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Which is the best city in Poland to open a kebab shop?


BreakingBad 1 | 6
8 Oct 2013  #1
Hi, all. I hope you are having a good time.

I need your precious idea about opening a kebap shop in Poland. What is the best city in Poland to do that? I do not think to do that in the big cities or the ones who has already many of them. In my mind, i have Wroclaw or Katowice. It will be small investment and i will not sell so expensive, basicly a place or town based on students and yound people with not so many kebap shop.

The selling prices of the kebap will be around 7-10 Zloty. The most important, of course location and a place to rent for shop in a good area for the business.

Do you think around how much do it cost to rent such a place?

I am looking forward to your ideas and thoughts.

Thank you in advance.

Btw It will be really Turkish kebap running by Turkish..
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Oct 2013  #2
Nowhere, really. That market is over-saturated just about everywhere in the country. In fact, a lot of the kebab shops in Wrocław have closed down recently because they couldn't survive in such a highly competitive market, and I'm sure it's the same everywhere else in the country, espceially in any mid-sixed or large city. The same for a sit-down Turkish restaurant that we used to have in Wrocław, even though the food was really good. It shut down two years ago.

Gastronomy is generally a very bad area for foreigners to invest in, unless the have 1) plenty of startup capital and enough savings to last the three, four or five years before the establishment finally turns a profit; 2) extensive formal education and street smarts in gastronomic business; 3) extensive practical experience in the field, especially with management; 4) fluency in the local language and intimate knowledge of the local market; 5) a very realistic, even somewhat pessimistic, approach to the prospects of the business; and 6) a willingness, even eagerness, to spend every waking hour working your butt off day after day after day for years on end. A local partner who fulfills the same requirements helps enormously, or multiple family members who can work, essentially, for free.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but there is little chance that you will be able to make any money by opening a kebab stand anywhere in Poland. You might have had a chance ten, fifteen years ago, but not anymore.
OP BreakingBad 1 | 6
8 Oct 2013  #3
Thank you very much for detailed information and explanation. Well, i studied in Bialystok, last year, there is one good Turkish kebap in the city center and they were doing really great, thought it would be good idea, but i respect your idead, you are the local one, your observations could be better than mine, of course..Well i am on the hotel business in Turkey,Istanbul, I am just looking for a easy and not so expensive investmenst with not so much risk (of course, there is always)...Do you have any idea to make a business around 50,000 PLN?

Thanks again for your reply back.
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Oct 2013  #4
I am just looking for a easy and not so expensive investmenst with not so much risk

Well, gastronomy is pretty much out, as it is definitely NOT eay, requires a YERY LARGE investment that will not pay off for years, and is VERY high risk. Retail and the hotel business are pretty much out of the picture for the same reasons. Furthermore, 50,000 PLN is far too little capital for a kebab stand, or a hotel or retail outlet.

Your best bet is to invest in your own hotel, or to partner with someone who already has a sucessful business in Turkey.

Sorry, and no offense intended, but from what you've said here, I doubt that you would be able to run a successful business in the EU. A lot of your ideas are too divorced from reality.

Actually, the best investment you can make is to get some solid training in accounting, finance, management and administration, get hired by or partner with someone who already has a sucessful business, and branch out when you have accumulated a significant amount of capital and on-the-job experience. If you're hell bent on doing business in Poland, learn the local language to a very high level of proficiency. We're talking in about ten years or so.
Nile 1 | 155
8 Oct 2013  #5
Kebab is a very unhealthy food. One contains 140g of fat and is high in trans fat, which raises cholesterol levels. Also instead of the hand-carved rotating roast kebab shops across Europe are using minced-up cuts of indeterminate meat swimming in grease. No better that an average fast food grub.
TheOther 5 | 3,771
8 Oct 2013  #6
One contains 140g of fat and is high in trans fat

I never heard of trans fats in kebabs, but this one was really an eye-opener:

theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2008/may/15/healthandwellbeing.foodanddrink

Quote:
"Nutritionists said eating two a week could cause a heart attack within 10 years."
Nightglade 7 | 97
8 Oct 2013  #7
Slightly OT, but we had a kebab stall here in Poznań by the music theatre. They made the most amazing kebabs, they were very cheap and the guy inside was always good fun (he spoke English, too). Sadly they vanished some time ago :(
Trevek 26 | 1,702
8 Oct 2013  #8
There are several kebab shops in Olsztyn. A couple of years ago, we had a lot of saudi students here and one near the school was run by an Egyptian. It was the only halal meat in town. The guy made a fortune and started selling Arabic goods too. Arabs are thin on the ground now, but he still makes great kebabs.
blinkie - | 4
13 Oct 2013  #9
Opening a kebab shop in big city is bad idea. I have been in Wroclaw and I have seen a lot of kebab shops. I live in small city nearby Germany and we have 2 kebab shop - the first one is in a center of city, the second is in suburbia. I don't know a lot about the second one, but the first has a lot of clients. It's placed next to popular market and thank to it shop has more clients, I suppose :) Maybe kebab is some kind of fastfood, but fastfood is very popular among ordinary people.

I think the best city to open that kind of shop will be neither too small, nor too big city. Cities nearby polish mountains, for example Szklarska Poręba, are good. These are touristic cities, they are medium-sized, but there's always crowds of people.

And kebab for 7-10 zlotych? It isn't too... cheap? In Wroclaw kebab costs more than 13 zlotych. In my city doner kebab (my favourite) costs 14-15.
ZIMMY 6 | 1,601
13 Oct 2013  #10
"Which is the best city in Poland to open a kebab shop? "

Well, Walter White, try Lódz, that's where I'm opening up a Mexican restaurant.
OP BreakingBad 1 | 6
13 Oct 2013  #11
Thanks for your reply and comment, Zimmy...Congragulations..I hope you will do well..Are you Mexican? I will need some help about it, how to open, find a place, formal regulations..I would like to contact you personally if it is OK for you, My e-mail is: wiskyes@hotmail

Really i appreciate if you help me and give me some information about it.

Thanks...
jon357 63 | 14,124
20 Sep 2014  #12
try Lódz

Not much money there - and as I remember a ton of competition. Warsaw is a better bet though the real estate prices are higher. It's a trade-off really. You'll get a lower margin but probably sell more. Be careful though, a chain called Kebab King are opening large shops round town.

The most important, of course location and a place to rent for shop in a good area for the business.

And also without people living upstairs - the smell from those places can be nauseating. Enough to drive someone to drink
Prosactony
27 Dec 2015  #13
Is buying a kebab shop in residential area in gdansk for 65000 zloty worth?
Sparks11 - | 335
27 Dec 2015  #14
I can't think of many kebab shops that have closed in Warsaw in the many years that I've been here. I think that anywhere near the train station is a good location.
Wulkan - | 3,251
27 Dec 2015  #15
Is buying a kebab shop in residential area in gdansk for 65000 zloty worth?

I don't think so.
shawon 2 | 20
27 Dec 2015  #16
Hello, I would like to have a quick market idea. Is it a good idea to open an Indian style restaurant in Zakopane ( in Krupwoki street)?
Wulkan - | 3,251
27 Dec 2015  #17
With the halal meat served? sure
Atrom - | 6
28 Dec 2015  #18
That was a cheap shot! Really.
Harry
28 Dec 2015  #19
Is buying a kebab shop in residential area in gdansk for 65000 zloty worth?

Depends what that money buys you. How long is the lease for and how far below the market rate is it? How long has the business been there? How well know is the brand? How much is their annual, monthly and weekly revenue? What's the profit margin? How much do you know about the business?

With the halal meat served? sure

Yet again you're showing your ignorance of Polish reality. Places here which offer halal meat do better than places which don't. There's a very successful kebab place almost next door to my local multi-tap which offers halal meat. I had a quick chat with the owner when I popped in the other week with a mate who wanted a kebab, the owner said that they don't sell much halal meat and during the week they only cook it to order but they do get people coming in who don't want halal meat but go to that place because they know that a place which takes the trouble to offer halal meat is going to get the little things right too.
Crow 137 | 7,632
28 Dec 2015  #20
Btw It will be really Turkish kebap running by Turkish..

why would Poles expose itself to Turkish cook and to food that originally even isn`t Turkish? If Poles want oriental version of it is Persian kebab. But, if Poles want original version of the dish, they should taste Slaveno-Serbian cevap. Turkish kebab is nothing but mixture of two influences on Turks, Persian and Serbian.

This thread is absurd. Turkish cook.. to put cross on myself. Where goes this world

Ćevapi
wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%86evapi#Name_and_etymology

Ćevapi has its origins in the Balkans and represents a regional speciality similar to the kofte kebab. ........... The word ćevap comes from the Serbian word `cev` which means tube in English. It sound similar to kebab in Persian, sometimes with the South Slavic diminutive ending -èići (Bosnian, Croatian: ćevapèići/ćevapi; Slovene: èevapèièi/èevapi; Serbian: ћевапчићи/ћевапи, ćevapèići/ćevapi; Macedonian: Ќебапи, kjebapi; Bulgarian: Кебапчета, kebapcheta, Czech: èevabèièi). The word ćevapi is plural; the singular form ćevap is rarely used, as a typical serving consists of several ćevapi.

Levi 12 | 450
28 Dec 2015  #21
Places here which offer halal meat do better than places which don't.

No, they don't. This is just your wishful thinking again.

Kebab stores close almost everyday, everywhere, for lack of customers. Even with you and Jon here trying to proselytize and convert people, Poland have only few hundred practicing muslims like you both. So no, Halal is not the a big market. Is not even a market actually.

Differently than muslim majority cities like Paris or Stockholm.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,653
28 Dec 2015  #22
No, they don't. This is just your wishful thinking again.

Given that Harry has lived in Poland for a very long time and you have...never, I suspect he knows more about what works in Poland than you do.

Kebab stores close almost everyday, everywhere, for lack of customers.

More and more open up everywhere, too. Every shopping centre has an outlet selling kebabs, Turkish food is growing in popularity, etc etc.

Even with you and Jon here trying to proselytize and convert people, Poland have only few hundred practicing muslims like you both.

You can't stop the Turkish Agenda.
Crow 137 | 7,632
28 Dec 2015  #23
No, they don't. This is just your wishful thinking again.

ah that Harry, eternal Muslim protagonist here. Poland isn`t England. Poles are for peaceful coexistence, while English took it all wrong- they subjugate themselves even when nobody ask them to subjugate. Very nasty mentality

Every shopping centre has an outlet selling kebabs, Turkish food is growing in popularity, etc etc.

disguising.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
28 Dec 2015  #24
Levi: why do you keep saying things that are not true? I am 100% sure you have never lived in Stockholm or in Paris otherwise you would know reality. Anyway unfortunately Poles love (greasy and stinky) kebabs.
dolnoslask
28 Dec 2015  #25
Kebabs in Poland are horrid, they don't use lamb for a start, god knows whats in them.

If anyone knows of (or is opening up) a kebab shop that sells proper kebabs (Lamb) in lower Silesia please let me know.

Hi crow hope you had a nice Christmas, I think that I will give the Albanian kebabs a miss, but I am happy to share popcorn with you anytime.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,665
28 Dec 2015  #26
Anyway proper grilled Turkish shish kebabs are not 'nasty and greasy' at all. With a pitta and some salad, they are in fact quite a healthy option.

Now doner on the other hand....hmmm well...
I remember seeing shawarma / 'giros' type places in Poland years ago. It is not that new is it?
dolnoslask
28 Dec 2015  #27
Roz stop it " proper grilled Turkish shish kebabs" yum yum , Ryanair have already made enough money out of me importing this sort of naughtiness.
Crow 137 | 7,632
28 Dec 2015  #28
people, best cevapcici are of mixed meat- beef, lamb and pork. Now, considering that Turks don`t eat pork, they degraded original Serbian recipe. To them it was similar as Persian kebab and they named it that way (but kebab is different recipe, plus kebab is bigger then cevap). i suppose in original kebab they put camel meat

Hi crow hope you had a nice Christmas, I think that I will give the Albanian kebabs a miss, but I am happy to share popcorn with you anytime.

dobri pane brate, marry Christmas to you. i would have one in January but i am among those who pray that we celebrate it twice

Plus, i would drink one for Svetovid

have you been on the rakija Crowie?

good one

Dunja (quince)
Harry
28 Dec 2015  #29
Now, considering that Turks don`t eat pork, they degraded original Serbian recipe.

Please shut up about Serbia; nobody in Poland cares. People here know that kebabs are originally Turkish (and some can tell you that the word is Persian). It's interesting how successful Turkish restaurants here are, there are places serving Turkish food in pretty much every town of upwards of a couple of dozen thousand inhabitants, but Serbia food is very unpopular here - I can only think of three Serbian restaurants in Warsaw ever, one of which was turned into a Polish restaurant and another became a British pub, with the third still open. But since Croatia joined the EU at least four Croatian restaurants have opened in Warsaw, one of which is staff so talented that they can even serve Tyskie that is drinkable!
dolnoslask
28 Dec 2015  #30
I hope no halal kebabs are sold in Poland , a percentage of the Zakat that is paid has to go towards Jihad via the muslim brotherhood. so no halal kebabs for me.

Don't worry crow polish people care about Serbia and our Slavic brothers. those who do not understand this relationship should google it.


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