The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 1,541

Polish was chosen the HARDEST LANGUAGE in the world to learn... :D


Lyzko
16 Jul 2010 #841
-:))) Right, apples. Tell us then LOL

)))))

No, czekamy pan!! Nie mamy dużej cierpliwości-:))))

Język polski nie ma rodzajów jak po angielsku "the", "a"/"an", prawda? Dlatego 'in THE office' nie znaczy samo tak 'in office', bez "the".

PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!!
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
16 Jul 2010 #842
Lyzko wrote:

Język polski nie ma rodzajów jak po angielsku

wouldn't this sound better with a "tyle/ile" construction?

Jezyk polski nie ma tyle rodzajow ile angielski.......czy cos takiego? I don't know if you're polish or not Lyzko and whether I'm questioning a polish person's grammar or not.....but i figured I'd ask. the sentence looked mighty strange at first glance.

and yeah, the article used "czworga". i pulled it right out of an article on onet.pl today.
Lyzko
16 Jul 2010 #843
Boże mój! Ale oczywiście, "tylko...tyle....." Ile papiera? - Tyle....... dziękuję!!-:))

Nie, nie jestem rodakiem.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,212
17 Jul 2010 #844
Lyzko

Actually, you were almost correct in your orignal version. The setence should be:
Język polski nie ma [takich/tego typu] rodzajników jak język angielski, to jest rodzajników "the", "a/an". You can't say "tyle" here as Polish has no articles at all.

rodzaj - gender
rodzajnik - article
Lyzko
17 Jul 2010 #845
-:)))! Ćwiczenie tworzy mistrza.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jul 2010 #846
Praktika bardziej :)
Lyzko
17 Jul 2010 #847
Tak jest, Seanuśiu lol
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jul 2010 #848
:) :) Practice makes perfect :)
Lyzko
17 Jul 2010 #849
Zupełno zgadzam się! A to wyrazenie po polsku??
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jul 2010 #850
'Zgadzam się na sto procent' is common :)
Lyzko
17 Jul 2010 #851
dzięki, Seanus-:))!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Jul 2010 #852
You're welcome, ma man :) No, it's not a gay phrase, just sth we say to sb we respect in Scotland.

Nie jestem gejem, ale jeśli chodzi o tej sprawie, nie jestem defensywną osobę
Lyzko
17 Jul 2010 #853
he-he!!
)))
Ziemowit 13 | 4,212
18 Jul 2010 #854
Nie jestem gejem, ale jeśli chodzi o tej sprawie, nie jestem defensywną osobę

I don't quite get the sense of this phrase ("nie jestem defensywną osobą").

The saying "ćwiczenie czyni mistrza" has been known here in Poland in German as well: "Uebung macht den Meister". I believe it came into Polish from German.

Tak jest, Seanuśiu lol

Attention to the "śi" combination of letters. Such one is impossible, as the "i" itself does the job of softening the "s" before a vowel. "Seanuśku", on the other hand, would be perfect.
Lyzko
18 Jul 2010 #855
Dziękuję Ziemowicie!!
Proud Pole
7 Aug 2010 #856
Agrees that we, Poles, hinder our lives, because we must be prepared for hard times that always owe "faithful" allies. And forgive me for mistakes, but I use google translation, because the poorly know English
Lyzko
7 Aug 2010 #857
??? Niestety nie zrozumiem Cię. Co chciesz wyrazić? Proszę pisz po polsku!
Co to jest n.pr. "...that always owe faithful allies.." itd.??? Co to znaczy?
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
7 Aug 2010 #858
Co to znaczy?

Jedyną lekcją, jaką nas nauczyła historia do tej pory to to, że zasługą naszych przyjaciół jest kac, którego się ciężko pozbyć. LOL
Lyzko
7 Aug 2010 #859
Dziękuję, ShortHairedThug-:))

Teraz zrozumiem jego zdanie. Ale nas nauczyła historia wiele lekcje, wśród nich, że Polacy są dumnymi ludami, którzy mają trudny język jak broń przeciwko dużym nieprzyjacielom.

JESZCZE POLSKI NIE ZGINĄ£!!!
robin1980 - | 2
21 Sep 2010 #860
I have been learning polish, on and off, for year. I find it challenging but that is the best part about it, as it gives you a sense of achievement when something clicks into place. The only thing i find bizarre is the future tense eg Why is będę prosił/prosiła used, when będę prosić is also correct and simplier to use.

On a different note, my fianćee got all the questions, posted before like "with four children", right without a seconds hesitation. At least i know i will have a good teacher, once i get past the grammar rules.
Zed - | 195
21 Sep 2010 #861
LOL.... Robin1980... you're in for a surprise :-). More typical is to say "Poproszę" - also a future tense. Go figure.... ! :-) Sometimes I am surprised I at all manage to speak this vernacular language of mine. Never thought it sounds so difficult, but it indeed is, based on how y'all react to it!. Just in my case it comes natural..... Thank you Mom and Dad! :-)
robin1980 - | 2
21 Sep 2010 #862
The use of the imperfective and perfective fell into place, on the plane back from rzeszów, last week :-) The example above, was the first verb that came into my head, it was probably because its on the back page of my verb book. I am sure there will be alot of things that i will find very difficult in the future but i will keep at it. I hate going to see my fiancee's family and not being able to converse with them.
Nojas 4 | 110
5 Oct 2010 #863
I'm little more than one month in my polish studies at University, and it is hard. Special when you have to work so hard to get the right pronounciations and all the sounds (there's nothing funny at all with "szcz" ;-)), as well as getting started with the total nightmare, the grammar.

The use of only 3 tempus (my native language consists of 7 I think) was compensated with the seven casus (two for swedish and english). And once you have learned all the endings depending on genus, base, plural, singular and casus... You still have to learn when to use what.

You know a language will be hard when just saying "hello" takes a lot of practice. I'm in way over my head. ;-)
Lyzko
6 Oct 2010 #864
My native language consists of 7, I think....

Really? nutiden
den forflutna tiden
framtiden
konjunktivet (not really a tense, but a voice!)

I only counted four, actually three-and-a half, then again, Swedish isn't exactly my native language (though I know it light years better than I do Polish LOL).

Swedish is most assuredly an easier language, hands down, than the latter. It of course always depends from which language group one is learning a given foreign language. I for instance, am a German speaker, therefore Swedish was a snap. Polish??? A nightmare as well, at least in the beginning-:))) Russian made a lot more sense, AFTER I had already mastered the basics of Polish.

Most intrigued to hear more of your feedback, Nojas.
Nojas 4 | 110
7 Oct 2010 #865
Really? nutiden
den forflutna tiden
framtiden
konjunktivet (not really a tense, but a voice!)

I checked it up and it's acctually 8:

Present tense
Preterite/Simple past
Perfect
Pluperfect
Future tense
Conditional mood
Conditional mood #2
Futurum preteriti

But as with a lot of things in my language, I believe most of them aren't really used.

And yes for a german or an englishman swedish wouldn't be too hard to learn. Special to the english language there are a lot of similarities on how we build sentences:

- I have a car.
- Jag har en bil.

- I can speak english
- Jag kan tala engelska

Swedish is more a spoken than a written language. The hard thing with swedish is speaking it correctly. A lot of words in german are close to swedish, that's why I can pick up some german without ever having studied it. The grammar I hear.... Not even close. ;-)

But polish is built up very differently, which of course makes it hard for us, but probably easier for people with native tounge in other slavic languages.

But if I can learn polish, I can pretty much take on any language, I feel.
Lyzko
8 Oct 2010 #866
I completely agree, Nojas. Your idiomatic English is really quite good for a non-native speaker! I presume as with my Swedish that you must practice your foreign language skills a lot-:))

Till exempel jag kan tala, lasa och skriva svenska nastan saa flyttande som tyska eller engelska. Polska?? Och, naah du! Men tacka vet jag forr i varlden! Min forsta gaang i Polen kunne de flesta manniskorna tala jatte bra tyska och det var enkelt for mig.

I, for instance, am able to speak, read and write Swedish almost as fluently as German or English. Polish on the other hand?? No way! If only things in the world remained as they once were! My first time in Poland, most people spoke excellent German and that made matters easy for me-:)

How do you find the different verbal aspects in Polish? I still have to think when I write or even speak in Polish, whereas in Swedish I no longer do. LOL
David_18 68 | 982
8 Oct 2010 #867
Im really glad that Poland don't got a so uncultured language like swedish!

You know language says aloot about a country. I guess the sweds never really needed to talk or express themselfs that much in those cold woods in the 14-18th centuries.
Lyzko
8 Oct 2010 #868
"I'm really glad that Poland HASN'T GOT (or: DOESN'T HAVE!!) SUCH AN uncultured language AS Swedish."

David,

I simply had to correct some of your English-:)) On what are you basing this assertion? On the sound of Swedish? In fact, many feel (myself included) that Swedish, along with Estonian and Italian, is one of the most euphonious languages in the world.

I also prefer the sound of Polish to Russian, but will admit that traditional Russian folks songs ("oczy czarnja" etc..) can be heartbreakingly beautiful. The again, Swedish is known for its melancholia too. Many great singers were Swedes: Jenny Lind, Jussi Bjorling, Nicolai Gedda (half-Russian from Stockholm!), Birgit Nilsson, the greatest modern Wagnerian soprano....
David_18 68 | 982
8 Oct 2010 #869
"I'm really glad that Poland HASN'T GOT (or: DOESN'T HAVE!!) SUCH AN uncultured language AS Swedish."

David,

Couldnt care less about my grammar...

I simply had to correct some of your English-:)) On what are you basing this assertion? On the sound of Swedish? In fact, many feel (myself included) that Swedish, along with Estonian and Italian, is one of the most euphonious languages in the world.

Because of its simplicity. Those "many" are mostly the sweds themselfs i guess ;)
Lyzko
8 Oct 2010 #870
I can see you couldn't care less about your grammar. Join the rest of your lazy
countrymen-:))!! Post in Russian then, if you must. At least it'll be authentic. LOL

If you happen to research the subject, you'll find that Swedish is considered one of the most beautiful tongues. Allright, beauty is subjective, true. However, if the standards of beauty are euphony, vocalic harmony and fluidity, sorry, but Swedish wins hands down.

Among the Slavic languages, Czech and Polish seem to do it for me.

Just curious, Nojas. What did you find most difficult about learning Polish, compared with, say, German?


Home / Language / Polish was chosen the HARDEST LANGUAGE in the world to learn... :D
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.