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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


jon357 65 | 14,420    
  6 Apr 2019  #511
Why not prepare it at home?

I usually do, though sometimes it's handier to buy.

I don't think you would find a place in the UK, that would serve tripe and onions

In Bradford, they serve(d) it raw with vinegar. Nasty. My granny used to batter and deep fry it in her chip shop (on Merseyside). Popular years ago, though you probably couldn't give it away free nowadays.
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
6 Apr 2019  #512
Oh yes, it's a lot blander than the German variety, that's for sure.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  6 Apr 2019  #513
egg custard tart. Not sure if we have anything similar in Poland. ?

I googled pics of it and I sometimes see similar cakes in pastry shops but my wife says they don`t belong here, must be imitations from foreign cuisines.

I was a kid I just left the cabbage on the plate. Now I don't mind it

You are a tough woman. :)

My fav way is herring ala Japanese - with a boiled egg and lost of raw onion and mayonaise.



Ironside 47 | 9,394    
6 Apr 2019  #514
Not sure if we have anything similar in Poland. ?

There is something that is pretty similar. images.app.goo.gl/JZfEhPH33Vsh8AZo9
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
6 Apr 2019  #515
Polish herring (sledz) is quite tasty.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
6 Apr 2019  #516
But it must be pickled/soused. I tried smoked and fried herring and the bones are hopeless - never again.
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
  6 Apr 2019  #517
Definitely, pawian. Especially in a light dill-cream sauce! Hmmm, soo good:-)

Whoops, almost forgot to add to my favorites list, a nice shot of Zubrowka after the meal.
Really settles the ol' stomach.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  6 Apr 2019  #518
Whoops, almost forgot to add to my favorites list, a nice shot of Zubrowka after the meal.

Only one? Come on .... Life is too short to have one shot only :)

PS.
I came back home at 7 pm and ate a giant plate of paella, thick, with an extra portion of shrimp and mussels. After an hour, I started to feel hungry again. It just came to my mind that Polish food must be so fatty and full of calories - how would Poles survive those harsh winters in the past and today?

A Vatican delegate to Poland wrote in his diaries a few hundred years ago - They eat little veg in Poland, but each Pole eats as much meat as 5 Italians.. A Polish saying from the time - An Italian thrives on lettuce, a Pole loses weight with it.

Once I hated fat in my meals, today I thrive on it.

Golonka - pork knuckles - one of the fattiest ingredients/dishes.

This two-pound piece of golonka is enough to feel full for a few days, not just hours. :):





Miloslaw 6 | 1,400    
6 Apr 2019  #519
Only one? Come on .... Life is too short to have one shot only :)

Totally agree......two?
Is three too much?
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
6 Apr 2019  #520
One bottle for two should be enough. If you are a hard drinker, let`s get two bottles.
mafketis 17 | 6,721    
6 Apr 2019  #521
Golonka - pork knuckles -

I would call golonka 'hamhock' (a southern US dish mostly, though not exclusively, associated with Blacks).
Miloslaw 6 | 1,400    
6 Apr 2019  #522
One bottle for two should be enough. If you are a hard drinker, let`s get two bottles.

I think that one bottle between two is more than enough......and I enjoy a drink.
jon357 65 | 14,420    
  7 Apr 2019  #523
I would call golonka 'hamhock'

In Yorkshire we called it pork hock. I used to buy them and boil them up. Cheap and tasty. The various Polish way of doing them can be good. Back when I ate pork, I braised them in beer and finished them off in the oven.

Sucking pig is an interesting Polish food, though only really for banquets. Stuffed with kasza and with an apple in the gob.

I think that one bottle between two is more than enough......and I enjoy a drink.

Better have a 0.7l in reserve. So you don't have to go to the beeroff in the middle of the night.
Bagel    
7 Apr 2019  #524
I love eggs in soup its so charming... im sure every culture has peasant foods
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
7 Apr 2019  #525
Golonki can be delicious, and that's a fact!

So similar to certain German dishes with which I grew up, such as "Eisbein" (as it's known in Berlin), I often barely noticed the transition to Polish cuisine

when I was over there, albeit far too briefly.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  7 Apr 2019  #526
I would call golonka 'hamhock' (a southern US dish mostly, though not exclusively, associated with Blacks).

I don`t mind, as long as it is tasty. :)

Cheap and tasty. The various Polish way of doing them can be good.

Yes, cheap. Actually the cheapest of all. Lucky me because I can be so mean. :) Tasty - abundantly. It is one of few kinds of pork which, when boiled long enough, offers such soft meat that it virtually melts on your tongue.

often barely noticed the transition to Polish cuisine

Yes, we must mention it in What do Poles owe to Germans thread :) The transition took place during partitions, so you couldn`t have noticed it.
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
7 Apr 2019  #527
Well now, you guys are neighbors, after all, if not exactly on the friendliest footing:-)
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  13 Apr 2019  #528
What do you think of fermented stuff? I like everything that tastes sour. E.g., one of my fav, fermented red beetroot juice is used to make traditional borsch soup or can be drunk solo. I have just had a morning glass of it. Some makers call it kvass.

Read about its beneficial influence.

articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/12/26/fermented-beets-benefits.aspx

See how to make it - put all the ingredients (celery, garlic, ginger, horseradish, herbs) into jars, pour on quality water and wait a few days.


  • The choice of side ingredients is individual - I simply add the stuff that I like



  • There are two schools for making borsch - sweet (fresh beetroot) or sour (fermented juice)
mafketis 17 | 6,721    
13 Apr 2019  #529
I like everything that tastes sour

I have to say I didn't much like sour things before moving to Poland.... the first time I heard of zupa ogórkowa I was aghast pickle soup? But now I love it, the more sour the the better.

Also, horseradish! I never liked it before living in Poland. But I think I only like Polish horseradish, a year or two ago in a Berlin hotel with soft-boiled eggs for breakfast I tried some horseradish... and it wasn't very good. I don't know why Poland does it better than other countries but it seems to be how it is.
jon357 65 | 14,420    
13 Apr 2019  #530
Also, horseradish!

I find it rather mild compared to the type I'm used to. The milder sort (depends how the root is grated) does work better in large quantity though.

Do you like ćwikła? I can take it or leave it, however home-made is much better than the usual stuff in PL from jars.
Dougpol1 28 | 2,470    
13 Apr 2019  #531
I tried horseradish... and it wasn't very good. I don't know why Poland does it better than other countries .....

Grow it in the garden, or your allotment. One theory from my father-in-law was that the plant needs very cold temperatures to lie dormant and regain it's "powers" but really not too sure what the secret is - maybe as with most tubers, divide and replant, but the horseradish in our garden in Dabrowa Gornicza is FIERCE:)

Grate and mix with sour cream, or beetroot juice.
Lyzko 20 | 5,987    
13 Apr 2019  #532
Ah, "kren"! The grandmother of all smelling salts:-)
jon357 65 | 14,420    
13 Apr 2019  #533
A lot of health benefits. The various sauces made round the world with it vary in two ways. One is whatwver is put in it to make it a sauce (and how much is added), the other is how much is grated from the outside or from the centre; this affects the heat. Polish tastes tend toward the mild and creamy.

The variety of plant varies too; the kind that people grow in Poland tends to have narrower leaves than the kind in the UK, and suits the dryer climate it grows in.

not too sure what the secret is

Well drained and rich soil. Keep it well-watered in summer, and harvest iafter the first frost. Don't pick all of it every year; leave some and it will grow like a weed.
mafketis 17 | 6,721    
13 Apr 2019  #534
Polish tastes tend toward the mild and creamy.

Me too. Don't get me wrong I love heat, just more from chillis than horseradish, when I still lived in the US I regularly devoured mass amounts of chillis in various ways, generally red (or occasionally fresh green, but preserved green chillis... it's off to the bathroom and not a pretty process).
jon357 65 | 14,420    
13 Apr 2019  #535
I once made a sauce from chillies, horseradish and (English) mustard powder. It took no prisoners!
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
13 Apr 2019  #536
however home-made is much better than the usual stuff in PL from jars.

Do you suggest you know of some usual jar stuff which is better than home made one? :):)

Grow it in the garden, or your allotment.

Thanks for the idea, I must try it out.

I love heat, just more from chillis than horseradish,

Both are good to eat hot, but chilli heat remains long in the mouth while horseradish quickly fades away

But I think I only like Polish horseradish,

Is it by chance this producer? I have tried a few horseradish jar products and this one has been the tastiest, since 1970s I guess.



delphiandomine 85 | 17,470    
13 Apr 2019  #537
I once made a sauce from chillies, horseradish and (English) mustard powder. It took no prisoners!

I've noticed recently that Poles are starting to really acquire a taste for spicy food. I've fallen in love with those chili olive oils that are available now,

Do you suggest you know of some usual jar stuff which is better than home made one? :):)

I was once suffering with a ridiculous amount of work at the end of the school year, and so I bought some meatballs in a jar from Biedronka.

Worst idea ever.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  13 Apr 2019  #538
so I bought some meatballs in a jar from Biedronka. Worst idea ever.

Yes, as the old saying goes, even the dog refused to eat it. Or, a quote from Bareja film - Are you crazy? Stop feeding it to the dog, do you want to poison her? :):)

I think everybody has had such an experience in their life.
Miloslaw 6 | 1,400    
13 Apr 2019  #539
I once made a sauce from chillies, horseradish and (English) mustard powder. It took no prisoners!

That would have been fierce!!!!
Chillies are of course the hottest,but English mustard is even stronger than Dijon.....and add the Polish horseradish and next day is mainly spent in the bathroom.... LOL!!!
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  13 Apr 2019  #540
English mustard is even stronger than Dijon.

Really? I thought Russian mustard is the strongest of all. It has 2 or 3 chilli symbols on the label, while the English mustard has only one.


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