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Foreigners speaking Polish - examples.


strzyga 2 | 993
24 Sep 2012 #31
also speaking good polish may make him seem even more mentally deranged

It's no more deranged than my "duplo kavi" (I don't even know how to write it properly) when ordering coffee in Hungary :)

I think you worry too much. If the customer seems nice, a longer conversation is likely to issue, in whatever language. But if he looks like a nutcase, no amount of Polish is going to help him :)
pam
24 Sep 2012 #32
Is it ok to speak polish very badly to someone in Poland even if the other person speaks reasonable english?

Blimey! There's hope for me yet! Don't think i've ever heard Polish spoken so badly!
Having said that Catsoldier, people learn by making mistakes as i'm sure you know.
Even when my Polish was much worse than it is now, i still spoke Polish to people in shops when i was in Poland.
Unless you are fortunate enough to be able to speak Polish on a regular basis, when else are you going to get the chance to practice it?

I've made a fair few howlers speaking it abroad in the past, and probably did make a fool of myself, but by and large most Poles were laughing with me, not at me!

Most will respect you for at least making the effort!
Piorun - | 658
24 Sep 2012 #33
The only way to do this correctly is to have a laugh with the two behind the counter otherwise he can't but appear silly

Cool, at the end of the video the expression on his face is priceless. He's so proud of himself a genuine sense of accomplishment.

In my opinion the only way to this correctly is to try, no matter how badly you might sound to others. When the girl behind the counter tried speaking english he didn't even flinch but insisted on the conversation to be carried on in polish, more power to him. The only way to learn is to practice what you have learned thus far, nothing wrong with that, I think he did OK. I'm sure the shop attendants found this situation a bit amusing afterwards and might have cracked a few jokes after he left the shop, but he did catch them off guard.

Even the Old Blue Eyes himself sang in Polish, at the end of this clip you'll hear him having a go at Polish.

youtu.be/fqBT9PO8T4Q
Kamila Polish - | 6
24 Sep 2012 #34
Foreign students learning in Poland about the Polish language. Sarah and Gudrun are learning Polish. Listen to them speaking about their motivation:
Tim Bucknall 7 | 98
8 Dec 2012 #35
you need to hear some of the Polish Language programmes on China Radio International!
i thought i'd discovered a new language!

i listened to their Czech service for 10 minutes once before i could figure out what language it was supposed to be!

it is a hard Language to learn compared to Czech, Portugese is almost as hard.
theres actually a lot of similar sounds in Portugese & Polish that i have trouble with
Wulkan - | 3,203
9 Dec 2012 #36
you need to hear some of the Polish Language programmes on China Radio International!

any link?
Tim Bucknall 7 | 98
11 Dec 2012 #37
sorry i can't find the webstream. but 963am (if you don't live near a Twoje Radio transmitter) or anywhere between 7200 & 7400 short wave in the evenings
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
18 Dec 2012 #38
any link?

The site is here: polish.cri.cn/index.htm

but seems to be based on texts mainly.

I tried to open some audio or video, to no avail.
Malopolanin 3 | 133
4 Jul 2015 #39
2 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=sBIXdeugu6k

4 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=k5j-COrYibE

4 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=LelfOcEVCkc

4 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=vKLGR5X5W3Y

4 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=zomgZ_dRIXw

6 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=nyNS9lFK388

7 and 8 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=44mYc_ZShc0

11 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=zdJyCb6mj_0

12 years in Poland:

youtube.com/watch?v=b1oAJlvEUWk
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
18 Mar 2023 #40
A British historian who settled in Poland decades ago and specializes in Polish history, Mr Professor Norman Davies, speaks Polish.



Comments:

I have been waiting for such a meeting for a very long time. A beautiful moment. I admire Mr. Norman Davis for his commitment to Polish affairs, for his excellent Polish language, for everything he wrote, for modesty. A great man. .

The teaching of the wise is a fountain of life to escape the snare of death.

Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
18 Mar 2023 #41
A great man

Fully agree!
He has written the best books on Polish history and has a better understanding of Poles
And Poland than the idiot Adam Zamoyski.
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
28 Mar 2024 #42
Mamed Chalidow, originally a Chechen boxer and martial art fighter, came to Poland in 1997 as a 17 yo. He learnt Polish, married a Poless and settled in northern city of Olsztyn for decades. Became a Polish citizen in 2010.

Very good Polish, I heard only one vocabulary dissosance. And a slight alien accent.


Lyzko 45 | 9,391
28 Mar 2024 #43
A native Polish speaker friend of mine once told me that in his experience,
foreigners such as myself nearly always trip themselves up in their pronunciation
of consonant clusters! Dipthongs were rarely an issues, but consonants such as
"rz-" "brz" etc. usually got the better of us, first to admit it.

During my initial phone conversation with the above gentleman, he confessed that
he was almost fooled into thinking I was Polish.......except when he heard my consonant
clusters, By then, the jig was up LOL
Lenka 5 | 3,442
28 Mar 2024 #44
I would say that the mispronunciation of the si, sz sound is even bigger give away
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
28 Mar 2024 #45
Those affricates are a challenge, that's for sure. You're right there, Lenka.
I'm talking here though solely about pronunciation as dead give away that the
interlocutor's a foreigner. Forget about vocabulary or syntax, punning and other
types of verbal humor:-)
Lenka 5 | 3,442
28 Mar 2024 #46
I'm talking here though solely about pronunciation as dead give away that the
interlocutor's a foreigner.

Same here. Foreigners usually make a sound somewhere in between those two for both.
jon357 74 | 21,980
28 Mar 2024 #47
mispronunciation of the si, sz sound is

Yes, very much. Ci, cz as well.

rz-" "brz"

I never had a problem with that. As a native English it wasn't new to me since the rz sound of course exists in English as does szcz.
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
29 Mar 2024 #48
That's actually a good point, jon. Perhaps too, the fact that your native tongue
is British and mine is American definitely influences how we pronounce words
in our own language and how "English" pronounces sound such as the "or-" in
"wORd", for example, is quite different from how we say the same sound in
the US variety!:-)

We have many more schwa-type sounds in American English and probably
it's therefore a tad easier for a native Brit such as yourself to learn to pronounce
Polish than for a native-born American English speaker like me, don't you think?
jon357 74 | 21,980
29 Mar 2024 #49
definitely influences how we pronounce words

For sure. With the rz sound, it's as near as damn it the same as the /ʒ/ in pleasure.

wORd

I'd pronounce it /wɜːd/, as in nurse or bird.

We have many more schwa-type sounds in American English

Thinking about it, isn't the opposite more true? Or am I just thinking of endings, since in English English, pleasure, teacher, dollar, visitor, colour, all end in schwa.
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
29 Mar 2024 #50
Well, take for instance the English word "ugly". From my perception, I hear this word
pronounced in "Standard British" aka "RP" (Received Pronunciation) as roughly "Ahgluy"
vs. "Standard American". Polish, as with many European languages, has no phonetic equivalent
to the American short "u-sound".

Conversely for this reason, Poles probably can pronounce British far more easily than
American English, along with the other obvious reason of sheer language exposure to the UK
rather than the US.
jon357 74 | 21,980
29 Mar 2024 #51
Between Polish and English there are similar things. Almost no Pole can get /ɔː/ or /ɜː/ anything like right and many struggle with /ŋ/ despite it being very close to ę.

Standard British"

There's no 'standard British' as such, and the term "Standard English" tends to refer to British/Aus/NZ grammar usage and spelling.

Your example of ugly would work better without the h; it's a short and clipped vowel in RP. I would use the same vowel as in wood.

Poles probably can pronounce British far more easily than
American English

Largely yes, however it's worth remembering that the two languages emerged and for most of their history evolved only a few hundred miles apart.
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
30 Mar 2024 #52
So true, jon!
Sorry, I meant before "Standard English", as of course there are Irish, Scottish, and Welsh varieties of "English" pronunciation:-)

Your analogy of "ugly" with "wood" suggests that your native pronunciation/accent is from the Liverpool area, e.g. "Luv,
*** over to the pub!" as opposed to that snooty-sounding, upper class, posh accent, am I more or less correct?
jon357 74 | 21,980
30 Mar 2024 #53
"Standard English",

That's a grammar term to describe the way English is used in most of the world.

About pronunciation, there's RP however nowadays people tend to refer to modified RP.

your native pronunciation/accent is from the Liverpool area

Not that region; Lerpool has a distinct catch to the vowel sound in those words, largely through influence from Ireland and Wales.

In most of the U.K. (including RP speakers) the vowel sound in pub and ugly are the same.
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
30 Mar 2024 #54
Thanks for straightening me out, jon!
I sent you a private message about "sie" and sometimes
Polish native speakers can't understand me when I say it.
Since I don't want to take a chance with English, on occasion,
I've actually end up writing it down and then they understand LOL
Korvinus 2 | 476
31 Mar 2024 #55
How Brit speaking Polish sounds to Poles. The second part of the announcement.


Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
31 Mar 2024 #56
@Korvinus

HaHaHa! But American Poles sound even worse!
Joker 3 | 2,319
31 Mar 2024 #57
The Polish girls think we sound cute
Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
31 Mar 2024 #58
And you took full advantage of that...... LOL!!!!
Lyzko 45 | 9,391
1 Apr 2024 #59
@Joker, it's probably because they least expect it, especially from an American:-)
Joker 3 | 2,319
1 Apr 2024 #60
it's probably because they least expect it, especially from an American:-

That sounds about right. They usually were surprised and smiling, especially when you mispronounce words.

And you took full advantage of that...... LOL!!!!

I havent been to the Polish bars in years!

There are hot Polish girls all over Chicago. The best place to go is the supermarket for milfs..lol


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