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Communion, why do only half of church-goers in Poland take it?


mylesg 7 | 14  
27 Sep 2009 /  #1
I have now been to two Masses in Poland (in two different cities). The church is full- but when it comes to receiving Communion; it seems that only about 1/2 the church-goers go up to receive it. Curious if anyone knows why? At our church in the states, you always see a few not receiving the host, but I was surprised at 1/2.
OsiedleRuda  
27 Sep 2009 /  #2
if you knew what us Poles get up to, you would understand why, lol
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #3
It's rather disrespectful not to partake in the ceremony. My guess is that many people here are just bandwagon jumpers, stating themselves as Catholic Christians without really knowing what that means. Who here can quote Corinthians without Googling it? I asked my students this and they probably thought I was talking about a Brazilian football team ;) ;) ;)

1 Corinthians 11:24. If they truly understood the significance of this, the essence of Jesus's sacrifice, they would get off their butts and pay their tributes. No tolerance for sacrilege!!
Ireland32 2 | 172  
27 Sep 2009 /  #4
The church is full- but when it comes to receiving Communion; it seems that only about 1/2 the church-goers go up to receive it. Curious if anyone knows why

It would be custom in Ireland amongst regular mass goers that unless you are 'in the state of grace', having confessed your sins and your soul cleansed, then you should not receive the sacrament of holy communion. It also used to be a custom that you had to fast for 1 hour before mass if you were going to receive the body of christ.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #5
Still, minor inconveniences for what Jesus did for mankind. If you don't understand the implications and significance of calling yourself sth, don't call yourself that. Pure and simple! If you do, be prepared to explain it to others as labels are fragmenting society in today's current global environment.

Communion should not be a take it or leave it idea, true Christians will honour it for obvious reasons!
Ireland32 2 | 172  
27 Sep 2009 /  #6
Communion should not be a take it or leave it idea, true Christians will honour it for obvious reasons

That is why devote Catholics in Ireland frown on the receiving of communion by those who do not confess their sins. I believe they are right.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #7
Devout Catholics simply know the procedures better and that's largely what places them apart.
Ireland32 2 | 172  
27 Sep 2009 /  #8
true Christians will honour it for obvious reasons

Correct me if im wrong for asking this question....Do all Christians religions partake in the sacrament of communion or is it only Catholics. I mean does Church of England, Methodist, Baptist etc receive communion on a regular basis?
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #9
It's very much a Catholic idea. Some missalettes may shed some light on the matter but it is my understanding that non-Catholics need permission from a diocesan bishop and also have recourse to Canon Law. In theory, there is a verse in John which attempts to bridge this schism but, in practice, it's impractical.

It is easier for prawosławny (eastern orthodox) followers as they are more closely allied to the sacraments than Protestants are. Protestants theoretically can receive the Communion and I think it is when, in very rare cases, there is a grave threat of death or a blockade which doesn't enable it in their own religion (no-one to consummate it etc etc).
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446  
27 Sep 2009 /  #10
Communion services take place in different Chrisitian churches. The difference is that it is viewed as simply a symbolic memento of the Last Supper. Catholics and Eastern Orthodox believe in transubstantiation, ie that bread and wine truly become the body and blood of Christ. It is therefore sacrilegous to ingest the Eucharist into a sin-stained body that is not in the state of sancrifying grace.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #11
Interesting point that, Pol3. On a less strict level, Lithuanians, Latvians, Finns and Estonians all believe bread to be the food of God and it is sacrilege to treat it as anything less. However, of those 4, only Lithuania is truly a Catholic country.

What are your thoughts on that?

Communion services do take place in different Christian churches but the critical point is baptism. It is the ultimate form of cleansing and is ultra-Catholic.
szkotja2007 27 | 1,498  
27 Sep 2009 /  #12
I mean does Church of England, Methodist, Baptist etc receive communion on a regular basis?

The Free Church of Scotland dont.
CacyUlcia 2 | 46  
27 Sep 2009 /  #13
Ireland32

It would be custom in Ireland amongst regular mass goers that unless you are 'in the state of grace', having confessed your sins and your soul cleansed, then you should not receive the sacrament of holy communion. It also used to be a custom that you had to fast for 1 hour before mass if you were going to receive the body of christ.

There's no other custom but this one that's practiced by Polish Roman Catholics as well.

If they truly understood the significance of this, the essence of Jesus's sacrifice, they would get off their butts and pay their tributes.

My guess is that many people here are just bandwagon jumpers, stating themselves as Catholic Christians without really knowing what that means.

All Polish Catholics had to learn catechism as children, thererefore they do know what it means to be Roman Catholic, and the significance of the sacrament. They also reflect upon catechism where they can properly determine if they are WORTHY to receive the sacrament. Have you ever done that?

It's rather disrespectful not to partake in the ceremony.

It is rather disrespectful to receivethe sacrament without reflecting on your conscience within the catechism: It's rather false pride.
:o)

Do all Christians religions partake in the sacrament of communion or is it only Catholics.

Yes. Although it's bit different. It's very rare to see Roman Catholics to drink wine, "drinking the blood of Christ" ritual is usually performed at a wedding ceremony. :)
ftggoP 2 | 27  
27 Sep 2009 /  #14
It's rather disrespectful not to partake in the ceremony.

actually Seanus you're just unfamiliar with Polish custom. In Poland one only goes to take communion if one was at confession not too long ago. It is considered disrespectful going to communion if you haven't been to confession (or in church for that matter) for 2 years or so as everyone does it here in the US.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
27 Sep 2009 /  #15
I got 100% in RE at school and Scotland has many Catholics, friends of mine to this day. That's funny, why can't they tell me what it means to them when I ask them? When I present the arguments of advanced theologians, they look dumbfounded. Why?

Ftggop, why don't people avoid going to Communion until they are ready and in the state of grace? Why don't they wait to confess and absolve their sins, then go when there are no blockades/barriers? All it takes is an hour out of their working week or even go on the weekend. What's the problem? Surely 'sitting out' is one of the biggest sins and attacks on their conscience, no?
CacyUlcia 2 | 46  
28 Sep 2009 /  #16
Surely 'sitting out' is one of the biggest sins and attacks on their conscience, no?

NO? As long as it's God's will to make you still at 'sitting out', and know that he is GOD.

:o)
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #17
Surely the ceremony has the utmost symbolic importance and shouldn't be an opt-out situation. Why do they even go if they don't take part? Fine, it's their exercising of will but it's a half measure.
ftggoP 2 | 27  
28 Sep 2009 /  #18
they go so that they can be in church. I think going to communion without going to confession in 2 years is worse
sadieann 2 | 205  
28 Sep 2009 /  #19
utmost symbolic importance and shouldn't be an opt-out situation

Agree. Perhaps, those that have refrained from Communion would post their reasons? Personally, I have never opted out.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #20
I really respect that, ftggoP. I am the same, I went inside the churches in Lithuania (and the Baltic states generally) as I love the serenity that comes from it. Here too. I also went in the Balkans.

I agree on the second point too. For me, having faith and feeling God around me is important but Catholics pride themselves on being practising Christians. I was talking with a very proud Catholic who lost interest due to the death of JPII. If you can feel that God is always with you then you are doing sth right :) :)
pgtx 30 | 3,156  
28 Sep 2009 /  #21
Why do they even go if they don't take part?

that's fake, double-faced Catholicism in PL... Poles go to church to shut their neighbors up...
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #22
Wreście, thanks for that pgtx. I still believe that being there is a great gesture and act in and of itself but why would I attend an army tribute, for example, as an army man and not take part?

What of Ephesians and 'good works'? Surely good works could be done by honouring time-honoured traditions like Communion. Protestants believe in faith alone which isn't entirely correct either but doesn't enter the murky waters of 'good works'.
CacyUlcia 2 | 46  
28 Sep 2009 /  #23
Poles go to church to shut their neighbors up...

Why do they even go if they don't take part?

they go so that they can be in church

4. to find peace: to get a sense of heavenly peace.
5. to learn how to establish union and be unified within the holy spirit.
6. to learn how to distinguish pure truth.
7. to find depth in knowledge: to learn how to think wisely
8. to save their youth from hell.
9. to learn how to find blessings for their family and how to live as a family.

...................

101. The humble and the meek Poles go to church to get entertained (just like some people would go to live Theaters for entertainment).
102. It a major highlight of the week for the humble and meek Poles: a major social event! (just like the MTV music awards for celebrities).

109. The women want to show off their fashion, their fancy family, and check out the fashion of other women.

........
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #24
4) Fair enough. Peace can be found in many places though, through meditation and many other means

5) Catechisms para 2010, right? What is charis (grace)? It is unmerited favour, Cacy. Works righteousness salvation is contrary to the Bible anyway. Please read Rom 3.28 and 11.6 to me. How about 1 Tim 2.5?

6) We both have truths, are mine the same as yours? ;) (Jesus Christ Superstar, 39 lashes scene)

7) Go and consult a sage :)

8) Through an ill-defined concept of works, striving for salvation that you never know if you will attain? He finished the work on the cross (John 19.30). Faith itself is the best work

9) That's a social question learned through doing

101) Entertained? I don't know, I don't wanna second guess their motives/intentions ;) ;)

102) Dunno, would have to ask them ;)

109) Possibly :)
pgtx 30 | 3,156  
28 Sep 2009 /  #25
4. to find peace: to get a sense of heavenly peace.
5. to learn how to establish union and be unified within the holy spirit.
6. to learn how to distinguish pure truth.
7. to find depth in knowledge: to learn how to think wisely
8. to save their youth from hell.
9. to learn how to find blessings for their family and how to live as a family.

5%...

101. The humble and the meek Poles go to church to get entertained (just like some people would go to live Theaters for entertainment).
102. It a major highlight of the week for the humble and meek Poles: a major social event! (just like the MTV music awards for celebrities).
109. The women want to show off their fashion, their fancy family, and check out the fashion of other women.

95%...
tornado2007 11 | 2,274  
28 Sep 2009 /  #26
I'm surprised many Polish women go to church, i mean its just not cool anymore, let alone outdated and for those who can't lead their own lives by their own rules and morals.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #27
Besides, I believe that there is a clear biblical basis for imputation and not infusion. For proof, see Rom 4.3 - 25, Rom 3.10, Phil 3.9 and Rom 10.3.

Christ died for the very reason of imputing righteousness. To say otherwise is to add sth that was never really there. I can quote numerous biblical sources to support this contention.

Anyway, we need the Mods nod of approval as we shouldn't be discussing religious stuff.
Ireland32 2 | 172  
28 Sep 2009 /  #28
Why do they even go if they don't take part?

There are many other parts to the mass besides communion.

Perhaps, those that have refrained from Communion would post their reasons?

I am divorced. I went to confession to confess my sins and the priest told me that the Church did not recognise divorce. in the eyes of the Church and God I was still married. I felt ashamed.
CacyUlcia 2 | 46  
28 Sep 2009 /  #29
I'm surprised many Polish women go to church, i mean its just not cool anymore, let alone outdated and for those who can't lead their own lives by their own rules and morals.

I know. You use to think it was pretty hot when your mama took you. Then when you were old enough to walk, it wasn't cool when your Babci took you by the hand either. True. But nowadays....there's fans and cool air conditions, so it's cool.

I stay cool within. But everybody has their own temperature.
Seanus 15 | 19,706  
28 Sep 2009 /  #30
For example, Ireland32?

Marriage is a social construct, not strictly a biblical construct. Also, see Catechism n1651. It calls for sensitivity and the continued effort to do good deeds in order to maintain the spirit of the individual. Still, it is against Catholicism generally.

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