The BEST Guide to POLAND
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Posts by clunkshift  

Joined: 6 Feb 2007 / Male ♂
Last Post: 10 Apr 2008
Threads: Total: 2 / Live: 0 / Archived: 2
Posts: Total: 82 / Live: 9 / Archived: 73
From: Hampshire, England
Interests: Motorcycles, Christian, travel

Displayed posts: 9
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clunkshift   
4 Dec 2007
Off-Topic / Are Polish Christians here? [43]

Does it make a difference for you?

Not peronally, No.
My brother is a regular visitor to Moldova, so I simply speak of what interests me.
clunkshift   
4 Dec 2007
Off-Topic / Are Polish Christians here? [43]

I suspect that seeking Polish Christian evangelical or fundamentalist believers on this forum will be a fruitless effort.

The rough statistics are that during the papacy of JP2 and under communist rule, about 97% of Poles claimed membership of the Catholic Church.

Historically, the main protestant church from 16th century was Kościół Ewangelicko-Reformowany w RP, which now numbers about 1500 members in 8 churches.

Attendance in the Catholic Church since 1989 has been decreasing, possibly by as much as 25%.
Poland's evangelical population has grown slightly, but is still very small; about 40,000 professing evangelical believers among a population of approximately 38 million. Denominations like the Brethren Assemblies, the Baptist Union, the Pentecostal Church, and the Evangelical Free Church are viewed by most Poles as sects.

Of these, I can only speak of my own interest.
There are 39 brethren assemblies in Poland and around 28 groups meeting in homes. For cultural comparison, there are 871 assemblies in Romania - which was never a Catholic cntrolled country.

nowysacz.kwch.pl
wroclaw.kwch.pl
palowice.kwch.pl
kwch.pl
clunkshift   
4 Oct 2007
News / What the Polish government do to bring back home Polish immigrants? [116]

There is a non-government initiative: “Zostańcie z nami” (Stay with Us), organised by a weekly magazine foundation - Polityka (Fundacja Tygodnika Polityka).
The intention is to provide incentive/bursary/grant awards to attract the brightest job candidates and it is sponsored by major companies that need skilled/educated staff.

I wouldn't know if it works though...
clunkshift   
31 Jul 2007
Travel / Collection of dress codes in Poland - what to wear? [86]

Dress code when visiting Roman Catholic, Orthodox or Formal churches

The biblical principle is that flesh should be covered, that is why priests, monks and nuns cover as much up as possible. This is also why devout women wear head coverings or hats, to cover their beautiful hair so as not to draw attention to themselves.

In these surroundings, short skirts, shorts, bare arms, bare shoulders, cleavage etc scream out Look at Me! And show a great disrespect to the feelings and beliefs of the worshippers, just like strolling through a mosque in a swimsuit and eating a pork pie.

There is often no law governing these things, but it reflects badly on you and determines the type of reception that you can expect if you want something from them - like a photo or directions to some other place.

And yes, you could be barred from entering a church for any reason, as they are not public rights of way.
clunkshift   
3 Jul 2007
Food / Types of CHEESE in Poland [150]

Marek, I sense desperation in your question but don't worry, we Brits dont just deep fry brie (don't cry, it dies very quickly), but we do value Camembert, Boursin etc with a nice Merlot. It isn't better or worse than Strong Ale and Wensleydale or Piwo and Oscypek - each are excellent in their own time and place.

Our town has regular French market days and I do buy French country cheeses and wines.
Usually local cheese is best wherever you happen to be, because it is fresh or fresh from correct storage.
When In Korea I was amazed to find that many Hotels only stock (very expensive) French wine - when they are so much closer to Australia!
clunkshift   
30 May 2007
Food / Types of CHEESE in Poland [150]

Oscypek is also fantastic...only if purchased in the Tatry region.

A note for holidaymakers to southern Poland, visit Zakopane on your last full day before coming home; then you can visit the market and slowly wander round all the cheese stalls, eating free samples of the different flavours at each one, and then buy some choice cheeses to bring home.

The different types of country cheeses - goat or sheep, smoked and unsmoked, eaten with wine, port, and beer, (depending on the flavour of the cheese) are wonderful.
clunkshift   
24 Apr 2007
Life / Prices of cars in Poland? [88]

Because of global manufacture, New Car prices are similar throughout Europe - only national taxes and import duties vary.

Used Cars are very different, they are cheaper in countries where emission laws are tightest - especially Germany. Catalyst exhausts are expensive test failures.

Another good source of used cars are Customs sales - cars confiscated from smugglers. The Belgian government auctions these off directly to the public.

The problem with non-EU cars is type approval - for example white and red turn indicators are not allowed in EU and Speedometers must be in kph. Also US gasoline cars are too thirsty, EU prefers diesel or smaller, more efficient gasoline engines.
clunkshift   
27 Feb 2007
Life / Why Do You Love Poland? [850]

Most people love their country, but leaving patriotism, heritage and ancestry aside for a moment, when you expatriate Poles return home for any reason, what things do you then realise that you have missed most?

Notpeople, but physical objects or intangible feelings (with exceptions as above).

For example: returning to England by plane, I love seeing the irregular fields with hedges round them and a drinking good cup of English tea (even returning from India – sorry) then I feel At Home.

So what are your personal Polish feel-good things, unavailable elsewhere?