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Meaning of surname Wlodarski



maryleeb 1 | -    
14 Aug 2011  #1

Does anyone know the meaning behind the surname Wlodarski?


tygrys 2 | 294    
14 Aug 2011  #2

Could come from the name Włodek (Włodzimierz)
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #3

it means "steward"

is this your last name?

I just saw your other postings- I am sending you a private message. (it is the upper left side "mail")
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #4

pip - by what means is Włodarski supposed to mean 'steward' - where did you get that from?

as for most of the -ski names this one is a place derived surname - there are places in Poland that bear names like Włodary which most probably gave rise to the surname -
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #5

This name is not from a place. I know this name quite well. I have researched it before.
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #6

how come - -ski ending is a basic way to denote some connexion with a place (area) in Polish (and most Slavic languages) - Toruń - toruński, Warszawa - warszawski, Węgry - węgierski,

and your explanation that Włodarski means 'steward' is completely incomprehensible to me

the overwhelming majority of Polish surnames ending in -ski are place derived surnames (as is mine for example) - many such places are not in Poland anymore (say they are now Ukraine) - why should specifically Włodarski be different
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #7

Wlodarski

habitational name for someone from Wlodary in Opole voivodeship, named with Polish wlodarz 'steward'.
occupational name for a steward, from Polish wlodarz (see Wlodarczyk), with the addition of the (originally local) suffix of surnames -ski.
Dictionary of America

surnames.meaning-of-names.com/genealogy/wlodarski/

not all surnames ending in ski are in reference to the town they are from. they are also in reference to the profession- something like Kowalski.
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #8

pip

habitational name for someone from Wlodary in Opole voivodeship, named with Polish wlodarz ‘steward’.

can't be true because in the times Polish surnames started to be created Włodary were no part of Poland and probably Polish was not even spoken there - I know this for sure because I live nearby

there must have been other Włodarys in the Commonwealth of Both Nations - probably in Ukraine now or the place gone missing since

not all surnames ending in ski are in reference to the town they are from. they are also in reference to the profession- something like Kowalski.

there are plenty of place names in Poland and lands that were ruled previously by Poland which bear names like Kowale, Kowal which could have given rise to the Kowalski surname - and they did it surely - I don't say some Kowalski surnames were not created from the profession of individuals yet this is against a rule - Kowal simly would be the surname derived from one's smith's profession
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #9

In all likelihood we will probably never find its exact meaning- it could be from a town and also a profession. However, the surname Wlodarski is not common in Poland- there is not a huge concentration of Wlodarski's living in one area- they seem to be spread out. I have researched this name before- there are a few spread out in the U.S, a few in Canada - I do know the Wlodarski's in Canada are all related to one another. It looks as thought there are also a good number in the U.K.- but this I don't know for sure.

I will take your advice into consideration.
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #10

In all likelihood we will probably never find its exact meaning

the meaning is pretty clear - and I don't think steward is a good translation of Polish włodarz
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #11

Steward is the exact translation of wlodarz. why is it not suitable?
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #12

włodarz has a range of meanings as does steward - there is no one exact translation in either way

actually włodarz means rather owner or ruler than steward - but it could have been different in the times past
pip 11 | 1,662    
14 Aug 2011  #13

włodarz has a range of meanings as does steward - there is no one exact translation in either way

ok- so by your own words above- the last name Wlodarski could either be from a town or a profession? nobody knows for certain.

in all likelihood it come from a town because it makes more sense, according to you. What about Kucharski or Krawiecki or Kamienski- Kamienski could mean a person who works with rocks or a rocky place- two meanings- which makes more sense to you?

Kucharski or Krawiecki? clearly these are professions.

I am not trying to be argumentative with you but I am familiar with this name- I have researched it before -I have come up with Steward- based on the location of those with the last name Wlodarski- but it is totally possible that this name was taken from "steward" and from the town at the same time- in different parts of the country.
gumishu 11 | 4,743    
14 Aug 2011  #14

What about Kucharski or Krawiecki or Kamienski- Kamienski could mean a person who works with rocks or a rocky place- two meanings- which makes more sense to you?

for some reason (historical mainly) there are lots of place names in Poland that are connected with professions - Kuchary (cooks), Kowale (smiths), Krawce (tailors), Szewce (shoemakers) Grotniki (fletchers), Szczytniki (shield makers), Koniuchy (horse breeders), Skotniki (cattle butchers or breeders), Rybaki (fishers),, Toporniki (axe makers), Owczary (sheep breeders) and many many others

that you get Kucharscy, Kowalscy, Skotniccy of these local place names is no mystery nor wonder - most of such place-name-derived personal names are to be attributed to the noble classes (but definitely not all - some people where named after the place they came from not being of nobility in the slightest)

if a surname is profession derived it reads simply as Kucharz, Kowal, Krawiec, Szewc, Szewczyk (Szewczyk is a son of a szewc/shoemaker), Młynarz, Rybak, Woźnica)

btw those surnames which are connected with actual Polish towns or cities are mostly not exactly very Polish - Dawid Warszawski is of Jewish descent - it is a direct translation of a typical Jewish surname that grew from a place name like Lubliner, Lomzer

those places in Polish surnames tend to be small - you wouldn't have Lwowski nor Warszawski surname of Polish nobility

I am not trying to be argumentative with you but I am familiar with this name- I have researched it before -I have come up with Steward- based on the location of those with the last name Wlodarski- but it is totally possible that this name was taken from "steward" and from the town at the same time- in different parts of the country.

yes, both can be true
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,579    
14 Aug 2011  #15

A włodarz can be a ruler, head man, person in authority including an estate steward or manager. Włodarski could be either patronymic (the son of włodarz) or toponymic from Włodary.

No coat of arms goes with Włodarski. There is one for Włodawski called Murdelio.

The only one I could find online is this: polish-gifts.com/murdelio-coat-of-arms.html

A more authoritative armorial (hard-copy) version shows the shield to be red and has a white griffin in the crest above the crowned helmet.
KJW    
8 Mar 2013  #16

I agree with pip when I asked my father what our name meant in polish he said it meant "Stewart" .
He was born in 1917 in Chicagoland but his father was named Joseph born in Poland in 1887.
Funny that for such a oddly small family there was another Wodarski family in Chicagoland that is no relation.
pip 11 | 1,662    
8 Mar 2013  #17

Where was he born in Poland??
Kenwood88    
8 Jan 2015  #18

I'm not sure where he was born, those records were lost. I did try to research his Ellis island records but to my surprise there are a lot of Joseph wlodarski's that took that name on the ship over. Most of them were from Austria-Hungry, I'm pretty sure we came from, what is now that part of southern Poland.
Polonius3 1,019 | 12,579    
9 Jan 2015  #19

W£ODARSKI: probably originated as a patronymic nck whose root-word was włodarz (an old term for a chief, headman or leader); Włodarski would therefore be the leader's son.
ewlodarski    
15 May 2016  #20

my father too was born 1917 in poland but lived in chicago.
Rlm13 - | 1    
24 Jun 2016  #21

Merged: Baranski / Wlodarski - Meaning and origen of my surname

Baranski / Wlodarski - Meaning and origen of my surname

Anyone knows the origen and/or meaning of these surnames?

Baranski
Wlodarski (could be woldarski)

I've found anything about them and people in my family don't talk much about it. However my great grandmother used to say the run away from poland and moved here (brazil) when she was little, that would have been around the end of the XIX century.

Thanks to anyone who answers, I'm very curious about my heritage.

And sorry about any gramatical mistakes, english isn't my first language.
kpc21 1 | 763    
25 Jun 2016  #22

They are quite popular. Maybe not ones of the most popular in Poland, but usually you know someone who has a such or similar surname.



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