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Silesian, old Polish heritage?


Wladyslaw4327378
14 Apr 2021 #1
Are those upper Silesian who were allowed to stay in Silesia after the war, who are speaking "Polish - Silesian language" of old Polish heritage or is the connection to the Polish rather similar to the connections of the Czechs to the Polish in terms of origin (genes) and language? I learned Polish and I also know German perfectly and I understand pretty much 90 % of Silesian however i have a much harder time understanding Czech, that why I am wondering why some Silesians claim to be totally different than Poles in terms of heritage and language. My mother Silesian herself claims that the Poles just behind the old Polish border speak just like the Silesians. So this whole " we are total different " seems to be rather a question of different history and feelings rather than actual massive differences regarding to their origin.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,453
15 Apr 2021 #2
"we are total different " seems to be rather a question of different history and feelings rather than actual massive differences regarding to their origin.

You are right. Besides, there are many dialects in Silesia rather than a standarized version of the so-called Silesian language.

No wonder they feel different as they had lived outside Poland's borders for about 700 years. There was a remarkable number of Polsh economic migrants to Upper Silesia in the 19th century which strenghtened the Polish-speaking population there. These people adopted Silesian dialect later on rather than vice versa.

For a Pole like myself it is quite easy to understand Silesian dialect since I know a bit of German. But quite often, they use old Polish/Slavic words that no longer exist in Polish and would be strange to a Pole.

On TV there is a show on Silesian cuisine in which the cook speaks a softened version of Silesian. The way he speaks sounds really funny. For example he says: A teraz przirichtuja ten dressing, which is in fact a mixture of Polish and German and English (teraz - now; przirichtuja - ich mache richtig / I will make ready; ten - this; dressing - dressing)
pawian 179 | 16,124
17 Apr 2021 #3
I am wondering why some Silesians claim to be totally different than Poles in terms of heritage and language

Some radical Silesians want to gain autonomy, just like Scots already have in the UK, or Basques in Spain are fighting for. Those radicals claim that Poland has sucked Silesia of its riches and if they were autonomous, they would prosper much better than now.



Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,183
17 Apr 2021 #4
Silesia has a colorful and distinctive heritage....multi ethnical and rich...but I doubt any independence will re-gain what two wars and decades isolated behind the Iron Curtain destroyed.

There is a vision of building something new again, because the East German border region didn't fare much better. But with now nearly open borders, together in the EU, and many Poles settling there already maybe in time....who knows!

(My grand-family stemmed from in and around Breslau)
pawian 179 | 16,124
17 Apr 2021 #5
around Breslau)

Yes, Breslau is also Silesia, though Lower. While the autonomy is the issue in Upper Silesia.

I doubt any independence will re-gain what two wars and decades isolated behind the Iron Curtain destroyed.

Actually, I don`t mind what the WW2 destroyed in Lower Silesia - did you know that the support for Nazis in national election before the war was the highest in Breslau and Gdańsk regions?? :):)
Miloslaw 11 | 3,197
17 Apr 2021 #6
Breslau

Wroclaw..... ;-)
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,183
17 Apr 2021 #7
Ja genau! :)

But for a german tongue its easier and not to forget, its a nod to our shared history because back then as my family lived there it was Breslau.
Miloslaw 11 | 3,197
17 Apr 2021 #8
Ja genau! :)

LOL!!

back then as my family lived there it was Breslau

Yeah, I know, and like many of the greatest Polish cities, has fine German architecture too.
I have seen this in France too, in Alsace,(Elsass?) Which was also a disputed region.
Strasbourg, Colmar and the whole region looks very pretty and very German.
Miloslaw 11 | 3,197
17 Apr 2021 #10
Yeah, Europe has always had mixed cultures, either by invasion, royal marriage or agreements.
And to be fair, in rhe main, I think it has, in the end, benefited all of us.
Ironside 50 | 11,499
18 Apr 2021 #12
who are speaking "Polish - Silesian language" of old Polish heritage

That!
Beside that a part of what is called today the upper Silesia had been a part of Poland even before the war.
Wladyslaw3462738
20 Apr 2021 #13
My family has been silesian for centuries at least the branches that i know of lived all in the same region not more apart than 20km.

The DNA test of my brother had though the most percentage located in Masowien , then Podkarpacie, then lesser poland and then silesia.
However it gave him information about relatives living right in the area of where all the ancestors came from in silesia...
I just wonder on what kind of information they give you the locations and województwo

it is for sure a disputed area. Most of us went to polish church. Nowadays they go to german church ironically.
But those are of course different generations that were influenced in a different way. I bet silesian 200 years ago didnt feel anything, neither german nor polish, nor did they have united feeling as silesians.

And some poorly educated members of my family in upper silesia did not even speak german or only very poorly not long ago before the war

A lot of times they have never really used german if they were in their village all their lives communicating only in silesian. From what i know there lived also many "real germans" or at least germans who did not know silesian but they had to leave silesia after the war for the most part.

My great grandma has never complained about poles and she learned real polish just by knowing silesian. She has never really studied otherwise the polish language.

However the generation after that, usually feels silesian/germans in a certain regions and in the east they rather only feel silesian, even the sons and grandchildren of people in the old uprisings and usually people do not have the best memories because of the communizm, but sometimes they also have mixed feelings and get a certain feeling of nostalgia , because they were young, so they certainly do not dislike everything.

That's what I kind of heard of silesians.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,183
21 Apr 2021 #14
Nowadays they go to german church ironically.

Do you know what german church? A church where german is spoken or rather a protestant or lutheran church or something?
Jaketheswede
21 Apr 2021 #15
Silesia is as ugly as the Ruhr area in Germany. Nothing on par with Krakow there. Heck, even Eisenach and Berlin wipe the floor with the idustrial drabness of Western Poland. The good parts of Poland are Krakow and Przemysl. Everything else is either too modernist, bare brick or industrial... too much like the Rurh area, Glasgow, Leeds, Charleroi, Lelystad etc.
Bratwurst Boy 12 | 11,183
21 Apr 2021 #16
....don't forget that alot of the old glamour was destroyed during the war and the later socialist vision what a worker - and farmer architecture should look like.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,453
21 Apr 2021 #17
destroyed during the war

Actually, there was quite a number of Lower and Upper Silesian towns which survived the war unscathed.

all thanks to the HRE!

Do you know what Goethe said on hearing the news of the HRE dissolution?


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