The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered [2]  |  Archives [1] 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 81

Poland's concord of cultures


pawian 150 | 7,966    
17 Sep 2012  #1
After a great success of the following thread

Fiat Poland

Brits had their Mini Morris 15 years before.

The Mini is a small economy car that was made by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) and its successors from 1959 until 2000. The original is considered a British icon of the 1960s,[3][4][5] and its space-saving front-wheel drive layout - allowing 80 per cent of the area of the car's floorpan to be used for passengers and luggage - influenced a generation of car makers.[6] The vehicle is in some ways considered the British equivalent of its German contemporary the Volkswagen Beetle, which enjoyed similar popularity in North America. In 1999 the Mini was voted the second most influential car of the 20th century, behind the Ford Model T.[7][8]

Children in Poland and US (probably UK too) liked to watch slide films on home projectors. I remember those shows as one of the happiest moments in my childhood. I will tell you my secret: today, I recreate those moments reading slide films to my kids on weekend evenings.

Polish slide film projector, late 1950s:
Harry    
18 Sep 2012  #2
Brits had their Mini Morris 15 years before.

That's actually a Mini-Minor, a common mistake in Poland and useful when it comes to parking tickets.
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
18 Sep 2012  #3
My bad, but, actually, who cares about it? :):):):)

Arguments in Polish Parliament

s

Hot exchanges in British Parliament

s

s

youtube.com/watch?v=vaPCf-m0zR4
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,378    
23 Sep 2012  #4
Arguments in Polish Parliament

The thing about the UK, is that they do it all for show, they know that PMQs is all about the performance. Most Labour MPs get along very well with the Tories privately. In Poland on the other hand, most PIS MPs genuinely hate PO MPs, publicly and privately.
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
23 Sep 2012  #5
Right. Then, m the parliament comparison should be in another thread, Clash of cultures.

Most Labour MPs get along very well with the Tories privately

One day such relations will also happen in Poland, we just need to wait:
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
1 Oct 2012  #7
I read that Brits like to moan.

I'm British right, but I'm getting tired of people in this country moaning & complaining all the time. Why is that? I suppose it's better to be like this have the American attitude whereby everything is 'awesome' when in reality it's probable crap.

scribd.com/doc/24569337/8-Things-British-Like-to-Complain-A bout

Poles are also said to love complaining.

The Art of Complaining by Polish people

Wonderful concord of cultures?
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
1 Oct 2012  #8
We are one tribe seperated by language and milk or not in our Tea.
We both come from the cold wet edges of Europe and plough our own paths through life,anoying the hell out of everyone else around us (you have the germans,we have the french...)as we do it but never really wanting to offend ,well,not all of the time :)

BTW paw, the bloke,second photo down in the British House of Commons, did you pick him deliberatly?
He is about the only politician who lives by what he preaches,he only accepts the avarage wage of his constituents which,considering he represents a fairly poor area means he gives up a big chunk of his pay just to be *real*. Top bloke, the right hate him :)
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
1 Oct 2012  #9
We are one tribe seperated by language and milk or not in our Tea.

Don`t forget the Grande La Manche Canal!

BTW paw, the bloke,second photo down in the British House of Commons, did you pick him deliberatly?

Yes, I did, but today I don`t remember why.

I see a little clash of native opinions.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
3 Oct 2012  #10
Not really, Im sure even " The Beast" gets on well with some Tories. You tend to find in British Politics that its internal party rivalries that are the deepest. He is far more likely to get on with an *honest* tory Posh Boy than some pretend *man of the people* on the pretend Left......
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
14 Oct 2012  #11
We all love our cats and dogs and other creatures:

s

s
Orpheus - | 114    
15 Oct 2012  #12
He is far more likely to get on with an *honest* tory Posh Boy than some pretend *man of the people* on the pretend Left......

I remember hearing Denis Skinner speak at the Durham Miners' Gala years ago. He launched into a withering and very funny tirade against Tony Blair. A real old English socialist who practises what he preaches.

Tony Blair

Now I think about it, it was Neil Kinnock. I must be older than I thought.
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
9 Jan 2013  #13
Hey, it is unfair. The Clash of Cultures thread reached over 250 posts while here it is so sluggish. Are there really no more concords? Expats, what did you find the same or very similar in Poland?

Has this book been ever mentioned in the PF?

Carp in the Bathtub, Throttled Buglers, and other Tales of an Englishman in Poland

Are you travelling to Poland, and wish to know more about the Poles you'll encounter? Are you fascinated by this country of forty million, rich in natural beauty, cultured, and famous for its people's wanderlust? Have you ever wondered what makes your Polish plumber or waitress or doctor over here tick? What book do you pick for background and insight? A superficial travel guide? A dry history book? No! You need the genre-busting Polska Dotty. Follow the hilarious exploits of a newly-wed English lad and Polish girl as they settle in Poland and encounter corrupt Polish police, counterfeit software sellers, and scammy private doctors.


An example of concord according to the author: Both Poles and Brits are clever and creative.
Bieganski 17 | 906    
9 Jan 2013  #14
what did you find the same or very similar

The police in both Poland and Britain often wear yellow reflective vests when on duty in public even during daylight hours and when the weather is clear and visibility is good.

Polish policeman wearing a yellow reflective vest:

Polish policeman on duty protecting young members of the public in his community

British policeman wearing a yellow reflective vest:

British bobby on the beat.
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
10 Jan 2013  #15
The police in both Poland and Britain often wear yellow reflective vests when on duty in public even during daylight hours and when the weather is clear and visibility is good.

AAAh, yes!! I completely forgot about it!!

British policeman wearing a yellow reflective vest:

Excuse me, but your choice of pictures might arouse a suspicion in some posters that you tend to be a bit prejudiced......
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
10 Jan 2013  #16
Dont worry, we Brits will not be offended.
After all,where he lives the Police need Shotguns and Glocks for riot control while our *brutal Police* use a plastic stick and some rather coarse language :)
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
10 Jan 2013  #17
Dont worry, we Brits will not be offended.

Is, BiegaƄski is more British than Polish, don`t offend him.

*brutal Police* use a plastic stick and some rather coarse language :)

You mean:In the name of Queen Elizabeth II, I am placing you under arrest???? :):):)
Bieganski 17 | 906    
10 Jan 2013  #18
Excuse me, but your choice of pictures might arouse a suspicion in some posters that you tend to be a bit prejudiced......

I don't see why. I merely juxtaposed two images of reality showing common uniform items worn by police engaging with members of the communities they serve.

Notice too the similar black visored cap styles worn by both police officers.

After all,where he lives the Police need Shotguns and Glocks for riot control while our *brutal Police* use a plastic stick and some rather coarse language :)

The Polish police use shotguns:

Polish police with shotguns

Krakow police with shotguns

So do the British police:

Manchester police sackings follow misuse with shotgun.

So, you were saying?

Anyway, if you doubt the authenticity of the last photo then you can read more about here from a British rag:
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
10 Jan 2013  #19
Hey, it is unfair. The Clash of Cultures thread reached over 250 posts while here it is so sluggish. Are there really no more concords? Expats, what did you find the same or very similar in Poland?

Probably, writing about obvious things is boring.

But, let`s try.

Both British and Poles have fascinating history.

s

Well, Americans and Australians, too, but less fascinating than the two above.

s
Bieganski 17 | 906    
11 Jan 2013  #20
Both British and Poles have fascinating history.

Indeed. Not only are they both port and coastal nations with longstanding seafaring traditions but each have established networks of canals used for both inland commerce and tourism.

Polish Canals
British Canals

Courtesy: worldcanals
TheOther 5 | 3,679    
11 Jan 2013  #21
but each have established networks of canals used for both inland commerce

Who built most of those canals in Poland?
jon357 64 | 14,382    
11 Jan 2013  #22
Poland always feels far less of a coastal nation and those few canals that exist aren't used nearly as much.

If you're looking for an interesting concord, England as the major part of an island has always been a great seafaring nation but lacks hardwood to build ships. For centuries it was imported from Poland, so much so that the word spruce is derived from z Prus.
OP pawian 150 | 7,966    
11 Jan 2013  #23
endeed. Not only are they both port and coastal nations with longstanding seafaring traditions

Hey, that is really good!

However, Polish seafaring traditions are contained within the distance of 100 miles on average. British ones are a little bit further.
Let me guess. 300?

but each have established networks of canals used for both inland commerce and tourism.

I would never come upon this idea. Thanks.

Who built most of those canals in Poland?

Aborigines???
Bieganski 17 | 906    
11 Jan 2013  #24
Who built most of those canals in Poland?

From a quick search it seems the Prussians were busy in their day doing the digging. This would make sense during the times of partition.

But alas, the Prussians are no more.

Still, old Blighty always talks about "Roman Britain", "Viking Britian", etc. and sees constructions and developments from those disparate eras as a series of strands woven in the tapestry of their nation today.

Regardless of who built them they weren't filled in with earth. They are still there and in use; some more so than others.

Many countries have canals and many fell into disuse when rail and road took over. But some canals have been reopened mainly for tourism but I understand there is interest in reusing canals for commerce to help reduce carbon emissions.
TheOther 5 | 3,679    
11 Jan 2013  #25
Aborigines?

That's why Poles have such a dark skin... ;)

Still, old Blighty always talks about "Roman Britain", "Viking Britian", etc. and sees constructions and developments from those disparate eras as a series of strands woven in the tapestry of their nation today.

Poland should do the same, but before they acknowledge something like "Prussian Poland", "German Poland", "Russian Poland" (just following your wording from above here), hell will probably freeze over.
Bieganski 17 | 906    
11 Jan 2013  #26
However, Polish seafaring traditions are contained within the distance of 100 miles on average. British ones are a little bit further. Let me guess. 300?

I would say Poland's seafaring traditions have spanned the globe over the ages.

Polish ships and crews were an integral part of the Allied effort during WWII:

"Last night I asked my Chief of Staff to give me a list of all Polish warships fighting alongside the Royal Navy. I was shocked to learn how few they are because in all dispatches of naval operations and major engagements I almost always find a name of a Polish ship that distinguished itself." - Sir Dudley Pound, the British First Sea Lord who decorated several Polish sailors in 1942 for their valor.

Source: polishgreatness.blogspot.com/2012/05/battle-of-atlantic-part-1-terror-on.html

Not only has Poland been a shipbuilding nation but Poland is still an active competitor in the global shipping sector. One such Polish company is POLSTEAM.

polsteam.com/offer

Unfortunately the global travels of Poland's fishing fleet only comes to light in a bad news story:

community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=19960616&slug=2334875 - Polish Trawler Found Illegally Fishing Off Alaska Is Seized

And although millions of Poles were never sailors they wouldn't have made it to the Americas and elsewhere during the 20th century and prior if they had a fear of the sea and setting foot on a ship.
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
11 Jan 2013  #27
Still, old Blighty always talks about "Roman Britain",

I live a couple of miles from a Roman Canal oddly enough :)
AFAIK there were Poles with Nelsons Fleet at Trafalgar. Not many as most Poles fought on Napoleons side but still, they were there :)

Odd concord though, wikki London sewers and Warsaw sewers ;)
Ok, both cities systems were designed by British engineers, one basicaly copied the other and both cities now run tours of their historic sewer networks :)

Still, old Blighty always talks about "Roman Britain", "Viking Britian", etc. and sees constructions and developments from those disparate eras as a series of strands woven in the tapestry of their nation today.

*We* dont really think of them as invaders though as they more or less assimilated with the existing cultures. I can see why many Poles shy away from speaking of a Russian or Saxon period etc. Though I have to say friends in Krakow still speak of the Austro Hungarian period fondly.
TheOther 5 | 3,679    
11 Jan 2013  #28
I can see why many Poles shy away from speaking of a Russian or Saxon period etc.

Of course, but isn't that also a sign that Poland still isn't able to deal with its past in a normal manner? Nobody can deny the great influence (positive and negative) that its neighbors had on Poland and her culture, so why try to pretend that there never was a Russian, Prussian or German era in Polish history?
isthatu2 4 | 2,708    
11 Jan 2013  #29
Poland still isn't able to deal with its past?

Poland was still occupied when I was 15 years old,my country was last occupied in 1066........ Ive got no judgements on why some Poles may or may not be happy to speak of the *glories* of old Russia or Prussia TBH .
TheOther 5 | 3,679    
11 Jan 2013  #30
my country was last occupied in 1066.

It took us until 1986 to get rid of the British meddling in our internal affairs... :)

Ive got no judgements on why some Poles may or may not be happy to speak of the *glories* of old Russia or Prussia TBH .

I don't judge either, but sometimes it helps to ask questions.


Home / Life / Poland's concord of cultures
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.