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Americans of Polish descent. How many of us are on Polish forums?


OP Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
18 Jul 2012 #151
Most of the traditons we still celebrate have to do with Christmas, and food.

lucky you :)

I guess I do the same, its just not the same foods

also got to meet my relatives in person then

excellent :)

Someday I am going to meet my Polish Brother and his family * he knows who he is*

Its nice to hear that your family still carrys on the same traditions. I can tell its fading here, festivals are not the same
like when I was a kid, the change is evident. I think the older generations made the difference.

actually I know they did.
texas 1 | 21
12 Jul 2013 #152
I think at some stage identity it a matter of personal choice, which brings us nicely back to the Americans.

I don't know... I think there are certain things you can't erase from your personality, psyche, and memory. I wasn't born in Poland, and I've never lived there, although I've traveled there VERY frequently. I lived in many countries, but spent most of my time in the U.S. Being Polish was, is, and will always be a part of my identity, although to be completely honest, there are huge pockets of the Polish culture that I do not relate to in the least. But I am Polish because that is what I am. That is my blood. That is my family. That is my heritage, my ancestors, stories, memories, and legacy of my familial and ethnic heritage, and what my ancestors fought for. I am very proud of my family tree and my heritage and I can't and I wouldn't want to erase that simply because I was born elsewhere and because I grew up in and live in a completely different country. To me, being Polish (or any other ethnicity, for that matter) isn't about pierogi vs. burgers, or cheering for soccer vs. football, or waving around red and white vs. red white and blue. It goes much deeper than that, and because it DOES go so much deeper, this depth allows me to embrace certain characteristics of my other country, without them clashing. I guess I feel both Polish and American, equally, but on different levels.
MediaWatch 10 | 945
24 Aug 2013 #153
This is well said.

As a Polish American, I feel about my Polish and American identity the way you do. They actually go together quite well.
pierogi2000 4 | 229
24 Aug 2013 #154
The older I get, the less connection I feel to the USA. I'm planning on following in the foot steps of my sister and moving back (Lived 20 years in the USA) to Europe. Maybe if the USA wasn't in free fall as a society and culture, this wouldn't be the case. But being white, having no family in the USA & not being wealthy, there is absolutely no reason to live here. I would not only be wasting my European passport but accepting a lesser quality of life.

My outlook changed roughly 8 years ago when I visited Germany for the first time. I realized most of the propaganda and nationalism I was spoon fed in American schools and media, was complete crap. I've seen first hand the improvement in Poland from 1992 to 2013 and I think Central Europe is currently the place to be. It's still relatively cheap, expanding, free but yet not over run by minorities & crime/lack of morals values. The more time I spend in Europe (3 trips in the past 7 years and considering next summer) the less I want to return to the USA. Two years ago I felt a slight bit of excitement when we touched down in Los Angeles but this summer even though I spent 3 months (Home sickness almost always kicks in) I was dreading the return. My excitement and sense of home has steadily declined as I've aged and spent more time overseas. At this point the USA feels like a small cesspool cut off from the rest of the world. It's difficult to connect with Americans that never left North America. They are fixated on the most trivial and simple aspects of life when I've experienced different cultures/lifestyles and challenged myself.

My background is growing up in a Polish spoken, taught Polish values and also moderately Catholicism home. Moved to the USA when I was 5 years old. Lived in "the finest city in America": San Diego.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #155
At this point the USA feels like a small cesspool cut off from the rest of the world.

I often wonder what iis it about that cesspool that makes it so attractive to others (Europeans, Third Worlders) who are tripping over themselves to copy it ASAP.
pierogi2000 4 | 229
24 Aug 2013 #156
Polonius3

I often wonder what iis it about that cesspool that makes it so attractive to others (Europeans, Third Worlders) who are tripping over themselves to copy it ASAP.

American media is extremely influential, especially music, TV shows & movies. While Hollywood has (thankfully) lost some it's credibility and internet has allowed people access to International films, American music continues to be a driving force globally. Turn on European radio, go to a European bar etc, you will eventually hear American music.

Unless you've been to the USA, you aren't aware of the poverty. You can't comprehend how it's a nation built for cars not people. The food is extremely cheap because it's bombarded with products banned in Europe. Multiculturalism has created a society split up with countless groups not sharing any mutual goal but the one for $$$.

Since WW2, Poland has always had an unhealthy fascination with USA. While it's unrealistic to have expected the nation to take the path of Scandinavian nations, going the way of American capitalism has and will continue to have consequences. Walking into a "Hip Hop" club in Wroclaw, I was extremely troubled. I had a short conversation with the bouncer and he agreed with my opinion of wiggers. Foreingers only see the positives of the USA: the wealthy. Hell, many Americans only focus on this part of the nation.

It's understandable why 3rd World countries glamorize the USA. My father did the same in Poland (1980-1988). Overwhelming amount of Europeans that visited my family & I since the mid 1990's, viewed the USA as a great vacation spot but not somewhere they would want to live out their lives.
legend 3 | 664
24 Aug 2013 #157
Well I think it was okay for Poland to have partnership with US to counter communism. Some individuals in countries in the West did help Poland get away.

However, since 2000 you are right. Polands obssession with US is disgusting. Thats why I dislike PiS.
Many Poles (and Westerners) think Putin is USSR Communist v2.0 when its not.

In fact if you look at foreign policy, its Russia who has turned into a more moral country. Countries like US, Britain, France have DISGUSTING foreign policies in comparison.

If you asked me in 1985 I might favor America, but today I easily favor Russia over US.

Russia is more Christian than US (government and many ppl). The roles have reversed.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
24 Aug 2013 #158
Still got a recognisable Scottish brough (spelling)?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
24 Aug 2013 #159
Many Poles (and Westerners) think Putin is USSR Communist v2.0 when its not.

I suspect Poles are far more able to understand Putin and his motives than the average Canadian.
legend 3 | 664
24 Aug 2013 #160
Correct. But as I am ethnically a Pole, affairs of Eastern Europe still interest me and im sure I know enough situation.
Living here in the west I also clearly see the atrocious **** FUKUS (France, UK, US) axis has done.
Under Canadas latest PM Harper has followed the FUKUS as well, so Canada isnt innocent either.

The average Canadian might only be clued in to Canada (because of news), US (cnn,etc) and Britain(BBC,etc).
Kevwad 1 | 17
24 Aug 2013 #161
Since WW2, Poland has always had an unhealthy fascination with USA.

Most people of Polish decent that live now in America actually came before WW1, but don't have any Polish culture anymore.

It's understandable why 3rd World countries glamorize the USA. My father did the same in Poland (1980-1988). Overwhelming amount of Europeans that visited my family & I since the mid 1990's, viewed the USA as a great vacation spot but not somewhere they would want to live out their lives.

My parents would disagree. My dad came to america when the Berlin wall was still up thinking the streets are paved with gold and $20 dollars in his pocket. But he likes america because after years of hard work, he is now making a very good living.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
25 Aug 2013 #162
Indeed, not only Poles have idealised and glamoruised America.Since the 19th century it has been a beacon of hope to the downtrodden and improversihed, a land of opportuntiy where the bootblack could become a millionaire. And it was unravaged by the two greatest wars in human history. In America the averaga worker lived like the Old Country elite.
Bronek7
10 Nov 2013 #163
Many Poles came to USA with different passports, since Poland was not a free country for many years,so I think to numbers of Poles in America is low due to many coming in without Polish identity ///
ProudRoots 1 | 32
11 Nov 2013 #164
I think a good amount are on these forums. I'm Polish-American, Polish on my Mother's side. I live here in America and I know other Polish-Americans and they are proud of their roots. I think the reason a lot of us are on here is Polish-Americans are usually proud of their roots more than German-Americans, Italian-Americans, etc. I don't know why but I find it to be true.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
11 Nov 2013 #165
Which is quite amusing, given the general level of ignorance among Polish-Americans as to Polish history.
ProudRoots 1 | 32
12 Nov 2013 #166
So, you find us annoying? A shame. There are many good Polish-Americans out there. Even if there is little knowledge of their background it doesn't make them Polish any less. Same with Irish-Americans, Italian-Americans etc.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,454
12 Nov 2013 #167
I find it amusing rather than annoying. Most Europeans find it quite hilarious when someone proclaims themselves to be something-American while exhibiting a high level of ignorance.

And yes, it makes them less Polish if they don't even understand that Poland (until 1945) was very much a country of many different nationalities and is still home to a number of ethnic groups.
ProudRoots 1 | 32
12 Nov 2013 #168
Hard to understand that a person's knowledge could take away their ethnicity. And I very well knew of all the different ethnic groups in Poland.

You said it makes them less Polish, which makes no sense.
gjene 14 | 204
5 May 2014 #169
I kind of agree with pieorgi2000. I was over to Germany and Poland twice within the last 4 yrs with hopefully the 3rd trip coming up later this yr. I noticed that the public transportation system is a lot better over there. That makes it a lot easier to get around even in and out of smaller communities. It seems the transport system there is at least 50 years ahead of what we have here in Canada. The train system here is slowly being cut back and even the bus service between a lot of the communities whether small or large is not very conducive. That means you almost have to coerce someone to give you a ride back and forth from one small community to another or a larger centre. Even if I am not fluent with either German or Polish, I felt more at home over there.
Dont gag me yo 7 | 156
5 May 2014 #170
The train system here is slowly being cut back and even the bus service between a lot of the communities whether small or large is not very conducive

Yup,same in the usa,the car trip that takes only 20 minutes by public transportation can take almost 16 hours(as the buses and connecting buses will make you wait for 6/7 hours).I agree usa is a nation for cars,electronics,branded clothes,music etc,but lately the food in the usa is getting compatable by that of europe for eg a loaf of bread in $3.99,other day I bought oranges for $1.25 each..either the food is getting expensive in the usa or the polish prices for food rising
SDerdau - | 2
19 Jan 2016 #171
I just found this forum.
I'm looking into Polish Citizenship by descent, since my father was from Poland.
Actually from what I heard he was an officer in the Polish Military.
However he died when I was 3 years old and I don't know much about him.
I have some paperwork of his like a Naturalization paperwork when he became a US Citizen.
Looking into getting more information like where he was born so that I can see if I can qualify for Poland citizenship.
May also be interested in retiring in Poland and visiting there as well.
Roger5 1 | 1,455
19 Jan 2016 #172
I just found this forum.

Abandon hope all ye who enter here.
Harry
19 Jan 2016 #173
I have some paperwork of his like a Naturalization paperwork when he became a US Citizen.

When did he become a US citizen? That's going to be the key thing. If it was before 1962, he lost his Polish citizenship.

May also be interested in retiring in Poland and visiting there as well.

You don't need citizenship to visit, just come on over (although you might want to wait a few months, it's not too warm right now, come in May). But retiring in Poland without being completely fluent in Polish might well be a bad idea.
johnny reb 38 | 7,723
20 Aug 2017 #174
speak up we dont have to sit back and let people call us names, we dont have to answer to people!!!

We don't have to answer to people (defend ourselves) except to the ex-pats on the Polish Forums you mean ? lol

Most Europeans find it quite hilarious when someone proclaims themselves to be something-American while exhibiting a high level of ignorance.

Case in point, have you ever heard a Yoorapean call themselves a Scottish - Pole ?
johnny reb 38 | 7,723
20 Aug 2017 #175
Let me elaborate.
America is not even 250 years old yet.
The people from around the world who migrated here are very proud of their ancestry so therefore it has become an American tradition to put our ancestry before America to identify.

Polish - American, Afro - American or in Canada's case, French Canadian for example.
Knowing this the Americans often times will call themselves Polish referring to their ancestry and heritage.
We need not Poland's or European's permission to do this no matter how offended they may be.
It is a harmless American tradition like it or not.

have you ever heard a Yoorapean call themselves a Scottish - Pole ?

Of course not as they would just call themselves a European which covers all the old European countries.
Americans of Polish descent. How many of us are on Polish forums?
Finally enough since the Polish Forums originated to hold our own.
Harry
21 Aug 2017 #176
have you ever heard a Yoorapean call themselves a Scottish - Pole ?

You mean like the Scottish man who was mayor of Warsaw four times? You really couldn't have picked a worse pair of nationalities there, the Polish-Scottish links are hundreds of years older than Polish-American ones and much deeper too. Care to name any Polish-Americans who have been mayor of Warsaw? Or any Polish-Americans who have been chief engineer of the Polish navy?
johnny reb 38 | 7,723
21 Aug 2017 #177
Thank you for confirming my point that they were of Scottish decent and not of Polish decent like Pol - Americans are.
Harry
21 Aug 2017 #178
You really are hilarious. Perhaps you'd like to educate yourself a little? scotpoles.co.uk
johnny reb 38 | 7,723
21 Aug 2017 #179
You are even more hilarious.
Gee Harr, thanks for enlightening us that the Scottish people evolved from Poland.
You are claiming that the Scots blood lines came from Poland.
Very interesting to say the least. lol
There are more Pol Americans on this forum with Polish ancestry than Pol Scots (are there any ?) which is the topic old boy.
Again you obsessive compulsion behavior is to argue trolling like I have already said.

We don't have to answer to people (defend ourselves) except to the ex-pats on the Polish Forums you mean ? lol

Business at your bicycle shop must be slow today aye ?

Of course not as they would just call themselves a European which covers all the old European countries.

That was my point Harr so troll & spin it to your hearts delight but please do it in Off - Topic.
Now back on topic here please. (as it goes in one ear and out the other)
time1865
15 Dec 2017 #180
They say there are around 10 million people who claim to be Polish American. After all the American bashing on this website I haven't a clue why we carry on the traditions of our ancestors. It doesn't matter what the topic sooner or later someone will start with your stupid.

Today I was at the Polish butcher that my family has gone to for 56 years shopping for Christmas. An older gentleman that has worked there for years was asked by a friend that was shopping if he went back to the Old Country. He smiled and said no I love it here. He came to the US in the 60's with his family to start a new life. I imagine he is stupid.

A conversation should never degrade to name calling even when you don't agree.

Merry Christmas


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