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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


Wroclaw 44 | 5,389
12 Dec 2011  #241
is it normal for polatsy to boil sausages?

simmer not boil. they will split open otherwise.
pam
12 Dec 2011  #242
yeah you are right. pomylilam sie. just totally alien to see sausages being simmered...:)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,389
12 Dec 2011  #243
just totally alien to see sausages being simmered...:)

think of them as giant hotdogs.
pam
12 Dec 2011  #244
but i wouldnt simmer hotdogs either....
Wroclaw 44 | 5,389
12 Dec 2011  #245
how do you heat them up ?
blackadder 1 | 114
12 Dec 2011  #246
Kaszanka sausages are good in Poland,tried em 3-4 times...not bloody enough.I guess it depends of recipe.I like em' bloody.
That sounded weird I suppose :)
boletus 30 | 1,366
12 Dec 2011  #247
Some Polish and German sausages are sold raw. Typical are "white sausage" varieties: Bavarian "Weisswurst" (veal and pork bacon) and its Polish counterpart "biała kiełbasa" (pork and veal). They are usually flavoured with parsley, lemon, mace, onions, ginger and cardamom, though there are some variations (in Polish cuisine the marjoram is a must).

These sausages are very delicate and frying them would be considered a culinary horror. Grilling is acceptable, but simmering them (short of boiling ) is a king of the method. They are usually served with very mild mustard or horse radish in Poland. The boiled variety are also served with (actually in) "żur, or "żurek" (farmer's soup, rye flour soup, sour flour soup).

You made a big mistake by refusing your locator's offer. They are delicious. Well, here comes a declaimer: not always, I once discarded one of German's "Weisswurst" dishes because I could not stand some unidentified spice, which it was flavoured with.
pam
12 Dec 2011  #248
how do you heat them up ?

apologies because this is not just me, its my lokator as well. we put them in the microwave on low. this sounds terrible because i am a pretty good cook.i only microwave food if i am in a hurry and am busy...:)
Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 441
13 Dec 2011  #249
apologies because this is not just me, its my lokator as well. we put them in the microwave on low.

Go on, blame the Poles then... haha ;)
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
23 Jun 2012  #250
Take a few fresh pig kidneys

Cut them open and cut out the white stuff which smells awful

Keep them in cold water for a few hours. Change water a few times.

Put them in a roasting container, add vegetables, spices, a glass of brandy etc etc

and roast for an hour or two until soft

Serve with whatever you want

Ooops, I looked through the thread and it seems it doesn`t contain my fav dish though I remember posting it somewhere in PF. But where???
p3undone 8 | 1,135
17 Jul 2012  #251
Pawian,what are the eggs topping;is that raw hamburger?
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
17 Jul 2012  #252
Pawian,what are the eggs topping;

They are two egg yolks!

is that raw hamburger?

Kind of.
But Polish style! :):):):)
p3undone 8 | 1,135
17 Jul 2012  #253
I'd have no problem trying that,I've eaten raw moose meat before.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
17 Jul 2012  #254
Raw eggs on raw meat. Not for the faint-hearted. You need to drink vodka with this to kill any bugs. That's the theory anyway. The Turkish version of steak tartare is called Çiğ köfte. They make it with hot spices. Highly recommended, especially with Raki, their Pernod/Oozo type booze.
boletus 30 | 1,366
17 Jul 2012  #255
Pawian,what are the eggs topping;is that raw hamburger?

This is called steak tartar: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak_tartare

Made of ground beef (Poland) or ground horse (Belgium). Absolutely delicious, although it does not look that good at the end of the preparation. The ingredients vary. Pawian have them all: raw eggs, sardines, marinated chanterelles, onions, pickles, leeks, fresh white bread. Salt and pepper too.
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
17 Jul 2012  #256
Ooops, I looked through the thread and it seems it doesn`t contain my fav dish though I remember posting it somewhere in PF. But where???

I remember now!!! The Polish lifestyle month by month thread !!!
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
17 Jul 2012  #257
You need to drink vodka with this to kill any bugs.

And throwing salt over your shoulder protects you from bad luck.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
17 Jul 2012  #258
boletus,I'd eat everything on that plate in a heartbeat.
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
17 Jul 2012  #259
The ingredients vary. Pawian have them all: raw eggs, sardines, marinated chanterelles, onions, pickles, leeks, fresh white bread. Salt and pepper too.

Perfect except for one thing.

Apart from 1 chantarelle mushroom, the rest are a bit nobler: maślaki !!!! Slime mushrooms! My fav. The slimer, the better. :):):):) Collected in Beskid Niski Mountains.

It isn`t purely Polish drink, it is rather Eastern European, probably from Ukraine.

Beet kvas.

hiddenpondllc.com/beet-kvass

What is verified is that beet Kvass and beet juice helps detox from radiation and toxin exposure, is used as a cancer therapy throughout Europe and is frequently recommended to cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy . Beet Kvass is also a good source of whole-spectrum, natural iodine. Beet kvass cleanses the liver, improves digestion with over 20 different beneficial probiotics and b-vitamin rich yeast, helps with allergies, and more and more. This is why the Ukrainians call it a "Cure All".

I can give you links to Polish forums where people praise it and claim that they managed to cure some types of cancer with it.

Yes, there is sth to it as since I started drinking it, I have noticed I don`t fall ill as often as in the past. One, two colds per year - that`s everything.

Western recipes.

However, instead of whey you should add a slice of brown bread to initiate fermentation. Don`t forget to remove the slice after 2 or 3 days to avoid mould. Also add a clove of garlic.

Like here:

celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-burakovyi-kvas

So far I have bought it, many companies make it, but the best, excellently fermented (careful when opening, yesterday I had to wipe the kitchen table dry) is from this company:

patucha-jagiello.pl

Costs about 1.5 PLN per half litre.

But I decided to make my own!!!
p3undone 8 | 1,135
6 Aug 2012  #260
Pawian,I noticed on the first page that you have fish heads there.In Alaska they have a meal they call stink heads.They take raw fish heads and bury them in the ground and let them ferment for about a month;then they dig them up and eat them as is.My brother swears by them,he absolutely loves this meal,I on the other hand wouldn't dare dream of eating them.Would you try them?
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
7 Aug 2012  #261
Of course I would. I even tried to prepare this dish. I buried the heads but when I tried to collect the fermented ones, I found an open hole in the ground and the heads missing. It happened a few times. I still don`t know what happened. Did the dogs dig them for dog food or some naughty kids to play with?
p3undone 8 | 1,135
7 Aug 2012  #262
Pawian,are you serious you've actually tried to do this?Pawian;I wouldn't recommend doing this in Poland unless it's during the very early spring,other wise you could very well kill yourself.They do this in the summer in Alaska,but the ground has permafrost which is a 4 ft thick layer of frozen ground year round.This keeps the fish from fermenting to a lethal dose.Because it is in the summer the air that gets in is just warm enough to begin the fermentation.The Alaska Natives have always eaten it.If you or I tried it,we would more than likely get sick the first time,but not deadly sick and then after that our system could handle it.My brother said he got sick the first time he ate it.Now he loves it.
ciderman - | 5
7 Aug 2012  #263
I think it's mostly a pile of carp - forgive the pun. Things I love though are gołabki and żurek. The rest of it if you go to Polish restaurant is just... horrible. Kind of a shame though, cos my friend gave me a huge book of polish recipes many very interesting (I'm a pro cook), but I have yet to see many if any of them in public space.
OP pawian 157 | 9,053
8 Aug 2012  #264
Pawian,are you serious you've actually tried to do this?

Yes. Why not?

Pawian;I wouldn't recommend doing this in Poland unless it's during the very early spring,other wise you could very well kill yourself.

Wow, I didn`t know about it.

I have always dreamt of eating like Alaskan natives. Do you remember our participation in the thread about Eskimo people? That`s where we met for the first time. :):):):):)

If you or I tried it,we would more than likely get sick the first time,but not deadly sick and then after that our system could handle it.My brother said he got sick the first time he ate it.Now he loves it.

Good. I am sure I would love it too.

There is a bit similar food in Krakow region.

Allow cottage/farmer cheese to rot for a few days, until mould is thick and smelly. Then fry it in the frying pan, adding salt, dill, chive and a lot of cumin. Finally, spread on a slice of toast and consume. Delicious!

/pierogi_2_300x300.jpg - Eating Poland
p3undone 8 | 1,135
8 Aug 2012  #265
Pawian,that actually sounds really good,is sourdough bread common in Poland.I forgot that you participated in that thread :).
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
8 Aug 2012  #266
sourdough bread

is of Mexican, not Polish, origin.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
8 Aug 2012  #267
Des Esseintes,I never said it was of Polish origin,I was curious if it was common there.
jasondmzk
8 Aug 2012  #268
I dig it all, with the exception of barszcz, and oscypek. Some of the Delicje brand cookies filled with prunes are pretty gross, too. Besides that, I love it all. Pasztet, gyro pizza, everything. Ironically, my wife's palette is MUCH more refined. She doesn't eat bigos, pasztet, herring ANYTHING in aspic, and pretty much any Easter foods. So, this McDonald's raised American can't get enough of Kuchnia Polsa; and my Polish native wive would rather have a nice pasta.

P.S. Sourdough is of Egyptian origin, with recent popularity exploding in California, namely San Francisco during the era of the Gold Rush.
jon357 63 | 14,110
8 Aug 2012  #269
I was curious if it was common there.

It's normal in Poland and this part of Europe generally. Anything else is a novelty.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
8 Aug 2012  #270
Jon357,thank you for the answer.


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