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Can foreigner buy apartment in Warsaw, Poland?


aileen_china 1 | 1
8 Jan 2013  #1
I am from China ,and i am wondering if it is possible for me to buy a apartment for rent in Warsaw? if i can .what are the actual procedures for foreigners to acquire such property?can foreigner rent it even who not live there? which kinds of tax i need to pay ?and how much it is? thanks for answers and opinions.
gumishu 11 | 5,012
8 Jan 2013  #2
yes, you can - there is no council tax in Poland on flats you only pay rent (council tax is already paid in rent) - there is a onetime tax payment when buying a flat (it's about 20 per cent value of the flat)

real-estate-poland.maxon.pl

oh wait - now I am not sure - I know for sure that EU nationals are allowed to buy flats in Poland just as Poles but I am not sure about non-EU nationals

but you can surely rent a flat - it does not matter if you live there or not
jon357 63 | 14,122
8 Jan 2013  #3
Yes. The only restrictions relate to farmland and those restrictions are temporary.

The procedure for buying a flat is the same wherever you are from. You can rent a flat to whoever you like, however you may find that real estate here is more expensive that you would expect due to a population spike of people around a certain age and a poor supply of new build apartments.
gumishu 11 | 5,012
8 Jan 2013  #4
there is a onetime tax payment when buying a flat (it's about 20 per cent value of the flat)

I have greatly exaggerated the tax - it is 2 per cent of the value of a flat (property) when buying
jon357 63 | 14,122
8 Jan 2013  #5
A sort of stamp duty. The OP should be aware about tax liabilities when selling before a certain period has elapsed or at any time if the flat is above 250sqm or has a residents'-only swimming pool.
Zibi - | 336
8 Jan 2013  #6
a poor supply of new build apartments

At least in Warsaw that is certainly not the case. Also the OP should remember about Real Estate tax and/or Tax on Perpetual Usufruct, depending what he/she buys.
jon357 63 | 14,122
8 Jan 2013  #7
I don't see so much being built now compared to the boom of a few years ago. The market seems to have stabilised.
OP aileen_china 1 | 1
9 Jan 2013  #8
thanks for these information ,i also heard that i need a permit from the Polish government before i buy it .it is true or not?
MoOli 9 | 484
27 Jan 2013  #10
I dont know if you know the difference between a town home and a condominium?In Poland you need no permit to buy a condominium, but being a non EU passport holder you do need permission to buy land(any kind) and a house(since land is involved) there are other ways to get around it ...popular one is to make a small company other is spouse name(if u are married) if they Polish passport holders.In Poland most flats are condominiums, but check it out as some commercial places are also same.You have to get somebody reliable to go to the respective municipal registry court and get the papers the morning before you close as NOTARIUSZ (Polish lawyer for both seller and buyer) mostly is a fuked up person who plays with his rules and believes (tamed by commies as an exclusive breed which still exists)Poles are so worried if foreigners buy there land they will steal it:))and run away:))
Thing 2 | 9
22 Oct 2013  #11
Merged: How can a foreigner buy a property (flat) in Poland?

Hi everybody ,,

Other than cash , because I don't have it , is there a system where I can pay for example 20000zl first advance and monthly 3000zl-4000zl until I pay the full price?

My bank won't give me a mortgage loan here since I'm a non-working student. But there must be another way , like agencies or lawyers who does that kind of thing , with whatever guarantees and papers they need me to sign. I know the price will get higher that way , but it's okay with me. any suggestions? ideas?

Thank you,
I live in Poznan by the way.
DominicB - | 2,672
22 Oct 2013  #12
Ain't going to happen. Dream on. Banks loan money to those who they know can pay back. As a "non-working student", you are clearly not in that club, and won't be for quite some time, that is, until after you graduate, find a well-paid and stable job, and establish a clean credit history and sufficient savings.

There's nothing any lawyer can do for you, or anybody else.
smurf 39 | 1,982
22 Oct 2013  #13
Yea, it can be done.
I've got mates who have 'bought' apartments this way.

Basically someone owns the apartment block/building. Someone moves out and you take over their flat. Pay a large deposit and make monthly/quarterly payments

It's not legal and it's as dodgy as hell, but it can be done.
I wouldn't do it and I wouldn't advise doing it either, the reason being you're at the whim of a landlord who may someday want his flat back (probably sometime before your final payment) and you'll get turfed out with hardly a leg to stand on legally.

Pure dodge, avoid.
Steveramsfan 2 | 306
22 Oct 2013  #14
I just bought a flat in Lodz but I paid cash. This was the only way as no financial establishment would lend me the money.

Now I have a flat and a residency card I can now take out a mortgage. I just don't need it anymore.
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
22 Oct 2013  #15
Someone moves out and you take over their flat.

Eh?

What, some stranger takes over a non-resident owner's mortgage and then lives in the place? Why would he want to do that, paying a hefty deposit and large monthly rent payments?? You could rent a legitimate flat for much less. Are you suggesting the owner will in time "sell" the flat to the stranger in return for these payments? You ain't kidding when you said pure dodge, it would need a heck of a lot of trust on the part of the stranger making these payments in hope and good faith.
legate - | 46
22 Oct 2013  #16
It can be done, but your problem will be to find a seller interested in that kind of deal. Basically a flat can be paid in installments but most of the sellers want to get the full purchase price at once.

The second option is to take a mortgage jointly with your parents who can prove their solvency to a bank.
smurf 39 | 1,982
22 Oct 2013  #17
paying a hefty deposit and large monthly rent payments

My mates paid about 10,000 (not sure about the others as I never asked) and their rent is small too. I suppose it was hefty for them, but then again, it's buttons really.

The official 'owner' is still listed as living there, but in reality these new people do and will until the final 'rent' when the owner will transfer ownership to these new peps.

Ah yea, it's pure dodge and I think the 2 pairs of them are clowns for doing it. But it was their choice, they were advised not to go along with it by quiet a few, but then again it seems to be a not so uncommon thing here in Kato.
Steveramsfan 2 | 306
22 Oct 2013  #18
Organised Crime must be involved somewhere. I wouldn't want to go near this sort of deal.
Harry
22 Oct 2013  #19
n reality these new people do and will until the final 'rent' when the owner will transfer ownership to these new peps.

Why would he do that? And what can they do about it if he doesn't?!
InWroclaw 89 | 1,915
22 Oct 2013  #20
I think the 2 pairs of them are clowns for doing it.

That's what I think, for the reason Harry mentions. But interesting stuff, thanks for posting it, I never realised this sort of thing happens, but maybe I'm just not 'street' enough :D

Why would he do that? And what can they do about it if he doesn't?!

Eggs act lee.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
23 Oct 2013  #21
Smurf: My mates paid about 10,000 (not sure about the others as I never asked) and their rent is small too.

Is this a "community" flat?
It kinda has to be unless they are related.
There would have to be a contract, no body's that stupid... are they?
smurf 39 | 1,982
23 Oct 2013  #22
And what can they do about it if he doesn't?!

I don't know Harry. I think it's ludicrous, but I dug a bit deeper last night and asked one of them. He told me that he has 6 mates all living in the city centre who live under the same conditions.

There would have to be a contract, no body's that stupid... are they?

Just a verbal agreement AFAIK.
I wouldn't go anywhere near a deal like this.

The thing I cannot understand is what's going to happen when:
a) someone becomes jobless and cannot afford to pay the rent or
b) God forbid, but what if down the line when parents die and what are the kids left with?

Fools and their money......
grubas 12 | 1,391
23 Oct 2013  #23
Ah yea, it's pure dodge and I think the 2 pairs of them are clowns for doing it.

Why?It's called "Rent till you own" in the US and it can be better deal than the mortgage.It is simply a different way of paying for something.Instead of borrowing money from the bank you basically borrow from the owner.Treat rent as interest on loan and there you go.Of course there also tax issues,value of money in time and so on involved but everything can be calculated.
Harry
23 Oct 2013  #24
a) someone becomes jobless and cannot afford to pay the rent or

It's not only that: with nothing entered into the Land & Mortgage Register, your friends have precisely zero legal claim to the property.

smurf: Ah yea, it's pure dodge and I think the 2 pairs of them are clowns for doing it.

Thanks for giving us views from a village in the USA, but if you really can't understand why it's a bad idea to invest a large amount of money in a property which one has no legal claim to, you really should leave this conversation for the grown-ups.
smurf 39 | 1,982
23 Oct 2013  #25
your friends have precisely zero legal claim to the property

Yep, I know, tried telling them that, but they're so tight they think this is a good option.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
23 Oct 2013  #26
Basically someone owns the apartment block/building

That only makes sense if the 'someone' is an entity like a spoldzielnia.

Even then it'd be mad not to have written contract.

If not I have a car your friends can 'buy' ;-)
Crow 137 | 7,595
29 Oct 2013  #27
alright, foreigner can buy a property in Poland but, is there any limitation how much of his private property he can poses in Poland?
polsk2016 1 | 4
7 Mar 2015  #28
Merged: Permit for US citizen to purchase flat?

Im an american with polish ancestry looking to purchase a flat in Polska as an investment to rent out; then relocate after i retire; i know you have to have a permit to buy farmland; but would i need a permit to but a flat? Also planning on placing a 25% downpayment then seeing if theres any monthly plan payment, anyone have any info on this, thanks for your help
jon357 63 | 14,122
7 Mar 2015  #29
No, no problem buying a flat however forget about getting credit within Poland for it.
tjolson55 - | 1
25 Oct 2015  #30
Merged: What documents does US citizen need to purchase home in Poland?

What documents does US citizen need to give Polish government in order to get permission to purchase a home in Poland?


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