The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered [10]  |  Archives [1] 
 
User: Guest

Language  100% width205 posts«« 1 - page 2 of 7

Polish words that sound funny?


Sidliste_Chodov 1 | 442    
7 Nov 2011  #31
The Polish for Breasts and First sound almost the same,one little letter difference :)

I was in Manchester city centre recently, and I saw a company called "Cheeper Van Hire", and it sounds like it could mean "P*ssy Van Hire" if you say it a certain way, lol.

Back in the early 2000s, there used to be a club here in south London, started by a few people I used to know from the rave scene, and they used to drive around in a van with the name of the club - "Huje" (pronounced "Huge", of course). Someone else Polish beat me to it, but they soon found out how we would say it, and what that means :D

I always wonder what a pork dog is when I walk past a shop's refrigerated section and see "Pork Pies" haha.
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
7 Nov 2011  #32
For some reason when I pronounced the word Winp

if you pronounce 'wino' the English way it sounds like Polish 'łajno' which is animal's turd in Polish or simply crap
petegru3    
23 Jul 2012  #33
pipa......means female's private part in my neck of woods
fluteboy - | 8    
20 Aug 2012  #34
While in the frozen aisle of the supermarket, I noticed the sign on the freezer that said "Pies". It then made me wonder whether Polish shoppers read it differently....

flickr.com/photos/30930515@N07/7331236094

Frozen dog? Whatever next!
fluteboy - | 8    
20 Aug 2012  #36
From the Heyah calendar - strangely appropriate!
PennBoy 77 | 2,440    
21 Feb 2013  #37
Polish words that sound funny?

One one I hear Poles, here in America use, is leser. I thought it's just people who misheard the English word loser, as in a person, and keep pronouncing it wrong. Is it also used in Poland nowadays??
Ironside 47 | 9,250    
21 Feb 2013  #38
Is it also used in Poland nowadays??

how old were you when you left Poland?
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurycy_Maksymilian_Leser
no just kidding:
miejski.pl/slowo-Leser
Peter-KRK    
21 Feb 2013  #39
sign on the freezer that said "Pies"

Yet it is clear: Tam jest pies pochowany.
Suwka - | 21    
22 Feb 2013  #40
sign on the freezer that said "Pies"Yet it is clear: Tam jest pies pochowany.

pogrzebany. Its fro german: da liegt der Hund begraben. And the name of tthis dog was Stutzel [pron. Stoochel]
Rysavy 10 | 308    
22 Feb 2013  #41
My bestest friend (now fiance) told me if/when I visit; NOT to exclaim my foodie love for ice cream using Polish same way, specially in tone.

I guess there is a metaphor of an action best kept between us? : p unless I charge by the minute? XD

edit .. maybe I can use alternate words to gush over my love for forbidden dairy..lol
ollie 3 | 4    
22 Feb 2013  #42
When I went to a Polish evening class, there were a few smiles when we started looking at the verb być ;-)
Bejma    
12 Feb 2017  #43
Panna, fontanna. The rolled "n" sound. Always amused me.
Bejma    
12 Feb 2017  #44
My friend had a friend they called "sheik." I always warned them not to use that nickname in front of my parents.
Bejma    
12 Feb 2017  #45
By the way, speaking of those rolled "n's" I recall a song my grandfather and dad used to sing. Something like this: "Zaskim ogrodzie, koło fontanna, przysiadł się facet, u młodej panny....and, it ends up ...a ona mu zegarek." Anybody know the entire song? (he stole a kiss, and she stole his watch is what it supposedly meant). My grandfather used to make up additional stanzas to the song. My grandmother once hit him over the head with a wooden spoon while he was doing so. ???
Wulkan - | 3,280    
12 Feb 2017  #46
My friend had a friend they called "sheik." I always warned them not to use that

What's wrong with "sheik"?

Stick to the Polish words please
Username123    
13 Feb 2017  #47
I agree with the first poster, chciałbym sounds funny. Also byłbym, and I guess most words in which ł is in the middle or at the end of a word, for some reason.

In my language, when something unexpected happens like someone almost walks into you on the street, we usually say 'hui'. It's like an exclamation between 'oh' and 'yikes' so it's really hard to control.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,100    
13 Feb 2017  #48
'Sheik' is a Polish word, too, although it is spelled "szejk".
cinek 2 | 334    
13 Feb 2017  #49
Zaskim ogrodzie, koło fontanna

W Saskim Ogrodzie, koło fontanny..."

Anybody know the entire song

Stanisław Grzesiuk:

youtu.be/D5s0Q_XlmhM
Ziemowit 12 | 3,100    
13 Feb 2017  #50
W Saskim ogrodzie koło fontanny
Jakiś się frajer przysiadł do panny
Była niewinna jak wonna lilia
Na imię miała panna Cecylia
Tak z nią flirtował aż przebrał miarę
Skradł jej całusa, ona mu zegarek

This song was popular in the 1860s and the text referred to an authentic fact that happened in the year 1861. Originally it was:

Na Starym Mieście przy wodotrysku
Pułkownik Trepow dostał po pysku
ChetK    
3 Jul 2018  #51
Does anybody know who Alexander Graham Bellski was?

He was the first TELEPHONE POLE.
Crow 146 | 7,594    
4 Jul 2018  #52
kurwa is funny word to me. I love it. Poles have `w` in it. We Serbs have `v`. So kurwa is kind of kurva on the double. Poles are lucky.
Sylvio 12 | 83    
4 Jul 2018  #53
Most Brits find polish words for elephant or seal funny. Used to work north of Vauxhall, near Pimlico..Poles found the name hilarious cause pi mliko in polish is what an old granny would say to a child to finish his drink.

About the k...word, i disagree. Far from funny its a disgusting word, and only retards spice their talk with it. Unlike Brits Poles neither want or know how to swear in order to amuse anyone. Where in UK you would hear words like dick-head, pillock, nutcase, headcase, wollie, arsehole, and k's more, here its always the uninnovative k- this and k- that.
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,237    
4 Jul 2018  #54
kutafon, szmaciarz, zdzira, głąb, padalec , lodziara, małokutasiński

I am so happy to have no clue what these verbal tumors mean.

here its always the uninnovative k- this and k- that.

You are so right. When I am close to a couple of Polish guys talking, the only thing that comes across loud and clear is kurwa. The rest is typically incomprehensible garbage only gorale could figure out, since so many Poles make it a point to always sound like wiseguys minus the Italian-NY charm. In some sentences, two or three. The supply seems unlimited.
mafketis 16 | 6,285    
5 Jul 2018  #55
I am so happy to have no clue what these verbal tumors mean

Well you're not Polish so.... duh you don't understand ordinary (if unpleasant) words.

loud and clear is kurwa. The rest is typically incomprehensible

You're not Polish, you haven't studied the language, you don't understand it. It's all very obvious...
NoToForeigners 6 | 986    
5 Jul 2018  #56
You're not Polish, you haven't studied the language, you don't understand it. It's all very obvious...

Yup. Just like an ape. Can't understand the language but can memorise few words.
Rich Mazur 5 | 2,237    
5 Jul 2018  #57
You're not Polish, you haven't studied the language, you don't understand it. It's all very obvious...

You are soooo totally right. The first thing they told me here in 1967 was how to pretend being Polish in case I end up needing this skill in 2018 while posting at Polishforums.com. So, the FBI sent me this little gem of Polish literary achievement. That's a story about krolewnie pizdalonie i kondonie samojebie. They also told me that this is never going to be posted on the Internet and, therefore, will serve me well as a proof of my Polish ethnicity. They also mentioned something about Telimena poem and its x-rated vertion. Before I left the office, I was reminded to quote 'sklepy za zoltymi firankami', and was handed a fake diploma. Later, they sent me a US passport which says that I was born in Warsaw, Poland. F****** liars! They really did a number on me, don't you think?
Lyzko 18 | 5,285    
5 Jul 2018  #59
Well, perhaps not Polish words exactly, at least any I can come up with. However, your current president's family name did in fact cause my risible muscles into strenuous action the first time I encountered it:

"Camptown Races sing this song.....DUDA, DUDA"
LOL
Crow 146 | 7,594    
6 Jul 2018  #60
DUDA sounds fanny in Serbian. It mean `tit` and pl. is `tits`.

So you now understand why I don`t trust to president Duda.



Home / Language / Polish words that sound funny?
Bold Italic [quote]

 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary and unique username or login and post as a member.