The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 35

Poland's Prison System Compared to America's


johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 May 2017 #1
What Pol3 said about America's prisons is true.

The luxuries in the prison system

You forgot about the major recreational drug abuse in American prisons though Pol.
And let's not forget the American Civil Liberties Union that represent these guys for free if they have a legitimate gripe.

jon is it true what you said in this post ?
Are Polish prisons really as bad as Mexican prisons ?

I await the day you end up locked away in a dingy cell eating stale bread and rotten onions with Radio Zet blaring day and night and no proper mattress or pillow locked up with lowlife, once weekly showers and a twice monthly visit, all on a miscarriage of justice or momentary lapse of judgement.

How much of this is just your creative imagination jon ? or is it first hand experience ?
Joker 1 | 1,073
5 May 2017 #2
It must be a slow Fake News Day:)

This fable is almost as good as when Hillary Clinton came under sniper fire...LoL
Joker 1 | 1,073
5 May 2017 #3
How much of this is just your creative imagination jon ? or is it first hand experience ?

It could be one of his fantasies as well!:)
OP johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 May 2017 #4
I am serious about this Joker.
I could feel jon's emotions when he said, "all on a miscarriage of justice or momentary lapse of judgment."
If you have ever been incarcerated you would know exactly what he means.
I just am in disbelief that Poland would run such institutions in this day and age that he has described.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
5 May 2017 #5
Poland would run such institutions

From the programs I have watched on tv and from discussions with one or two ex ganga growers here Polish prisons are still proper prisons like the uk in the early 50s, and long may it continue, criminals are given tough sentances here and prison guards are usualy fit ex military personel. the guard dogs are trained to go for the testicles and not the arm.

dont comit crime in Poland

Take a look below

dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3442916/What-life-like-inside-one-world-s-toughest-prisons.html
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #6
How a justice system treats people is a measure of a civilised society. Whether it's rehabilitation or just locking someone away. In America, there seems to be a disproportionally high percentage of people in prison compared with Europe.

In Poland they do try - and the EU have made sure conditions have slightly improved, however are stymied by lack of funds. Custodial sentences are still given for minor offences here, with little thought to any long-term benefit to society. Prison certainly isn't a deterrent, since crime still occurs.

or is it first hand experience ?

Decades of prison visiting as a volunteer here, plus having worked in one elsewhere.
Joker 1 | 1,073
5 May 2017 #7
Some interesting statistics from the Federal Bureau of Prisons
bop.gov/about/statistics/statistics_inmate_citizenship.jsp
Most people are incarcerated for drug offenses. This doesn't include state and county jails either.

Decades of prison visiting as a volunteer here, plus having worked in one elsewhere.

I spent a few days in cook county jail in Chicago. It`s the worst jail in the country.

This was when I was much younger, never will forget it, totally messed up people. I seen a guard smash a guys face into a wall.

Not to mention its very humiliating and they treat you like an animal!

I decide to stay out of trouble after that....lol
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #8
Rehab and/or legalisation is almost certainly cheaper and more humane in the long run. When we think about someone sent to prison for whatever, we often forget about the effect it has on the whole family.
Joker 1 | 1,073
5 May 2017 #9
Rehab and/or legalisation is almost certainly cheaper and more humane in the long run

Some of these less violent criminals, like drug offenders should be in these programs instead of clogging up the system.

Its very expensive to the tax payers.

forget about the effect it has on the whole family

It is very sad, go visit someone at a prison its like being at a funeral without being searched.

As for violent criminals, we really don't have a choice but to keep them off the streets.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
5 May 2017 #10
we often forget about the effect it has on the whole family.

Why should it be our concern, the criminal should have thought through these consequences before commiting the crime.

As for cheaper methods, prisons should be outsourced to cheaper countries (sentances greater than 3 years), such as India and China, the cost of shipping would be far outwheighd by the savings made on their day to day incarceration. As for family contact Skype sessions would be their friend.

As for rehab in my opinion it works on only a very few individuals, a sharp shock in a foreign prison may benefit some of the repeat offenders, if not the cost of locking them up will not be such a burden on the hard working tax payers.
Joker 1 | 1,073
5 May 2017 #11
outsourced to cheaper countries (sentances greater than 3 years), such as India and China

Im sure that would make them think twice before committing a crime!
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #12
As for cheaper methods, prisons should be outsourced to cheaper countries

So you want to bring transportation back? We stopped that in the Nineteenth Century.

Im sure that would make them think twice before committing a crime!

Decades in Sing Sing certainly doesn't.
OP johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 May 2017 #13
Decades of prison visiting as a volunteer here, plus having worked in one elsewhere.

Ah ha, I knew that I detected someone who knew the gut wrenching of lost souls.
Most of the prisoners I met were very uneducated or so far down on their luck they felt hopeless and didn't care anymore.
These people are targets for law enforcement and the legal system for two reasons in America.
The first is they know these people don't have the money to defend themselves with a good lawyer making for an easy conviction. $$$$$
In essence they are given a "public pretender" by the courts to represent them.
These lawyers get paid minimum (by the courts) so they don't put any effort into representing the victims.
The second reason is the prison system does not like violent criminals, they like non violent people like drug users/growers, back child support, etc.

This makes THEIR JOBS much easier and safer.
This makes for easy revenue and job security for the system. $$$$$
It's all about money and like jon said, NOTHING to do with rehabilitation as most come out of the joint much more hardcore then when they went in creating a repeat offender.

Being a lot of the prisons in America are 'privately owned and run' it has become BIG BUSINESS $$$$$ and that is why there are so many youth in prisons in America........they can't afford to defend themselves.

Is Poland like this also ?
Does Poland have privately owned prisons ?
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
5 May 2017 #14
These people are targets for law enforcement and the legal system for two reasons in America.

No its not like that in Poland nor in any other EU member state
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #15
The first is they know these people don't have the money to defend themselves with a good lawyer making for an easy conviction. $$$$$

Yes, similar in most of Europe. In America, the system of elected judges and prosecutors is also a factor.

The second reason is the prison system does not like violent criminals, they like non violent people like drug users/growers, back child support, etc.

Same in Poland. Plus the organised criminals and their gangs have connections that put them almost above the law. That and the fact that some of the worst offenders have or have had mental health issues that the prison system doesn't want to deal with. These people have a card that mentions this. They are just driven to hospital by police and discharged a couple of days later.

Does Poland have privately owned prisons ?

I don't think so. Polish prisons do try to rehabilitate people, however there are vested interests among bureaucrats to keep things as they are and an unpleasant prison culture. Plus low staffing levels, low budgets and corruption.

In Germany and Holland they do it very well.
OP johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 May 2017 #16
The federal prisons like Pol3 said are decked out with workout courts, basketball courts, exercise rooms, hot showers every day, clean towels and bedding because they have laundry rooms where you are allowed to do your own personal laundry in many low risk prisons.

They have cable t.v. and the food is of medium grade.
There are security camera's everywhere for the prisoners safety too.
Many prisons in America for the rich prisoners who have high priced attorney's representing them get put in what are called "Country Clubs" prisons when the attorney is paid a lot of money to get their guilty as hell client off, but can't, so in return the judge sentences the rich guy to a plush prison in hopes of a large campaign contribution for re election from the attorney. $$$$$$

I just wondered if the legal system is as crooked in Poland as it is in the U.S.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
5 May 2017 #17
The federal prisons like Pol3 said are decked out with workout courts, basketball courts, exercise rooms, hot showers every day, clean towels and beddings.

so, you have been inside then Johnny?..:):)
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #18
Some of the very best people have, others have supported loved ones inside (you maybe know about this), others have worked in them :-)
jon357 63 | 14,148
5 May 2017 #20
See above ;-)

I just wondered if the legal system is as crooked in Poland as it is in the U.S.

Probably far worse, except there's no federal/state distinction. Prison inmates in Poland often get relatives to move to one of several towns in order to qualify for a transfer there to a local prison where they have a greater chance of release under licence due to overcrowding or allegedly a discreet bribe that certain lawyers specialise in arranging.
OP johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 May 2017 #21
a discreet bribe that certain lawyers specialise in arranging.

I am VERY aware of what you are talking about as it happens here too. $$$$$$
Money can't buy happiness but it sure the hell greases the wheels.

Plus the organised criminals and their gangs have connections that put them almost above the law.

There is no "almost" about it, they ARE in many situations.
There are three types of gangs in the Federal prisons in the U.S.A.
The Whites, the Blacks and the Latino's.
The Latino's are most vicious, dangerous and feared by far.
Many Federal guards refuse to work in prisons with high Latino populations.
Their connections on the inside and outside are unbelievable.
Like they say, "the inmates run the asylum."

been inside then Johnny?

Do I act like I have been rehabilitated ? :-)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
5 May 2017 #22
Rehabilitation is a farce. Only a fraction follow the straight nad narrow after their release. Most make new contacts in prison, cook up plans and think up new ways to commit "the perfect crime". Only a libtard could speak of revenge and advocate molly-coddling ruthless, hardened criminals.* Penal as in penal system refers to punishment, and a prison is not a health resort. A less-frills, more hard work regimen might serve as a deterrent and decrease the recidivism rate.

*LATEST NEWS: This just in! A prison van has collided wiht a cement truck and a dozen detainees have escaped. Be on hte look-out for 12 hardened criminals!
TheOther 5 | 3,831
5 May 2017 #23
Rehabilitation is a farce.

Has the death penalty ever prevented a murder? Is the Three Strikes Law really working in states like California? Nope.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
5 May 2017 #24
Has the death penalty ever prevented a murder?

Of course it has plenty of murderers have been released to murder AGAIN see a few below

dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2421724/Revealed-The-murderers-given-life-jail-freed-kill-again.html

If they were dead innocent others would still be alive.
TheOther 5 | 3,831
6 May 2017 #25
If they were dead innocent others would still be alive.

Well, that comes with the death penalty, doesn't it? What I meant is something else: is the death penalty really a deterrence for someone who is about to kill another person? The answer is no, as the murder rate in the USA clearly shows.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
6 May 2017 #26
Everyone yamps on about the murder rate in America, but there are shed loads of people in America, If you start looking at murder rates per capita America is ranked at number 108 out of 218 countries.

There are more murders per capita in Turkey, Ukrain,Bermuda, Argentina and Russia but to name a few, but ask anyone on the street where the murders are they say America, oh and just to mention the aforesaid countries have much tighter gun control laws than America

Btw Poland is ranked at 200 out of 218 so pretty safe when it comes to chances of being murdered

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate
dolnoslask 5 | 2,413
6 May 2017 #27
So you want to bring transportation back? We stopped that in the Nineteenth Century.

So there is no reason not bring it back albeit a slightly updated version, You never know we might have mini Australias in China and India.

Look at Australia today it is a fine example of how deportation has been a success in the past,
TheOther 5 | 3,831
6 May 2017 #28
If you start looking at murder rates per capita America is ranked at number 108 out of 218 countries

That was not the point, Dolnoslask. The question was whether the death penalty is deterrent enough to keep people from killing each other or not, and it clearly isn't. Regarding the murder rate: you should compare the USA to other first world countries, not to some crime infested dump in South America, Africa or Asia. Although, at the moment the country's murder rate is similar to Kyrgyzstan's, Burundi's or Iran's - which should tell you something.
OP johnny reb 18 | 3,683
6 May 2017 #29
Where did you get off topic at......ah yes, about six posts ago.
Are Polish prisoners allowed to smoke cigarettes while incarcerated ?
American prisoners are not allowed to.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
6 May 2017 #30
the USA to other first world countries

Racial minorities, specifically N-words, who account for no more than 13% of the US populaiton, constitute 38% of the country's prison inmates. That tells us something. Of course lefty libtards will claim that only proves the US justice system discrimnates against them. But no matter how one slices it, the fact remains that ******* do disproprotionately to their actual numerical strength commit the most crimes. Comparing multi-culti countries to those with a more homogeneous population might be eye-opening. The problem is that there will be fewer of the latter if the Merkelite Third-World welcomers get their way.


Home / Life / Poland's Prison System Compared to America's
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.