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Origin of the pierogi


Raypolska 1 | 2
20 Dec 2010  #1
I have always thought that pierogi was a polish food. Recently I looked into it and have found that many people attempt to take credit, including most european nations surrounding poland and of course the chinese want credit too. I think they refer to the tartars, mongolians who invaded poland around the 12th century I believe. Is the pierogi just thought of as a polish food. I have searched somewhat diligently in attempt to find the origin of this great and simple food. If anyone has any information I may have not found I would greatly appreciate.
1jola 14 | 1,879
20 Dec 2010  #2
The Chinese were making "pierogies" when Europeans were still barking at each other.
peterweg 36 | 2,316
20 Dec 2010  #3
You are simply assuming that. Europe had a quite sophisticated culture eight thousand years ago, we just don't know about it because it wasn't written down.
mafketis 20 | 7,171
20 Dec 2010  #4
The idea of raw dough wrapped around a filling of vegetables and/or meat and/or cheese and then cooked can be found just about everywhere where grains with gluten are cultivated.

Pierogies as made and enjoyed in Poland (with the particular dough and fillings and cooking methods can be thought of as Polish.
smurf 39 | 1,982
20 Dec 2010  #5
we just don't know about it because it wasn't written down

so how exactly do you know?
Olaf 6 | 956
20 Dec 2010  #6
Recently I looked into it and have found that many people attempt to take credit, including most european nations surrounding poland and of course the chinese want credit too.

They are all obviously copycats! In almost each of the countries you mentioned the reicepe is a bit different, not to mention Chinese ones are not really pierogi in this sense, they might seem similar though.

The origin of pierogi is simple: God created them on his seventh day of creation. He needed lunch anyway.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
20 Dec 2010  #7
Don't know about anyone else but to me, pierogi is like dumplings but made wrongly - with something missing or not cooked properly or something : )

As Mafketis says, pierogi-like things are found practically everywhere.
smurf 39 | 1,982
20 Dec 2010  #8
God created them on his seventh day of creation

riiiight.
you go here now
bit.ly/SEZXW
Olaf 6 | 956
20 Dec 2010  #9
Smurf, there is nothing about this miracle in your link:))
I wasn't dead serious with my theory in case you didn't notice...
smurf 39 | 1,982
20 Dec 2010  #10
:)
yea man I know
polkamaniac 1 | 482
20 Dec 2010  #11
This is very interesting----"Pierogi are of untraceable origin - in many countries they are claimed to be "original traditional food". They have strong links to Slavic culture, and may also have originated among other European peoples, such as: Poles, Ukrainians, Italians, Romanians, Russians, Lithuanians, Latvians, and Slovaks. In Asia, similar food is served on Chinese tables, where they are characterized as dumplings. Other forms were spotted throughout the Far East, which fuels speculation, well-founded or not, that the Mongols or Persians brought the recipe to the West. "No matter where they came from,pierogy are one of my most favourite foods.





OP Raypolska 1 | 2
20 Dec 2010  #12
Yes lots of things are found everywhere but most of them had some point of origin. I generally would not care too much, but I found it intriguing to know just how many people are so adamant about taking credit. Thats all
polkamaniac 1 | 482
20 Dec 2010  #13
Yes---Lot's of countries take credit for the famous pierogy but---" Tracing the history of the pierogi is tricky because the food did not suddenly materialize in some small town and then remain static over time. Since pierogi are basically dumplings, there is some evidence to suggest that pierogi ancestors, as it were, made their way from “the Orient” across Central Asia where they were more veggie-filled and into Eastern Europe."This could be quite true since the Asians evolved lot earlier than the Europeans did.
beckski 12 | 1,617
20 Dec 2010  #14
of course the chinese want credit too

I must admit, some of the Chinese dumplings come pretty damn close in taste. Especially, when I'm having bad cravings for a tasty meat pierogi.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
5 Feb 2011  #15
Didn't know which thread to put this on, but thought I would mention it. The Superbowl is this weekend and one of the popular "tailgater" foods for one of the teams competing, the Pittsburg Steelers is the Pierogi! Millions will be made and enjoyed all across the US today and tomorrow.
rychlik 41 | 373
6 Feb 2011  #16
Let's get some facts straightened out.

A lot of cultures have a "pierogi" type delicacy. Italians have ravioli, Chinks have dumplings (which come fried by the way and pierogi's are not traditionally fried) and Poles and Ukrainians have the pierogi.

In Canada, where I live, pierogi's have been made popular by Poles and Ukrainians when they were coming here a hundred years ago. Toronto has more Polish delicatessens than the Ukrainians and they are readily available for sale here.

In America, the Poles are the biggest by far eastern European group and are attributed to them almost exclusively.

I did some research a while back and found out that pierogi's can be traced to the Polish/Ukrainian lands.
gosc
6 Feb 2011  #17
(which come fried by the way and pierogi's are not traditionally fried)

The Chinese ones come steamed as well and many Poles fry their pierogi.
Wiedzmin_fan - | 79
6 Feb 2011  #18
The picture is so strange - it looks like dumplings. Do you boil them or fry them? Also, the dough looks strange...

Do you have an equivalent of the russian/ukrainian pirogi - made with the fluffy yeast/sour dough, and baked?
mafketis 20 | 7,171
6 Feb 2011  #19
Pierogi are only fried after being boiled. Usually it's a way to reheat leftovers.

I've never heard of any kind of baked pierogi in Poland.
Eurola 4 | 1,906
7 Feb 2011  #20
Do you have an equivalent of the russian/ukrainian pirogi - made with the fluffy yeast/sour dough, and baked?

The picture shows something that looks more like baked rolls, not pierogi. What was the stuffing made of? Meat, cheese, anything also? My mom used to bake similar looking rolls with cheese.
Wiedzmin_fan - | 79
7 Feb 2011  #21
Eurola

Filling is usually kapusta/cabbage with boiled eggs.
Or mushrooms with fried onions.
Or fish with rice.

The meat ones are usually fried, and they have an opening/hole (not completely closed). and they are called "belyashi" instead of "pirogi" then.

But the key feature is the "fluffy"/rizen dough that's made with yeast. are polish pierogi made with flat dough?
Eurola 4 | 1,906
7 Feb 2011  #22
Yes, flat dough, no yeast. Pierogi are kind of bigger ravioli.

The kapusta/boiled eggs filling is somewhat unusual. I never heard of it. However, the mushrooms with fried onions sound good...Maybe I can talk my friend into improvising this kind of rolls. She bakes something similar with marmalade stuffing, but if she put in ground beef, mushrooms and onions...spices...that could come out pretty tasty.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2011  #23
I've said it before that Poles could broaden their selection of pierogi. I've just finished reading an article on Chinese yaiozi which I ate as gyouza in Japan. The mixed vegetable filling is delicious. Melted cheese pierogi would be fantastic :) The Czechs have their fried cheese and doughy foods (knedliczki) so I don't see why Poles can't throw in some cheese. Bacon pierogi :)
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
12 Jun 2011  #24
Melted cheese pierogi would be fantastic

Have you ever tried "pierogi ruskie" but those made really good?
One of my faves, few people can make them right, surprisingly, good chefs know how to make those.

(Yes, I know you refer to "yellow" cheese... Wouldn't be good in pierogi).

The article linked by PennBoy denies the good taste of ogórkowa. Poor author, got his soup made wrongly. "Meat base"... It spoils zupa ogórkowa totally. Zupa ogórkowa is one of few vegetarian Polish soups. No meat.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
12 Jun 2011  #25
They are stodgy and for winter.

Pierogi are Polish soul-food and are delicious and appropriate thoughout the year

i think Polish food is rather simple and bland. as well as that i find Polish sausage stomach churning.

nothing wrong with simple! The venerable cheeseburger is the epitome of simple but far from bland ;)...as for your sausage critique. find another butcher. Kiełbasa krajana is just perfect thank you very much :) Smacznego!
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2011  #26
Have I tried ruskie, AS? I've lived here for almost 7 years and I'm a fan of pierogi so what do you think? ;) ;)

You are right to point out the variation in different places. There is a bar here which does them very well. 12 of them for 5.50PLN. 2 portions for the average person but 1 for me ;)

If it gets a little cooler then I'll be the first person to enjoy the bargain of the Sierakowidzki bar's pierogis :)
rybnik 18 | 1,462
12 Jun 2011  #27
Where's this???
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2011  #28
In Gliwice :) :) It is a great milk bar with all the standard offerings. I can't help but feel that a lot of the food there is of peasant stock. We have similar stuff in Scotland with regards to side salads and potatoes, stews too.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
12 Jun 2011  #29
Sounds great! I'll be passing through in September on my way to family. I'll have to schedule a pit-stop in Gliwice :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2011  #30
It's next to the ZUS offices, close to the Piotr&Pawel cathedral. You can't miss it :)


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