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Polish Easter Tradition is also pagan!


OP pagan 2 | 26
23 Apr 2014 #31
In Christianity the Holy week is a moveable feast.

Yes, but isn't is a pagan tradition that was taken on by the Christians?

Attendance markedly down at the churches attended by people I know in Krzyki.

Maybe so, but there are more and more camping trips organised by the church for young people, students and people in general and the turn out is sometimes so great that there are not enough places to stay. Some of those people are not exclusively Catholic or even Christian but may be agnostic or neo pagan for instance. Some young people leave church to find something else and then come back, the pagan circles do not prohibit the worship of other religions and that helps.
smurf 39 | 1,981
23 Apr 2014 #32
Judaism as an important marker over paganism.

Indeed, and there's quite the handful of denominations in Judaism too.
Judaism by its very nature is older than Christianity, but it's not a particularly old religion, it can also be shown that Judaism borrowed from earlier traditions/cultures.

The point remains though that religions copy and paste what they like from older religions to suit their needs.

Can Fuzzy's question be answered though?

i guess the right question to ask now is.....what traditions are exclusively "Christian"?

I cannot think of any that haven't been pilfered from somewhere else.
OP pagan 2 | 26
23 Apr 2014 #33
Exclusively Christian would be the fact that all people gather in one building (the church) or near the building to have the food blessed. During Slavic pagan times, the families themselves (usually the oldest persons in a family) blessed their food or later during early Christian times the priest would visit one's home and did the blessing. Also, I do not think the eggs were blessed by pagans, they were exchanged between people and usually buried in the fields but there is nothing about eggs being blessed as it is the case in Christianity. So the blessing of the eggs could be exclusively Christian tradition.
smurf 39 | 1,981
23 Apr 2014 #34
Exclusively Christian would be the fact that all people gather in one building (the church) or near the building to have the food blessed.

I think this is also practiced in some sects of Judaism, I could be wrong though.
Muslims also bless food: 'Bhiksha is a devotional offering, usually food, presented at a temple or to a swami or a religious Brahmin who...' although, since Islam is a descendent of Judaism/Christianity that's obviously where it came from.

Also druids used to bless food at public gatherings during Celtic times.
I disagree with you about eggs, eggs were a powerful symbol of fertility, they would most certainly have been 'blessed' by druids during Eostre/Ostara, or they were at least used by druids during the festivities and were used to put spells on women who wished to become pregneant.

The painting of eggs seems to have been happening long before records were even written down.
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
23 Apr 2014 #35
"Pisanki" appear to be common to Polish as well as Russian and Ukrainian Easter tradition:-)
smurf 39 | 1,981
23 Apr 2014 #36
Pisanki

They go back much further than that.

There have been 60,000 year old decorated eggs that have been discovered in Africa, and as early as 3000 B.C., red dyed Persian eggs were given as gifts to honor the first day of spring. Christianity at some point adopted the practice of dying eggs red, retelling the story of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection. The red dye was to represent Christ's blood shed on the cross, and the egg, cracked open-or "hatched," on Easter Sunday was meant to symbolize Jesus emerging from the tomb, having been given new life.

FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
23 Apr 2014 #37
So the blessing of the eggs could be exclusively Christian tradition.

i don't think you can count a tradition as being "christian" if the symbol itself, that being the eggs, is not exclusively christian. neither is blessing food, so blessing eggs cannot possibly be a "christian" tradition in and of itself. i'm not a historian nor do i have the bible memorized cover to cover, but i'm pretty sure there's no mentioning of colored eggs anywhere in there. and let's be honest, the majority of what christians do on christian holidays is not mentioned anywhere in the bible.
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
23 Apr 2014 #38
A surprising number of European countries term "Passover" as something resembling "The Jewish Easter", side by side, so it seems with a vague reference to "Pascal ____", f. ex. Italian "La Pasqua Ebraica" (some nowadays call it simply "Pesach", just as in the Jewish tradition, from Hebrew, yet also Yiddish!), French "La Paque Juife" etc.. German has "Das Passahfest" and Polish even "Święto Pesach", though that association with "saintliness" in the latter is never far from the surfaceLOL
Meathead 5 | 470
24 Apr 2014 #39
Criticizing the Catholic Church's pagan traditions has no reflection of my belief in God. You should read the Gospel and pay particular attention to Matthew and where you read pharisee, cross out and write in Roman Catholic Priest. Thus the Gospel will become very clear to you.
Ladna - | 6
24 Apr 2014 #40
Also druids used to bless food at public gatherings during Celtic times.

I thought so too about the eggs but looks like they didn't bless them just exchanged them or used for spells.
smurf 39 | 1,981
24 Apr 2014 #41
but looks like they didn't bless them just exchanged them or used for spells.

Blessing/exchanging/using in spells, all pretty similar to be fair :)
Peter59 4 | 35
25 Apr 2014 #42
I did not know that, so how does it work?

Easter is always the first Sunday, following the first Full moon, following the Spring equinox. So it actually fluctuates around a thirty day moon phase. This year Easter was almost as late as it can get. It can only move three days later. At the risk of going off topic there is an old saying here in the U.S. "Late Easter , Late Spring", meaning when Easter falls late on the calendar warm Spring weather will also be slow arriving. It seems to have held very true this year, we had frost again this morning and only 32 degrees.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
29 Apr 2014 #43
Peter59 wrote:

"It seems to have held very true this year, we had frost again this morning and only 32 degrees."

I guess that all depends where u live in the US.
pawian 176 | 15,329
4 Apr 2021 #44
Dear guys, I am leaving for the Easter breakfast table now, so let me offer to all of you, both the "completely tolerant", less tolerant and normally tolerant members, these egg pieces as a symbol of peace and reconciliation.

Stay healthy and fine
during this Easter time. Ha!



amiga500 3 | 618
4 Apr 2021 #45
Happy Easter to you and all PF members!
Crow 147 | 9,317
4 Apr 2021 #46
Happy Easter to all who celebrate!
pawian 176 | 15,329
23 Apr 2021 #47
the time of spring arrival the eggs were exchanged between people as a sign of good fortune

Not only people, also people and animals:





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