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Do Poles have a problem understanding American English?


Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
21 Jan 2014 #61
My style of writing is literate and my words well chosen. Kindly don't project your own mediocre English writing if it doesn't measure up to my level!

Your English actually isn't half bad, I must admit. There are mistakes however. You presumably aren't an English teacher, so you're "forgiven".
Paulina 12 | 2,231
21 Jan 2014 #62
This has commonly been referred to as a "Polish inferiority complex" by the British expats who visit this forum as well as the British-born children of the post-war Polish émigrés to the UK.

Well, I would call it modesty.

Yet these above sentences of yours seem to disclose what may well be called a "superiority complex". Will you please stop patronising other people in this rather annoying way!

I'm sorry, Ziemowit, but it's you who must have a "superiority complex" if you thought that such basic things had to be explained to people here.

Yes, yes, there's a good girl! We all know by now how talented person in languages and pronounciation you are.

What's wrong, Ziemowit? Is it getting on your nerves? :)
Because that's what Wlodzimierz is doing in almost every language thread on this forum. Do you realise that?

You are writing about it in almost every language thread.

Nope, I'm writing about it only in this thread :) And only because Wlodzimierz doubted my ability in discerning whether someone is speaking English with an accent or not and whether I can say if someone is saying "w" or "v" when speaking English lol

So I wanted him to realise that there are other people beside him who maybe have some gift of pronouncing and hearing things right :)

Yes, "obsessing" is a word that you can safely re-address to yourself. And I am not joking here at all !

What am I obsessing over exactly? :D

My style of writing is literate and my words well chosen. Kindly don't project your own mediocre English writing if it doesn't measure up to my level!

lol
That's what I'm talking about :) You seem quite full of yourself.
My English writing will always be "mediocre" in comparisment to that of the native speakers.
However, I can see a difference between your style of writing and of all the native speakers of English on this forum.
For someone it may be "literate with words well chosen", for others it may be pretentious and irritating - I don't really care about that.

All I'm saying is - considering that your writing style isn't typical for many native speakers of English, it's simply unfair on your part to judge the style of non-native speakers of English so harshly and call it "primitive".

Your English actually isn't half bad, I must admit. There are mistakes however. You presumably aren't an English teacher, so you're "forgiven".

Why thank you, kind sir, you're simply too gracious lol

Listen, Wlodzimierz, I think you're an OK person in general, there are worse people than you on this forum lol, I have no grudge against you. It's just that obsession of yours and your attitude is irritating. I think you should, as we say in Poland, "spuścić trochę z tonu" and maybe even people will start talking to you in their native languages ;)
Kocio
21 Jan 2014 #63
Do Poles have a difficult time understanding Americans when they speak English? Specifically, do they think Americans speak too fast?

It depends who's speaking. Especjally I love this Louisianas accent :) I had problem with it.
pawian 181 | 17,079
8 Jul 2020 #64
Do Poles have a difficult time understanding Americans when they speak English?

I think so. That is why, when I want to lift my students` spirits about learning ESL, I recommend or even play for them some videos with British politicians who speak in the Parliament. Or even the Queen herself. My students are thrilled coz they understand almost everything.

youtu.be/rv5t6rC6yvg
Ziemowit 13 | 4,535
8 Jul 2020 #65
I do simply because I am used to listening to Britush English and I am not used to listening to American English. But I love reading books on America and American history!
pawian 181 | 17,079
8 Jul 2020 #66
But I love reading books on America and American history

Me too!



Lenka 3 | 2,811
8 Jul 2020 #67
To me nothing beats nice British English. It's so clear...But then you go to UK, walk the streets and find out that not many people on the streets speak like that....

But I guess it would work in similar way with American English.
johnny reb 31 | 6,323
8 Jul 2020 #68
Try listening to American Black English sometime.
pawian 181 | 17,079
8 Jul 2020 #69
find out that not many people on the streets speak like that....

They didn`t graduate from Tonbridge, Eton, Cambridge, Oxford etc.
dolnoslask 6 | 3,074
8 Jul 2020 #70
Yeah this is a prime example of American lexical abiguuuiiiittttyyys .

"Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo"

Yeah that's right this is a example of American english
Ziemowit 13 | 4,535
8 Jul 2020 #71
Ostatnia walk Dakotów

WOW, books of my youth! But I've never known of that one. I am familiar with this one:

tomek
pawian 181 | 17,079
8 Jul 2020 #72
I read all parts of Tomek Wilmowski series, some of them a few times. This one above was the most boring of all and I read it only once.Szklarski`s Native American saga was much more interesting.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,535
8 Jul 2020 #73
Have you read any of Wiesław Wernic's books on the Wild American West?
pawian 181 | 17,079
8 Jul 2020 #74
Yes, the only one which I found in our home library, sth about Wichita Falls. Not bad, I think I read it twice.
Chemikiem
9 Jul 2020 #75
you go to UK, walk the streets and find out that not many people on the streets speak like that....

Mainly due to regional dialects.

They didn`t graduate from Tonbridge, Eton, Cambridge, Oxford etc.

Neither did I, but I do speak clearly. Poles have said in the past that they can easily understand what I'm saying, but I think that's because I don't have any trace of a dialect. I think anyone who isn't from the UK is going to find it hard work listening to a geordie, mancunian, brummie, for example.
pawian 181 | 17,079
11 Jul 2020 #76
Neither did I,

So, my last chance: St Paul's Girls' School and UCL. hahaha


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