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Americanization of Poland - good or bad?


Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
10 Jun 2018 #1
From:
mtstandard.com/news/opinion/guest-opinion-american-popular-culture-invades-poland/article_5a7b70a7-4dd1-507e-a16a-6a25dd6ad6cb.html

For the school year of 2008-2009, I was awarded a Fulbright scholarship to teach in Poland at the University of Wroclaw. I spent the year with my wife and teenage daughter.

To assuage our occasional homesickness, we saw a lot of American movies, with Polish subtitles, at the huge, ultra- modern mall near our apartment: "Forgetting Sarah Marshall," "The Dark Knight," "Milk" and (alas) "Mamma Mia." The mall's multiplex screened many more American than Polish films. Often afterward, we ate ice cream in the mall's food court, which sports a Subway sandwich shop, a Burger King, and a Kentucky Fried Chicken. Sitting there, you'd have no idea (except for the signs in Polish above the stores) that you weren't in Middle America


As a visitor from the US, I was not amused. For the money I spent, I wanted to see Polish restaurants serving Polish food. The unhealthy type like flaki and tatar. That was not easy to find. But a Subway sandwich? No sweat.
cms neuf - | 1,599
10 Jun 2018 #2
Apart from macs, kfc, bk and starbucks i cannot think of an American retailer that has a serious presence in Poland. None of the food, clothing, sports, DIY or drugstores are American.

Gap, Footlocker and Exxon have been and gone but i cant think of many others.

Almost all malls have polish food available - there are chains like Altana, and Chlopskie jadlo plus pubs and plenty of stoisko selling sausage, cheese etc plus you can often eat at the deli counter in the supermarket which has plenty of kapusta and schab.

Did you really visit here ?
OP Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
10 Jun 2018 #3
From Chicago Tribune:

The extreme formalities and politeness of Polish culture can seem circular to a foreigner, but it is a pleasant opening dance to many, especially older, Poles. Many men still kiss a woman's hand at the beginning and close of a business meeting, a social grace that might well be considered harassment in the U.S.

"We don't use Pan or Pani (Mr. or Miss) in our office but large state-owned companies still do," Tobiasz said. "You have to call the head of the company Pan Dyrektor and you cannot call him by his first name. In Polish companies it will not change in several years. But especially in American companies, you'll find people are open, friendlier and more informal."


I like friendlier and informal.
mafketis 23 | 8,421
10 Jun 2018 #4
From Chicago Tribune

See that's your problem, not being Polish you're relying on third hand information (repeating old stereotypes) that's completely wrong and trying to pass as native. What a silly, old, unconvincing fraud you are (see? no Pan!)
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
10 Jun 2018 #5
Poland's by far the least Americanized nation in Europe! Germany's far more like almost a mini-US, certainly in terms of how American English has infected their mother tongue. French additions were clearly a badge of pride; take from one's betters and imitate them. "Denglisch" or "Germlish" or whatever you wish to call it, is a sign of linguistic laziness, scarcely pride, and probably far more widespread in Germany than, say, "Poglish" is in Poland.
pawian 170 | 11,467
7 Mar 2020 #6
But especially in American companies, you'll find people are open, friendlier and more informal."

Because that`s what people are indoctrinated to act like. Keep smiling and optimistic approach are a must in the US. Sad gloomy guys are considered losers.
gumishu 11 | 5,239
8 Mar 2020 #7
@mafketis

I feel excused because it was not me who revived this thread - but mafketis - do you still believe Rich is not Polish by birth after all this time?
Ziemowit 13 | 4,094
8 Mar 2020 #8
Keep smiling and optimistic approach are a must in the US. Sad gloomy guys are considered losers.

The funny thing is that the Americans reject European PC, but they eagerly comply with the necessity of bearing an artificial smile glued to their mugs all day. And Rich is no exception even if the 'keep snmiling' rule is a pecular kind of political correctness, too.
johnny reb 23 | 4,553
8 Mar 2020 #9
Keep smiling and optimistic approach are a must in the US.

Who would you hire for a job, the cheerful congenial guy or the bummer guy with a frown and negative about everything in life ?

the 'keep snmiling' rule is a pecular kind of political correctness, too.

Maybe for most Polish people but it actually comes natural with grounded happy people.
OP Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
8 Mar 2020 #10
Couldn't say it any better. The proof: kids are naturally prewired to smile when they are happy and see a friendly face, even if that face belongs to an old and strange guy like me. Nobody got them "indoctrinated", coerced, bribed, or threatened to smile - or no ice cream.

As for adults, a simple hand wave as we approach, full eye contact, and a "hi" turns a 30-second random commercial encounter into a moment that pleasant and so much different that those fake and oh so serious faces of the Euro skinny supermodels who must feel that this is how they look more intelligent than they really are.
pawian 170 | 11,467
8 Mar 2020 #11
It depends on the workplace. For a cemetery/morgue position I would choose the other type.

a simple hand wave as we approach, full eye contact, and a "hi" turns a 30-second random commercial encounter into a moment that pleasant

Also with immigrants from behind the southern border?? :):)
OP Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
8 Mar 2020 #12
To add to the gloom...That's the last thing I want to see when I am dead.

Also with immigrants from behind the southern border?? :):)

Them, too.
pawian 170 | 11,467
8 Mar 2020 #13
Guys who support keep smiling approach, think reasonably and logically for a while.

Keep smiling approach in the US produces millions of patients for psychiatrists and counsellors each year. You can never be yourself when among other people - regardless whether aliens, workmates, family. NEVER. You must`nt complain at work coz they will fire you. You mustn`t complain at home coz your wife will divorce you. You mustn`t complain to mates coz they will think you are a loser. Who TF can you complain to at last? The shrink. He or she will take everything from you for decent financial gratification.

ISn`t the Polish approach better? People meet in the street and start complaining immediately. Later they fell happy and don`t need to consult a counsellor. Only really mentally ill guys do.
Miloslaw 7 | 3,264
8 Mar 2020 #14
Maybe for most Polish people but it actually comes natural with grounded happy people

No, it is false and transparent.
"Have a nice day" makes me feel sick...... just being polite is enough, no need to act up.
Life ain't Holywood......
OP Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
8 Mar 2020 #15
"Have a nice day" makes me feel sick..

That's why I never say it. Or "you are welcome".
A nod is plenty good and it means the same.
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
8 Mar 2020 #16
When any country becomes "-ized", the results will usually be less than favorable!

Poles are and always will be Polish, Germans German, the French French and so forth.
Motto here? Ya can't fit a square peg into a round hole.....it won't work:-)

Superficially of course, English, in the future most likely, American English, will be used exclusively in nearly every country in the customer service sector, bar none.

This doesn't mean though that a foreigner's knowledge of the whatever local lingo won't still be tremendously helpful, albeit no longer absolutely necessary for basic every day transactions.
OP Rich Mazur 4 | 3,752
8 Mar 2020 #17
Poles are and always will be Polish, Ya can't fit a square peg into a round hole.....it won't work:-)

Yes, you can and it will fit just fine. That mall is in Radom. Radom is in Poland.
While in Poland, stopped asking if they speak English on day two.



Lyzko 25 | 7,139
8 Mar 2020 #18
Says you!
I know better in this case, based on what I hear from my students.
After all, they live there 24/7 and have no need to either impress of suck up to me. They're expressing their honest opinions, I presume.
Miloslaw 7 | 3,264
8 Mar 2020 #19
A nod is plenty good and it means the same

Yup.
Joker 1 | 1,594
9 Mar 2020 #20
what I hear from my students.

Then you woke up.........
jon357 63 | 15,214
9 Mar 2020 #21
English

Poland isn't Americanised; Poles don't learn English so they can speak to Americans; most have probably never met one.
mafketis 23 | 8,421
9 Mar 2020 #22
Poles don't learn English so they can speak to Americans

Very true, similarly they don't learn it so they can speak to people from the British Isles... they mostly learn it because it's mostly a required subject at school (and language learning has always had a prominent place in the Polish school system).
jon357 63 | 15,214
9 Mar 2020 #23
similarly they don't learn it so they can speak to people from the British Isles

Indeed; People here are more likely to use it to speak to people from nearby countries etc.
johnny reb 23 | 4,553
9 Mar 2020 #24
Americans don't learn Spanish to talk to people in Poland, they learn it to talk to people in near by countries.
jon357 63 | 15,214
9 Mar 2020 #25
Americans don't learn Spanish to talk to people in Poland,

Good, since not many speak it here.
johnny reb 23 | 4,553
9 Mar 2020 #26
Even better, many speak it here.
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
9 Mar 2020 #27
But conversely not much Polish except among the larger Polish-American communities
such as Chicago, Greenpoint, Bklyn. and others:-)
Joker 1 | 1,594
9 Mar 2020 #28
larger Polish-American communities
such as Chicago,

The geographical area of the Chicago/Polish community has changed drastically over the years, its much smaller now. Many Poles have left the city for the suburbs. Ja Tez:)
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
9 Mar 2020 #29
Same in Greenpoint!
Was there nearly a year ago and apparently many if not most of those wonderful cafes and shops are now gone, little Polish left, except for Polonia Bookstore(:-
pawian 170 | 11,467
9 Mar 2020 #30
When in Greenpoint, I took a photo of a deserted factory. Is it still there? And anothert one in Manhattan, too.







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