflation. Private health insurance is peanuts here. Going out to eat? Much cheaper. I can take my family out for 800 zloty for steak, wine, and great service where it would cost minimum 500 USD in Chicago or Las Vegas, in NYC it would cost at least 1000 USD.

If you have a passive income in the US, and good retirement money coming in, returning to any place in Poland you can live a lot better than in the US in terms of lifestyle and amenities. Spain, Portugal and other places, even better. But as with any relocation, whether its Florida or Europe, there will be drawbacks.
OP Alien 12 | 1,952
8 Sep 2022 #30
1000 USD plus 20% Tip for going out to eat is only a joke? Or is it a price for 10 people?


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