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Posts by Polonius3  

Joined: 11 Apr 2008 / Male ♂
Warnings: 1 - Q
Last Post: 9 Apr 2018
Threads: Total: 983 / In This Archive: 289
Posts: Total: 12333 / In This Archive: 906
From: US Sterling Heigths, MI
Speaks Polish?: yes
Interests: Polish history, genealogy

Displayed posts: 1195 / page 5 of 40
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Polonius3   
15 Oct 2009
Genealogy / Kintop surname [8]

The original German name was probably spelt Köntopf (ö is often spelt oe when the letter ö is not available). Meaning obscure.
Polonius3   
15 Oct 2009
Language / TELEPHONE GENDER WOES? [11]

How can one neutrally say:
Czy może Pan/Pani mi powiedzieć...
Czy Pana/Pani aparat ma tarczę czy klawisze?
Kto w Pańskiej/Pani (Waszej might be an option here?!) firmie zajmuje się tym lub tamtym?
Polonius3   
15 Oct 2009
Life / PYTA ANYONE? [11]

Anyone familiar with the good old-fashion Polish pyta -- a kind of cat-o-nine-tails? I don't think it necessarily had to have 9 leather strands.
Unlike today's "political correctness" with its absolute ban on corporal punishment, this was used as needed so as not to raise kids that turn out like today's selfish, molly-coddled brats. Ever hear of it or feel its well-deserved sting on your hide? Any comments?
Polonius3   
14 Oct 2009
News / IS NOBLE WINNER SZOSTAK POLISH? [68]

Oct 14, 09, 23:01 - Thread attached on merging:
SZOSTAK REACTIVATION: POLISH ROOTS ASCERTAINED!

Althouhg the original thread has been closed down by our moderator, I have since obtained info re Szostak's Polish roots. An acquaintance of mine has contacted him and Szostak said his grandfather had come from Poland but he himself has little knowledge about his Polish heritage.
Polonius3   
13 Oct 2009
Language / TELEPHONE GENDER WOES? [11]

Caps lock + laziness. When I got nearr the end and looked up and found only caps, I was too lazy to re-type the whole thing the normal way. Sorry about that. This was not intentional.
Polonius3   
11 Oct 2009
Language / Slang words like man, dude [29]

There is a very fine line between slang and colloquial speech. Slang either comes and goes or becomes colloquial. Such words as dude, bloke, chap, guy are probably classifiable as colloquial but not long were very slangy.

In Polish, jegomość once was slang for bloke but now is on the archaic side, but gość is still used.
Fajny has had quite a long lifespan but still is slang. So is cool in English.
But klawy and swell are not heard all that often anymore.
Polonius3   
11 Oct 2009
Language / TELEPHONE GENDER WOES? [11]

Indeed, some questions can be rendered neutral and impersonal, but not all:
Could I ask for YOUR cellphone number?
Where does YOUR brother work? Do YOU personally know anyone in the the accounting dept? Could I leave the parcel for Mr Kwiatkowski with YOU?
Polonius3   
11 Oct 2009
Language / TELEPHONE GENDER WOES? [11]

HAS ANYONE EVER RUNG UP SOME INSTITUION, COMPANY, ETC. AND NOT BEEN ABLE TO TELL BY THE VOICE WHETHER THE INTERLOCUTOR WAS A MAN OR WOMAN? THERE IS A BORDERLINE AREA BETWEEN A HIGH-PITCHED MALE VOICE AND LOW-PITCHED FEMALE ONE WHERE IT IS DIFFICULT TO TELL. USING THE POLISH PAN/PANI FORM OF YOU, WHAT DO YOU DO?

HOW DO YOU SAY: COULD YOU TELL ME WHEN HE MIGHT BE IN? or even: IS THAT YOUR CAR BLOCKING MY DRIVEWAY? (pański or pani samochód?)

Why the upper case letters?
Polonius3   
10 Oct 2009
Life / Polish funerals-no coffins inside a church ?? [5]

Totally untrue! Every Catholic burial incldues a mass during which the coffin on a carafalque stands in front of the main altar. This may be at the parish church of the deceased or a cemtery chapel, as the family prefers.
Polonius3   
9 Oct 2009
Food / AMERICANO COFFEE IN POLAND? [14]

Po turecku is a misnomer, because the real Turkish coffee is made in a special long-handled pot and the ground cofee and water (often suagr added) comes to a boil. What Poles call po turecku is simply steeped coffee that is never cooked.
Polonius3   
7 Oct 2009
Life / WHAT DO YOUNG POLES SEE IN RAP CRAP? [63]

One can perhaps understand that the primtive monosyllabic gruntings of bird-brained US slum-dwellers who don't know who their father was might appeal to those who live in rat-infested slums because they don't know any better. But what do some young Poles see in that ignorant cacaphony? It is alien to them musically (if you can call it music in the first place?!), ideologically (appeals to rape, kill, destroy) and culturally (most Poles know how to read and write and were not born out-of-wedlock).

It must be a take-off on Hitler's big lie. if you repeat it often enough, people will believe it. The DJs keep playing rap crap over and over until it infects the brains of people who have nothing in common with the underbelly cultture that produced it. And to think some are complaining about disco-polo!?

Agree? Disagree?
Polonius3   
5 Oct 2009
News / IS NOBLE WINNER SZOSTAK POLISH? [68]

London-born Jack Szostak, 56, at Harvard Medical School since 1979 and professor of genetics at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, was among this year's Nobel Prize winners in medicine. Judging by his name (Szóstak?) and London birthplace he might be the descendnat of post-WW2 DP émigrés. Anyone know for sure?
Polonius3   
5 Oct 2009
USA, Canada / Can you order Oscypek in the US? [25]

Any names or addresses?

Merged: US POLISH CHEESE IMPORTER?

Anyone know of an importer in the US who imports Polish sheep's milk cheese oscypek to America? According to some reports I have heard, oscypek does not conform to US health specifications. Any truth to that?
Polonius3   
5 Oct 2009
USA, Canada / Can you order Oscypek in the US? [25]

Merged: OSCYPEK (POLISH CHEESE) IN AMERICA?

Anyone know where oscypek (Polish sheep's-milk cheese) can be obtained in the USA: importer, distributor, wholesaler, retail outlets?
Polonius3   
2 Oct 2009
Genealogy / Fathers name Szulc [6]

SZULC - The German word Schultheiß (hamlet chief or village mayor) was the source of the Polish adaptation sołtys (same meaning). However, in dialectic German the term was Schulze and that form evolved into a surname spelt Schulze, Schultz and Schulz.

Its Polonised version Szulc is quite popular in Poland, in fact around 25,000 Poels use that surname. The biggest concentrations are in northern Poland's Gdańsk adn Bydgoszcz areas. Without knowign the area of Poland if not the exact locality your ancestor hailed from, it may be well nigh impossible even for a professional geenalogist to track down your roots. But good luck anyway!
Polonius3   
27 Sep 2009
Life / Communion, why do only half of church-goers in Poland take it? [41]

Communion services take place in different Chrisitian churches. The difference is that it is viewed as simply a symbolic memento of the Last Supper. Catholics and Eastern Orthodox believe in transubstantiation, ie that bread and wine truly become the body and blood of Christ. It is therefore sacrilegous to ingest the Eucharist into a sin-stained body that is not in the state of sancrifying grace.
Polonius3   
26 Sep 2009
History / The Battle of Vienna - Poland helped save Europe [57]

With the benefit of hindsight most every failure can be explained as a blunder. The point is when things are happening about one and quick decisions need to be taken, it is usually difficult to accurately predict how things will turn out.

The cowardly Czechs played ball with the Nazis and Reds and their country was not destroyed. I wonder if the London-based Polish Govt in Exile somehow knew that Poland would be betrayed by its allies at Yalta and Potsdam and was in for 45 years of Soviet enslavement, would they have called for the Uprising nonetheless.
Polonius3   
26 Sep 2009
History / The Battle of Vienna - Poland helped save Europe [57]

Poland saved Europe from invading godless hordes on several occasions:
- in the 13th century at the Battle of Legnica - the Polish leader Bolesław was killed in battle, but the thrust of the Tatar invasion of Europe was broken.

- The Battle of Vienna is obvious
- the 1920 Mriacle of the Vistula routed the Bolshevik hordes trying to sppread their communist poison throuhgout Europe
- although not a one-off encounter, Polish Poznań in 1956, 1968 student disturbances, worker riots in 1970 and 1976 and the Solidarność revolution all set the stage for the overthrow of the iron curtain after 1989.
Polonius3   
22 Sep 2009
Language / POLISH ETHNIC PEJORATIVES [23]

I think szkop came about to poke fun at the large and deep German army helmets whose shape reminded Poles of a cow-milking bucket (skop, szkop, szkopek, szkopik). They were nonetheless far safer than the skimpy, shallow British helmets which left the neck exposed.

English nicks include: Kraut (from sauerkraut), Jerry (a play on German), Hun (invading hordes), square head (typical of German Nordics) and Dutchman (through confusion with Deutsch)
Polonius3   
21 Sep 2009
Language / POLISH ETHNIC PEJORATIVES [23]

Like every languaeg, Polish has its own pejorative expressions for different national/ethnic groups. These include:
JANKES - American
COMMON POLISH ETHNIC PEJORATIVES:
SZWAB - German
KACAP - Russian (anyone know the etymology thereof?)
HAHO£ - Ukrainian (probably because of their pronouncing many Polish G-words as an H?)
MOSIEK - Jew
ŻÓ£TEK - oriental in general
KITAJEC - Chinaman
JAPONIEC - Jap
ŻABOJAD - Frenchman
PEPICZEK - Czech
MAKARONIARZ - Italian
WIEB£ĄDZIARZ - Arab
CZARNUCH, ASFALT - Negro
Of fairly recent vintage are: ANGOL (Englishman), BRYTOL (BRit), KANADOL (Canadian), KATOL (Catholic)...
Do you know of any others for the above or others pertaining to nationalities not listed?
Polonius3   
20 Sep 2009
Life / Getting married in Polska - some advice required about mixing traditions [27]

There are countless Polish wedding traditons, some regional, but the basic ones are the following:

PARENTAL BLESSING: if all four parents are not present, deceased, etc., an uncle, aunt, godparents or other older rellive can fill in. At the bride's home the couple kneel as the parents bestow their blessing and sprinkle them with holy water.

NUPTIAL AT CHURCH: the officiating clergyman will know what to do.

BREAD & SALT WELCOME: at the entrance to the wedding-party venue the bride and groom are greeted with bread, salt and vodka/wine on a tray.

MONEY DANCE: male guests pay for a chance to dance with the bride; in today's feminist era, female guests get to dance with the groom. The collected cash is cradle money for the future offpsirng.

BECAPPING/UNVEILING: the bride's veil is ritually removed and a traditonal matron's cap is plaed on her head amid the singing of traditonal songs, signifying her passage from maidenhood (virignity?) to wifehood.

There are many games of recent vintage whcih the band or wedding oragnisers can conduct.
Polonius3   
20 Sep 2009
Life / The Elderly and their Psyche in Poland. [20]

Like all traditons, respect for ther dead in whatever form is a matter of prevailing convention. Someone who does not provide his loved one with what is generally regarded in a given community as a suitable tomb enclosure may be ostracised by his peers as disprespective or even downright mean. Many if not most people are concerned about what others think of them. That applies to most everything. How many younger folk pretend to like sushi, techno, certain clothes and pastimes because of peer pressure. It's not accpeted in many circles not to like something regarded as trendy and cutting egde.
Polonius3   
19 Sep 2009
Food / Gloria Jeans Coffee's Warsaw [13]

American-style coffee popular in Turkey? Almost like taking coals to NewCastle or selling snow to Eskimos!!!
Polonius3   
19 Sep 2009
Genealogy / GLAZOWSKI RELATIVES,ORIGIN,WRZOSY,TORUN [4]

Sep 19, 09, 21:30 - Thread attached on merging:
CZOBOT G£AZOWSKI ŻYDACZEWSKI SZEJNOWSKI FIWEK SZUBA

CZOBOT - padded-top boot

G£AZOWSKI - toponymic nick from Głazów (Rockville)

ŻYDACZEWSKI - toponymic nick from Żydaczew or Żydaczewo (Jewtown)

SZEJNOWSKI - possibly patronymic nick from 'szejne-morejne' (humorous saying for a Jew who had achieved Polish noble status)

FIWEK - possibly a variant of fifak (clever guy, sharpie), adapted fromt he German adj. pfiffig (clever)

SZUBSKI - possibly from szuba (old-style fur-lined cloak)
Polonius3   
17 Sep 2009
Food / Recipe for Polish potato noodle stew/soup/meatball [11]

Don't śląskie have to include potato starch, whilst pyzy do not? But probably there is no hard and fast rule, as Polish cooks like to experiment and have long been known to make do and improvise.