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Neugebauer surname in Poland / Nestor, Zurawel, Worobec, Atamanczuk in Galicia Poland


Ogien 6 | 245
4 Jan 2010  #1
Anyone have any information on people with the surname Neugebauer who immigrated from most likely Bavaria or Austria to Poland during the late 1800s or early 1900s?
Softsong 5 | 495
4 Jan 2010  #2
There was someone in the interwar government of Poland by that last name:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mieczyslaw_Norwid-Neugebauer
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
7 Jan 2010  #3
NEUGEBAUER: German or Yiddish (Askhenazy) name for a (largely unwelcome) new settler, newcomer or outsider.
OP Ogien 6 | 245
8 Jan 2010  #4
One of my ancestors had the name Neagebauer and she apparently was asked to sign some kind of document that stated she was loyal to Germany or something along those lines. Does that outrule the possibility that she was Jewish?
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,714
8 Jan 2010  #5
Neubauer Standes- oder Berufsname für den neu angesiedelten Bauern

It's not a jewish name....Jews weren't farmers...I don't know any Jew with the name of Neubauer/Neugebauer.

NEUGEBAUER: German or Yiddish (Askhenazy) name for a (largely unwelcome) new settler, newcomer or outsider.

What makes you say "unwelcome"?
The name just states a fact: "neuer Bauer (new farmer) - Neubauer/Neugebauer"

...
Jemand, der als neuer Bürger in eine Gemeinschaft hineinkam, ein Neuling, Neuankömmling, konnte einen Beinamen erhalten, der auf diesen Umstand Bezug nahm. Eine sehr große Zahl von Familiennamen ist so entstanden, die einfachste Namensform ist Neu, mundartlich Ney, Nigge, Naue, auch Neue und Neuer gehören dazu. Der einfache Name Nee weist ein deutliches Zentrum im Landkreis Emsland auf, in der Rangliste der häufigsten Familiennamen im Emsland belegt Nee Platz 25.

noz.de/lokales/osnabrueck/artikel/318085/ein-nee-ist-kein-nein-name-bezeichnet-neuling
OP Ogien 6 | 245
8 Jan 2010  #6
I don't know any Jew with the name of Neubauer/Neugebauer.

I did some research on the name and it mentioned that it can be Ashkenazic but like you said it's unusual for a Jew to have that name for the fact that Jews weren't farmers.

With that said, Adolf Neubauer who was a rabbinical scholar in Britain, was a Jew.

I also know a guy in college who has the last name Neugebauer and he's Jewish.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
8 Jan 2010  #7
It's because German Aristocrats were responsible for giving surnames to Jews. Some Jews ended up with some silly sounding ones because of that. Neubauer was probably assigned to a Jew by a King or Prince a couple hundred years ago. It doesn't mean that Jews farmed, it was just a random surname someone picked out of the wishing well.
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,714
8 Jan 2010  #8
I also know a guy in college who has the last name Neugebauer and he's Jewish.

Probably a mix...married into non-jewish new farmers (some centuries back)! ;)
Not all "-steins" for example are purely jewish nowadays either...

It doesn't mean that Jews farmed.

No it wasn't!
As during the middle ages second names were needed to differentiate between the people, professions, characteristics or origins and locations were used...not randomly assigned.

About the origin of jewish names:
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
8 Jan 2010  #9
second names were needed to differentiate between the people

That was for Germans, but Jews were different. Some of them ended up with names like Greenbaum or something Finkel (I forget the first part) because a German gave them a random surname. I read about it online. I was wondering why some Jews had strange sounding German surnames that didn't sound like they had much to do with Judaism, names like Goldberg, so I did some research.
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,714
8 Jan 2010  #10
Read the link above...it's quite interesting...
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
8 Jan 2010  #11
The fact is that in most traditional tight-knit communities where everyone knew everyone else and everything about him an outsider moving in was viewed with both curiosity and suspicion. Naturally, after a few generations the initial odium subsided, and Nowak, Novak, Neumann or Newman became simply a surname with no special connotation.

As for Jewish names, most any German or Slavonic name coudl have been used by Jews, but certain ones were their favourites.
See also: ancestry.com/facts/Neubauer-name-meaning.ashx

Neugebauer: German and Jewish (Ashkenazic) variant of Neubauer.
German: epithet for a settler who was new to an area, from Middle High German niu(we) 'new' + (ge)bure 'settler', 'resident', 'peasant' (see Bauer).

Jewish: either an adoption of the German surname (Jews were not usually agricultural workers at the time when surnames were acquired) or an artificial creation of a name from the German vocabulary word without any relationship to the actual occupation of the first Jewish bearer.
moshe Zwi
22 Sep 2015  #12
Hi and Shalom to all

My name is Moshe Zwi Neu I was born ( and live) in Israel. My Fatherly Grand father was Moshe Zwi NEUGEBAUER. The family lived in

ULANOW Galizia they were Chassidim. No one of my father's family survived. I know that " Neugebauer" was common between Jews in Austria

Galizia by that time was part of Austro-Hungry Monarchy. Im desperatly looking for any person who is related to the extended Neugebauer family.
So far me and my brother Zeev ( usa) are the only survivers of my father's family. Please contact me also by<moshn2002@yahoo> Thanks
Moshe Zwi
23 Oct 2016  #13
Merged: Family Neusen or Neisen or Neizen from Ulanow Galizia Poland

I am searching for people around the world to whom the following family name sounds somehow familiar;
The name in Gernan "letters" will be Neusen or Neussen. But it is possible that in Polish letters it will be
Neizen or Neisen. The family lived in ULANOW Galizia, Until WW 1 it was part of the Austrian Empire and
later part of Poland. Therefore the names were spelled once in German spelling and than in polish spelling.
Any information will be highly appreciated THANKS
<moshn2002@yahoo>
Kataryna - | 36
19 Jan 2017  #14
@moshe Zwi
Have you thought of doing your DNA through ancestry.com or familytreedna.com and then uploading your DNA to GedMatch? Once you do that you can cross reference to everyone in the GEdmatch system who has similiar DNA by generations.

Merged:

Looking for Nestor, Zurawel, Worobec, Atamanczuk in Galicia Poland



Looking for family with these names. I've done DNA and can match via GedMatch ID.
Ruthenian/Rusyn/Lemko's. Nestor was from Banycja Village in the Golice District.
Rachelbrower
25 Jan 2019  #15
@moshe .Zwi
It won't let me email you. 99% sure That is my family!! Can't believe I found this. There could be a connection here
Email me: rachelnicolebrower@gmail


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