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St Patrick's day in Poland


isthatu2 4 | 2,703
16 Mar 2011 #61
By whom exactly? Sounds like a line from a crap movie.

yeah,but the soundtrack was pretty cool ;)

Who has been more successful? So it seems the opposite people who score low on Emotional intelligence & High on Iq are most likely to go far & are the ones who drive our society.

Look,face it,if the sun shone out of every Poles arse as you seem to think well why the heck do so many end up in ireland doing the proverbial bog cleaning?

well it is not the Irish in England who are filling up the jails, living 10 to a room, stabbing "niggers" and eating swans for breakfast, now is it?

Well I did live 6 in a room for a few weeks as an 18 year old hippy in the 90s...1 hour in the Police cells...stabbed a horrible girl with a pencil when I was 7 and had quails eggs for breakfast occasionally :)

fakebogtrotter4ever ,what can be added here? Sad sad wee man. Is your real name Billy?
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
16 Mar 2011 #62
Most Irish don't even drink beer..

Consumption per capita [1] Rank↓ Country↓ Consumption
(litres)↓ 2003-2004
change
(633 mL
bottles)↓ Total national consumption
(in ML)[B]

1 Czech Republic 158.6
2 Ireland 131.1
3 Germany 110
4 Austria 108.3
5 Australia 104.7
6 United Kingdom 99.0
7 Poland 95
8 Denmark 89.9
9 Finland 85.0
10 Luxembourg84.4
11 Slovakia 84.1
12 Spain 83.8
13 United States81.6
14 Croatia 81.2
15 Belgium 81.0
16 Estonia 80
17 Netherlands77
18 Lithuania 76
19 New Zealand 75
20 Hungary 75.3
21 Canada 68.3
22 Latvia 68
23 South Africa 60
24 Portugal 59.6
25 Bulgaria 59.5
26 Russia 58.9
27 Venezuela 58.6
28 Romania 58.2
29 Cyprus 58.1
30 Switzerland57.3
31 Gabon 55.8
32 Norway 55.5
33 Mexico 51.8
34 Sweden 51.5
35 Japan 51.3
36 Brazil 47.6
37 Argentina 43.2
38 Namibia 40
39 South Korea 38.5
40 Colombia 36.8
41 China 30
42 Vietnam 19
43 Kenya 12
44 Uzbekistan 11[16]
45 Tanzania 8.4[10]
46 Uganda 6.0[10]
47 Sri Lanka 2.45[17] 50[17]
48 India 1.3[18]
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
16 Mar 2011 #63
pennboy wrote:

1 Czech Republic 158.6
2 Ireland 131.1
3 Germany 110

pretty amazing numbers considering Ireland only consists of 6.2 million people. yeah, i'd say that's evidence that the Irish pound a lot of beer.
Warszawski1
16 Mar 2011 #64
[quote=Teffle]I've said it before but I can guarantee you this guy is not even Irish. Not even a wannabe American plastic paddy. There are far too many giveaway signs in his posts. English is not his first language.[quote]

I have found "Ireland4ever" in this youtube video

youtube.com/watch?v=mH0TjR9tmPg
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
16 Mar 2011 #65
Tomorrow we'll all be wearing the green :)
pgtx 30 | 3,156
16 Mar 2011 #66
... and drinking green beer...
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
16 Mar 2011 #68
... and drinking green beer...

And hopefully seeing green panties ;)
Warszawski1
16 Mar 2011 #70
Preferebly on the rear of Cailín dathúil.
OP poland_
16 Mar 2011 #71
If you are looking for a good place on St Patrick's day.

Krakow

Irish Arms
Krupnicza 3
Kraków, Poland

theirisharms.net

Irish Mbssy
Stolarska 3
31-043 Kraków, Poland

irishmbassy.com/Krakow/EN/index.html

Warsaw

Jimmy Bradleys
Sienna 39
Warsaw, Poland

jimmybradleys.pl
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
16 Mar 2011 #72
If you are looking for a good place on St Patrick's day.

Do you speak Gaelic? it sounds interesting.

youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=bEgJyWaNoG0
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Mar 2011 #73
Warsaw

Is Molly Malone's in Warsaw any good?
OP poland_
16 Mar 2011 #74
I have never heard of "Molly Malones"

Just had a look at the site. I was in there about two months ago with Maurice, we stayed for a drink and then left sharpish. It is down in a basement, It used to be called " The Loch" and was a strip joint a number of years back.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Mar 2011 #75
Just had a look at the site.

me too, it's not Irish owned and they made many basic mistakes on their site e.g. Irish Whisky (no"E")

A friend said she was going there tomorrow, so I will pass on your recommendation for Jimmy Bradleys, thanks for the tip!

Do you speak Gaelic? it sounds interesting.

Every Irish national in Ireland must learn Irish in school.
Unfortunately the way most of us were taught was using the "Latin method" which is probably the worst method there is but that is changing with Irish T.V. and radio getting better and the general attitude towards learning it.

One of the impacts Poles had in emigrating to Ireland was showing Irish people what they had and since then, there has been a huge upsurge in learning Irish/ Before there were very few foreigners in Ireland, like Poland is now. (no doubt the trolls will twist that but to hell with the begrudgers, it's all good!)

Ireland's official languages are English and Irish, every public servant and sign has to be in both languages.

There are areas that only speak Irish, I got extra tuition from a lady who had to learn English when she moved to Dublin.

It really is a beautiful language, you might think I am bias and I may well be but it still doesn't stop me from thinking it's a beautiful language.
OP poland_
17 Mar 2011 #76
A friend said she was going there tomorrow, so I will pass on your recommendation for Jimmy Bradleys, thanks for the tip!

The only two Irish owned places I know of in Warsaw,

Jimmy Bradleys - Irish bar and sportbar

Tortilla Factory - Mexican Restaurant and bar owned by a Dub
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #77
One of the impacts Poles had in emigrating to Ireland was showing Irish people what they had and since then.

Yea everyone in Ireland should know it fluently, be proud you have your own language and don't forget it.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
17 Mar 2011 #78
General question - what are "Irish pubs" like in Poland?

Only ever been to one (called, funny enough, Irish pub) and it was, well...a pub basically. And that's it. Dark wood, leather, that kind of thing - just an old style pub but nothing identifiable about it.

But maybe this idea of a pub is quite different from the Polish norm?

In fact, I think I remember hearing that pubs as the Irish would know them are a relatively new concept in Poland in that traditionally they were very rough and ready "drinking houses" basically - old men and alcos - and that people tended to drink in hotels - true?
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #79
Finnigans Wake is a nice pub we've got here in Philadelphia tons of people every weekend not just St.Patrick's Day.

youtube.com/watch?v=XoKthbH6YKQ
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
17 Mar 2011 #80
There used to be Morgans. Not just in Warsaw but in Krakow and Poznań. Morgans was in the cellars of the Chopin Museum on ul. Tamka. The Poznań one was between the Rynek and my flat, but never really took off much.
OP poland_
17 Mar 2011 #81
very rough and ready "drinking houses" basically - old men and alcos - and that people tended to drink in hotels - true?

Have a look at the links above to get an idea. Here is my two penneth, there are two types of Iris pub in PL, the first is Irish owned and they target the expat crowd, Polish middle class and tourists ( stags). The second type is the Polish bar that is looking for some sort of identity, so they stick Irish pub in the front and hope they catch some stragglers along the way.

There used to be Morgans. Not just in Warsaw but in Krakow and Poznań. Morgans was in the cellars of the Chopin Museum on ul. Tamka. The Poznań one was between the Rynek and my flat, but never really took off much.

So you know Sean as well Jonnym?
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #82
For Irish people (I'm not gonna ask my Irish American friends because that's different) but for Irish nationals is St. Patrick's on the same level as your independence day, or is it something different?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
17 Mar 2011 #83
Very different - in that there is no official independence day as such.

Or maybe you meant "our" instead of "your" ?

For adults, basically, it's a party day, and that's it. For kids and people who have them it's parades and stuff but with only a very vague national aspect to it. In fact to be honest, in some cases, the curiosity factor of US marching bands coming over to participate (which they do, often, in a cheerleader type of way) is a big novelty and a little bemusing, but welcome.

Any true meaning or whatever is out the window in practice.
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #84
For adults, basically, it's a party day, and that's it. For kids and people who have them it's parades and stuff but with only a very vague national aspect to it. In fact to be honest, in some cases, the curiosity aspect of US marching bands coming over to participate

In America the brave Patty's (or Plastic Patty's if you wanna be an ass about it lol) take the day off from work and party all day long during the late evening everyone drives around honking their horns celebrating it's actually more felt than 4th of July.
OP poland_
17 Mar 2011 #85
There used to be Morgans

Jonnym- Here is the story- There was one Ollie Morgan (Irish Ambassador), who came to Warsaw back in the day( early 90's) and opened up a bar on Smilana it was a toilet, but they came from far and wide, Oliie asked his two sons to come over from Ireland, T and M, then they opened Tamka. Business was going well so they decided to branch out and the third son came over S, they opened up Poznan,Katowice and Krakow. They were ahead of their time in PL, the only pub that was doing well was Krakow. A few years later the "Irish Ambassador" died and two of the sons went back to Ireland with their Polish wives. One of the lads stayed and built up Krakow. That is the legacy of Ollie Morgan AKA The Irish Ambassador.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
17 Mar 2011 #86
Same thing then really Pennboy! LOL

And no I won't be an ass about it, but please for the love of god, don't say Patty to any Irish person. I can't explain it but it just sounds awful - Patrick or Paddy. No other variation is tolerated!

I dunno - it's probably like saying "Indo day" or something - but maybe you say that?!
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #87
And no I won't be an ass about it, but please for the love of god, don't say Patty to any Irish person. I can't explain it but it just sounds awful - Patrick or Paddy. No other variation is tolerated!

I meant Paddy (misspelling) forgive me i've had a few pints tonight LOL
There are some 40 million Irish Americans in this country i work with a few real Irish nationals who just came over like 5 years ago, really nice people, young entrepreneurs starting their own companies want to make it big in America.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
17 Mar 2011 #88
Well as it is officially St Patrick's day here and now - Sláinte !

(Jesus it's all BS anyway - I mean , as I type, I'm drinking American beer and will be going out of my way to avoid all festivities later today)
OP poland_
17 Mar 2011 #89
Patty

Pennyboy, Patty is a girls name. (diminutive for Patricia)
PennBoy 76 | 2,436
17 Mar 2011 #90
I'm drinking American beer

Killian's Irish Red or real American Budweiser? ;)


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