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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


Chemikiem 7 | 2,371
11 Jan 2021 #901
flour coating gives the sufficient crispiness.

I see. I've never had soggy mushrooms when I've sauteed them, but the butter does need to be hot enough first. I wouldn't want them to be really crispy, but just cook them for longer if you do. Generally, I only fry pieczarki though, never tried fried oyster mushrooms.

this marrow is extremely fatty

Maybe not then, I thought it would be more meaty than fatty.

one really needs strong psyche.

I must admit to not liking fat in meat, unless it's marbling in an actual cut. It's one reason why I find black pudding so disgusting :(
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
11 Jan 2021 #902
I thought it would be more meaty than fatty.

Absolutely no meat in it. Pure fat of jelly texture.

I find black pudding so disgusting :(

Impossible! Haggis, too?
Chemikiem 7 | 2,371
12 Jan 2021 #903
Haggis, too?

I went to Scotland many moons ago and tried haggis while I was there. I really really liked it!

no meat in it. Pure fat of jelly texture

I'll pass on that then!
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
12 Jan 2021 #904
I really really liked it!

Aren`t those two dishes the same?

I'll pass on that then!

Good. Now you will be warned in case sb offers it to you.
jon357 63 | 15,526
13 Jan 2021 #905
Aren`t those two dishes the same?

Totally different. Black pudding is a bit like kaszanka (except you can slice it before or after cooking since it's not full of kasza that expands).

Haggis is made from lamb offal with spices and a bit of pearl barley that makes it expand a little when cooking. I've got a tin ready for Burns Night. Just a shame neeps are so hard to get here. Allegro sells them, however they look like varieties grown for animal feed so not like the tastier varieties grown as food.
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
13 Jan 2021 #906
a bit of pearl barley

But when I look at photos, the amount of that barley is quite adundant.
Anyway, if they differ in taste or ingredients, at least they possess similar texture.
jon357 63 | 15,526
13 Jan 2021 #907
More similar than black pudding and kaszanka however there are big differences.
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
22 hrs ago #908
My fav type of breakfast - I make it on special occasions. Here - Constitution Day. Salmon eggs, fish liver and sardines. With Hungarian Bull Blood wine.



Lenka 3 | 2,294
21 hrs ago #909
You really have a strange taste :)^


  • One of my favourites

  • Can you guess what this is?
mafketis 24 | 9,076
21 hrs ago #910
Hungarian Bull Blood wine.

Are you sure? Bull's Blood wine from Eger is "Egri Bikaver" and is technically a blend of couple of different types of wine, that bottle looks more like Kadarka (sometimes used in Bull's Blood in the past though much less so now....)

Can you guess what this is?

I'm afraid to say what it looks like...

here's a favorite seasonal breakfast of mine, white barszcz around Easter... or it would have been but the picture is too big 128 instead of 120.... oh well
Lenka 3 | 2,294
21 hrs ago #911
I'm afraid to say what it looks like...

Don't be afraid:)
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
21 hrs ago #912
One of my favourites

Scrambled eggs with ham or bacon and toasts. Typical British breakfast but without baked beans. :)

The second picture shows some fish in tomato sauce. Close to paprykarz szczeciński.

that bottle looks more like Kadarka (sometimes

Yes, maf, you are absolutely right, but I call all those types of Hungarian red dry wines Bull Blood. Kadarka is the same to me as Egri bikaver. My taste buds don`t recognise such subtle differences. Besides, it was for the sake of our American friends, Bull Blood sounds obvious while Kadarka means nothing to them.

ut the picture is too big 128 instead of 120.... oh well

120 isn`t enough. Even 100 sharp isn`t. I need to downsize below 100 to post pics.
Lenka 3 | 2,294
21 hrs ago #913
Scrambled eggs with ham or bacon and toasts.

You forgot the veggies. It wouldn't half as good without them!
But if we are talking English breakfast airs have my version: cooked sausage, hard boiled egg and again fresh veggies. Love it.

The second picture shows some fish in tomato sauce.

Mackerel :)

But since you mentioned English food...



OP pawian 176 | 14,291
18 hrs ago #914
You forgot the veggies.

No, I never forget anything about food. I just skipped them. hahaha

Mackerel in tomato sauce, then. Just like my wife. :):) I prefer fish in oil - I always drink this oil from the tin or spread it on my bread. Delicious!

As for this English food, I only recognise potatoes.
Lenka 3 | 2,294
17 hrs ago #915
I prefer fish in oil

I did as a kid but then I switched to tomato and now I don't even remember how the one in oil tastes like.

I only recognise potatoes.

Chicken with gravy and Yorkshire pudding
delphiandomine 87 | 18,433
17 hrs ago #916
I prefer fish in oil

I can't stand it. It makes fish seem incredibly greasy, with the sole exception of anchovies. Spreading the oil from anchovies on bread is remarkably delicious as you say!

but then I switched to tomato

Tomato is way superior if you ask me. It's not greasy, you can drain off the tomato easily, and it just doesn't have that...greasiness about it.
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
17 hrs ago #917
Aaa, yes, Yorkshire pudding, I knew I had seen it before, I showed it to students while in class but forgot the name of it.

It makes fish seem incredibly greasy,

Yes, and that`s the best in it. The greasier, the better. I love naturally oily fish too.

And what are they? My wife cooks this dish for kids, I don`t eat it unless I am desperate.



delphiandomine 87 | 18,433
17 hrs ago #918
And what are they?

Apple whateverthey'recalled with sugar powder. Not a fan. They're okay plain, but the sugar powder is revolting.
OP pawian 176 | 14,291
17 hrs ago #919
Yes, apple pancakes. I don`t like apples in dishes, so I prefer to abstain. And apple cake is not my cup of tea, either. :)

As for sugar powder, it is kids` preference. Normally, those pancakes can be a bit sour.
gumishu 11 | 5,508
5 hrs ago #920
or even cooked together with rice... but on their own... nope

chick peas are actually the best on their own - a can of chick peas serves as a proper meal
mafketis 24 | 9,076
5 hrs ago #921
Apple whateverthey'recalled

racuchy?

i used (both in the US and in Poland) used to experiment with different kinds of savory racuchy.... black beans were pretty good

another recent experiment was very thin mamałyga (polenta) mixed with a bit of flour, egg, parmesan and white cheese and made into a large pancake type thing... very yummy.

chick peas are actually the best on their own

a former roommate (back in the us) used to regularly make a meal of

one can of garbanzos
one can of beets
one package of cottage cheese

mixed together in a salad kind of thing... she claimed it was very nutritious but I was never that tempted to try...
delphiandomine 87 | 18,433
5 hrs ago #922
a can of chick peas serves as a proper meal

Fry them with tumeric and some other spices of your choosing, along with rice, kasza or similar and you've got an excellent meal.

Chickpeas are way superior to meat if you ask me.
mafketis 24 | 9,076
5 hrs ago #923
Fry them with tumeric and some other spices

My basic Spanish combo is tumeric (kurkuma) cumin (kmin rzymski) and a touch of cinnamon... (maybe a bit of cayenne for some heat)
Lenka 3 | 2,294
5 hrs ago #924
Fry them with tumeric and some other spices of your choosing

Dry and hard ones or tinned?


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