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Posts by Polonius3  

Joined: 11 Apr 2008 / Male ♂
Warnings: 2 - QQ
Last Post: 9 Apr 2018
Threads: Total: 1,000 / Live: 711 / Archived: 289
Posts: Total: 12,448 / Live: 11,542 / Archived: 906
From: US Sterling Heigths, MI
Speaks Polish?: yes
Interests: Polish history, genealogy

Displayed posts: 12253 / page 1 of 409
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Polonius3   
9 Apr 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

@kitty1124
POSŁUSZNY: Polish adjective for obedient; as a surname it is shared by over 1,000 people in Poland. It is strictly a Polish, not Jewish name. Typical Jewish names include Margolis, Szapiro, Lewin, Rabinowicz, Srebro, Złoto, Rubin and the like. Which is not to say that no Jew was ever called Posłuszny. Most every Polish name has been used by Jews at one time or another. Presumabyl Yiddish for obedient is close to the German gehorsam, so if any Jew went by that name, he might decide to change it to Posłuszny when that became politically expedient.
Polonius3   
24 Feb 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Dieschka

The Polish vowel y is normally transliterated into German as the diphthong ie, hence Dyszka and Rybka would end up in Gemran as Dieschke and Riebke. Other examples Riemer = Rymer, Diener = Dyner, Riesner = Ryzner.
Polonius3   
21 Feb 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Jewski

In some Polish peasant dialects a j-sound prefaces words and names starting with a vowel. A typcial example is Jadam i Jewa for our biblial foreparents. Jewski could have originated as a metronymic nickanme-turned-surname derived from the first name Jewa to indicate the unwed Jewa's bastard son.
Polonius3   
23 Jan 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Brzymialkiewicz,

According to Poznań University onomastician Dr Ewa Szczodruch, such surnames go back to German names such as Brimm and Briem. Does that sound plausible?
Polonius3   
8 Jan 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Choroszucha

CHOROSZUCHA: Probably originated as a nick for a sickly person (chory=ill, unwell)
TARASIUK: Ukrainian patronymic nick meaning Taras' son
KOSIOREK: toponymic nick from localities such as Kosiory, Kosiorów, Kosiorki, etc. Possibly derived from kos (blackbird) or kosa (scythe)
WRÓBEL: sparrow; possibly a toponymic nick for someone from Wróblewo (Sparrowville)
BUCZKOWSKI: from buczek (diminutive of buk=beech); toponym from Buczków or Buczkowo (Beechville)
ZALEWSKI: topographic nick for someone living on a lagoon (zalew) or toponymic for someone from Zalewo (Lagoonville)
MILANOWSKI: toponymic nick for someone from Milanów or Milanówek; those localities were probably set up by nobles named Milanowski.

There were nobles amongst the bearers of the Kosiorek, Buczkowski, Zalewski and Milanowski surnames, More info at: research60@gmail
Polonius3   
5 Jan 2018
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

regarding my last name

Please refresh my memory. What info did you get and what else do you want to know?
Polonius3   
17 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

American tendency

The blame lies mainly with the name's bearer. The average American cannot be expected to know all the orthographic quirks of Polish, Hugarian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Albanian, etc. It is up to the name owner to set the outsider straight. If he/she meekly accepts the anlo-mangling, then it serves them right if people call them Rob-loose-key (Wróblewski) and Dumb-cow-ski (Dombkowski),
Polonius3   
17 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

given the large number of families with this name

Let's not forget the element of class and fertility. Poor peasant families with 12-16 kids (only half of whom survived to adulthood) were once not uncommon. Amgnst townsfolk 3-4 offpsring were more common and the survival rate was higher, but on balance they were still outnumbered. Another factor to consider is that centuries ago most people, being largely illiterate, did not consciosuly change their names' spelling. It got changed for them by the way some priest or clerk chose to write it down, and during the partitions by non-Poles of the occupation forces. Don't recall if this was a Prus short story, but there was a scene where a peassnt tells a Prussian clerk his name is Słowik (Nightingale). The Prussian replies: "Czlowik? Das heißt Mensch," (He did not disitnguish the sound of słowik and człowiek.) In America, WASP Ellis Island officials also had a hand in mucking up Polish surnames.
Polonius3   
13 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Poles within Polish territory would use this surname

The Polak nickname would have most likely been coined to indicate some odd Pole living in a predominantly German, Ukrainian, Lithuanian or Jewish community of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and it got passed down to his descendants. When he or his descendants moved elsehwere, the nickname-turned-surname stuck and by then had become just another name with no special meaning. If you have an appointment with your dentist Dr Baker, you probably don't ask him how many loaves has he baked that day. The original John Baker did bake bread for a living but over the generations, etc., etc.
Polonius3   
9 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Guty.

Gajl lists 10 different gentry lines in the Gutowski family including an own-name one (herb własny).
Polonius3   
7 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

descendant / grandson of John

Polish is a language rich in variant forms, so whereas in English there is John, Johns, Johnson, Johnston, Fitzjohn and few others in Polish we have: Janaczek, Janas, Janasz, Janda, Jańczyk, Jańczak, Janeczek, Janeczko, Janowicz, Janiak, Janecki, Janick, Janiga, Janota, Janiewicz, Januszkiewicz and many more, not to mention those derived from the hypocositic forms (Jaś, Jasio) -- Jasek, Jasiek, Jasicki, Jasiewicz, Jasielski, Jasiński, Jasiak, Jasiuk, Jasiukiewicz, Jaśkowiak, Jasina, Jasinkiewicz and many, many more. That doesn't even take into account the eastern-borderland (Ruthenian) root Iwan- which generates another vast array of forms including: Iwańczyk, Iwańczuk, Iwaniak, Iwaniuk, Iwanicki, Iwankiewicz, Iwanowicz. Iwaniec, Iwaszko, Iwański, Iwczenko, Iwicki and many, many more.
Polonius3   
7 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

surname Polak

POLAK: At times used by Jews to define their diaspora homeland. In Germnay, Spain or elsewhere it would identify the original domicile of a Jewish family. Many Jews had such nicknames-turned-surnames as Egipski, Syryjczyk, Litwin, Arabski, Pruski, etc. But goyim also had nationality-themed names.
Polonius3   
6 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Merged:

Cierech surname?



CIERECH: Could have come from the verb trzeć or daielectal cierać (to rub, scrub, scour) and be used to describe someone whose work involved such action. Possibyl also from ćwierkać (to chirp) or its dialectal form cierkać, said of someone constantly chattereing. If it is a shortened version, it could have come from Cieraszewski or similar. Toponymic origin? Possibly from Cierchy in Świętokrzyskie Kielce) voivodeship.
Polonius3   
5 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Zbagniewski

ZBAGNIEWSKI: If it ever existed (no-one at present uses it in Poland) it could have originated as both a toponymic nickname (z Bagniewa) or a topographic one (z bagien). The latter type often underwent adjectivalisation over time, so Wojtek zza rzeki (Wojtek who lives beyond the river) could have evovled into Wojtek Zarzecki.
Polonius3   
5 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

@TwentiethNov
WELESZCZYK: Centuries ago, illiteracy was widespread and even those who knew how to read and write (parish priests, village scribes) were often just barely literate. Some people could just barely sign their names and in their shaky untutored hand easily misshaped letters beyond easy recognition. One educated guess (or stab in the dark) is that this might have originally been Walaszczyk or Wałaszszyk. Possibly derived from such first names as Walenty or Walerian or the word Wałach, a Romanian shepherd ethnic subgroup living on the opposite side of hte Carpathians.
Polonius3   
2 Dec 2017
Genealogy / What does my Polish name mean? [289]

Schiedeck

Hola! Normally the German diagraph "ie" goes into Polish as "y" so the probable Polish equivalent would be Szydek. There are fewer than 8 dozen Szydeks in today's Poland.

Buena suerte! Hasta luego!
Polonius3   
17 Nov 2017
Genealogy / My mothers family? Sobkevitz (?) Moved from Poland in the early 1900's [8]

Sobkevitz

SOBKIEWICZ: patronymic nickname-turned-surname. Root-word was Sobiesław, a first name rarely encountered these days, whose hypocoristic (pet) form was Sobek or or Sobko. When such a one fathered a son, the offspring would have been dubbed Sobkiewicz or Sobczak by fellow-villagers. For info on Poland's Sobkiewiczes please contact: research60@gmail
Polonius3   
17 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

not Belarusian or Russian?

It is often extremely difficult to conclusively determine the exact ethnic origin of many Slavic sruanmes. The -icz, -owicz and -kowicz endings have occurred in different Slavic tongues to mention only the great 20th-century Russian composer Шocтaкoвич.
Polonius3   
17 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

not a patronymic ending

Yes and no. It originated as a patronymic ending but evolved into the toponymic sphere. It also nicely illustrates that before -wicz there was -ic.

Let's take a place called Borkowice. A man known as Borek had a son who was called Borkowic (Borek's boy) by fellow-villagrers. He fathered additional sons and when they grew up, went off and set up shop in a formerly uninhabited place, people in the area would instinctively have called it Borkowice. Translatable as the holdings or land settled by Borek's sons.

An interestimg example of the -ic~-icz phenomenon is Poland's lost eastern town of Baranowicze. In genitive plural it is Baranowic (a reversion to the oldest patronymic form).
Polonius3   
16 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

has always been "wicz",

Not exactly. At present yes, but in earlier centuries it was just -ic as in Paweł Włodkowic, later it evovled into -icz and finally became -wicz. Similar endings are shared throughout Slavdom (in the Balkans it's -ić) as well as in Yiddish (eg Manischewitz -- a well-known Jewish wine company).
Polonius3   
15 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

Topographic

Topographic names were derived from terrain (topographic) features, for example Zaleski from "za lasem", Podgórski from "pod górą"; toponymic surnames were derived from the names of localities, in this case a village called Zalesie or Podgórze respectively.
Polonius3   
15 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

Pucykowicz

PUCYKOWICZ: possibly from pucować (to clean, scour, polish. shine, groom /of a horse/) originally a borrowing from German putzen. Someone with a fetish for keeping something (boots, saddle, metal ornaments, etc.) polished to a high gloss could have earned the nickname of pucuś or pucyk. When he fathered a son -- instant Pucykowicz! It cold have also been Pucykiewicz.
Polonius3   
15 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

WESOŁOWSKI: root-word wesoły (merry, gay, happy, jolly); but -owski endings usually signal toponymic nicknames-turned-surnames, hence more likely than not it is traceable to such localities as Wesoła, Wesołów, Wesołowo, Wesołówka and similar of which there are quite a few in Poland. These are rougly translatable as Happyville, Gayton, Merryburg, Jollywood or something along those lines. Three gentry lines in the Wesołowski family each with a separate coat of arms. More info at: research60@gmail
Polonius3   
12 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

Zemsky

ZIEMSKI: adjective from earth, soil (ziemia); once used in such terms as majątek ziemski aka folwark, a landed agricultural holding or grange.
Zemsky may be a transliteration of the Cyrillic 3eмcкий. Transliterators often forget that the Cyrillic "e" is not the same as the English "e" but actually has a "yeh" sound. But there is also a Czech surname Zemský.
Polonius3   
5 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

BANISZEWSKI

BANISZEWSKI: The -ewski and -owski endings of Polish surnames are nearly always toponymic in origin. In this case, this nickname-turned-surname is traceable to Baniszew (aka Bieniszew), a small settlement first recorded in the 14th c., built round a Camedulian monastery in Wielkopolska. As to the etymology of that locality's name, both Baniszew and Bieniszew are tracebale to Banadyk, the peasant verison of the first name Benedykt.
Polonius3   
4 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

Turala

TURAŁA: one of a group of nicknames-turned-surnames derived from the past tense of verbs. In this case the verb is turać (variant forms: tulać, tułać, turlać) which means to roll somthing (a football, barrel, other rollable object, etc.). Most such names are in the feminine (-a) so Turała would literally translate as "she was rolling". The reflexive form turać się means to wander, ramble, travel aimlessly.

other examples Gwizdała (whistler), Przybył (newcomer), Mrugało (winker).
Polonius3   
3 Nov 2017
Genealogy / THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME? [4500]

Pochinski

PACZYŃSKI: toponymic nickname-turned-surname generated by localties such as Paczyn or Paczyna. There were four different noble lines in the Paczyński family each with a separate coat of arms. More info at: research60@gmail

PS - Pochinski is a fairly good folk-phonetic re-spelling if one considers the American o=ah pronunciation where pot is pronounced like paht.