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Polish inventors - what have they ever given to the world?


modafinil - | 418
30 Jan 2012 #61
Of course they invented the helicopter. And then promptly fitted it with an ejector seat.
gumishu 11 | 5,222
30 Jan 2012 #62
so they invented helicopter but never actually flew it - cause if they tried they would learn about the autorotation effect
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
30 Jan 2012 #63
Polish inventors

Rudolf Gundlach He is famous for his invention of the Gundlach Rotary Periscope (Polish: Peryskop obrotowy Gundlacha), patented in 1936, which made possible 360° vision. The periscope enabled an observer (e.g., the tank commander) to look forward (upper panel of the picture) or backward (lower panel) without moving his seat. Since it greatly increased the comfort of observer and widened the field of view, the new periscope design was used in virtually every tank built after 1940.

Tadeusz Tański in 1916 designed and built a 12 cylinder 512 horsepower engine.

Jan Szczepanik Szczepanik held several hundred patents and made over 50 discoveries, many of which are still used today, especially in the motion picture industry, photography, and television.

Some of his ideas influenced the development of television, such as the telectroscope (an apparatus for distant reproduction of images and sound using electricity) or the wireless telegraph, which greatly influenced the development of telecommunications.

Szczepanik was granted awards by royal courts. Spanish ruler Alfonso XIII awarded him an order for creating the first ballistic vest.

Kazimierz Prószyński He patented his first film camera, called Pleograph (in Polish spelling: Pleograf), before the Lumière brothers, and later went on to improve the cinema projector for the Gaumont company, as well as invent the widely used hand-held Aeroscope camera.

Jacek Karpiński was a Polish pioneer in computer engineering and computer science.

During WW2 he was a soldier of Batalion Zośka of Polish Home Army, awarded multiple times with a Cross of Valour. Among the others he took a part in Operation Kutschera (intelligence) and Warsaw Uprising when he was heavily wounded.

Later he became a developer of one of the first machine learning algorithms, techniques for character and image recognition.

After receiving a UNESCO award in 1960, he studied for 2 years at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.

In 1971 he designed of one of the first minicomputers, the K-202.
ReservoirDog - | 132
30 Jan 2012 #64
Józef Hofmann - patented over 70 inventions. For example :paper clips, windshield wipers, automobile springs.
Jan Szczepanik - 1897; telektroskop (tv prototype)
Kazimierz Prószyński - 1985 ; paleographer, which is a kind of camera and projector in one. Kinofon, solved the problem of synchronization of audio and video. Obturator - aperture, which eliminated the problem of flicker and vibration picture in projection, speaking machine, and also developed a manual film camera for news photography.

Józef Kosacki - (IIWW) manual mine detector
Jacek Karpiński - 1970-1973 first minicomputer - K-202. K-202 was working at a rate of one million operations per second (faster than personal computers 10 years later).

Mieczysław Bekker - technical solutions of LRV (lunar vehicle)
Stefan Bryła - the world's first welded road bridge - in Poland. Made world's first rules of welding steel structures for buildings (and then cooperated in the construction of skyscrapers in the U.S., including Woolworth Building in New York).

Jan Czochralski - method of obtaining single crystals of silicon, called the Czochralski method, recently used on a mass scale for the production of microprocessors.

Jerzy Drzewiecki - aeroplane constructor
Stefan Drzewiecki - instrument for measuring kilometers for horse vehicles(1867), compass to the conical sections, regulator steam engines and hydraulic engines, automatic coupler for railway cars, speed recorder for trains, dromograf - device setting the path of the ship, the first submarine( human powered),The first use of the periscope of a submarine,The first electric submarine , armored submarine of water,general theory of propeller drives,propeller with adjustable blades, plane with automatic stabilizing device.

Adolf Froelich- invented in 1932 double propeller
Julius Fromm- inventor of the technology of production of condoms with latex
Władysław Gargul - tool to automatically perform bulk copies of prints (Estman Kodak bought his patent)

dobra, już mi się nie chce pisać więcej ;) for more surnames use this link :

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kategoria:Polscy_wynalazcy
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
30 Jan 2012 #65
Józef Hofmann - patented over 70 inventions. For example :paper clips, windshield wipers

Actually windscreen wipers were invented by an American lady, Mary Anderson, and at least four other people have prior claims on the paperclip.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
30 Jan 2012 #67
Actually, Ms Anderson beat him to it, as did several others. The windscreen wiper we use today are based on the Mary Anderson patent.

Mind you, Hofman, despite his often whacky inventions did excel in other ways...
ReservoirDog - | 132
30 Jan 2012 #68
o.k this is a nice page in english for those more or less interested in polish inventors: forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=6545

Actually, Ms Anderson beat him to it, as did several others

It doesn't matter J. Invention is invention. It's not subject about who beat who.
boletus 30 | 1,366
31 Jan 2012 #69
Polish pioneers in physical chemistry: Zygmunt Wróblewski and Karol Olszewski
See short introduction here: wieninternational.at/en/content/poland---pioneers-physical-chemistry-en

The Collegium Maius - the oldest building of the Jagiellonian University - houses the university museum, inside which is a room devoted to Zygmunt Wróblewski and Karol Olszewski. There you can even see the equipment which the two scientists used for the liquefaction of gas.

There is also a plague, which says in Polish and Latin:

In this building
Karol Olszewski and
Zygmunt Wróblewski
professors at Jagiellonian University
in 1883
liquefied, for the first time in the world,
components of air
thereby opening to science and industry
new fields of research and application




Jimmu 2 | 157
31 Jan 2012 #70
, the first submarine( human powered)

He may have invented A submarine. He did not invent the first submarine. The Hunley operated successfully 14 years previous, and The Turtle beat it by about 100 years.
delphiandomine 85 | 18,267
31 Jan 2012 #71
Just reading this thread now - why are Polish-Americans so desperate to cling onto people who aren't even Polish when there are so many interesting genuinely Polish inventors out there? Could it be ignorance as to what Poles have actually done for the world?

This guy - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacek_Karpi%C5%84ski - clearly beats Wozniak into the ground.

In 1971 he designed of one of the first minicomputers, the K-202. Because of the policy on computer development in the People's Republic of Poland, belonging to the Comecon that time, K-202 was never mass produced. Karpiński later became a pig farmer, and in 1981, after receiving a passport, emigrated to Switzerland.

The K-202 would have been revolutionary if produced on a mass scale - just shows what a messed up country the PRL really was.

And yet, Polish-Americans cling to Wozniak despite him being a Ukraine-loving German.
boletus 30 | 1,366
1 Feb 2012 #72
Could it be ignorance as to what Poles have actually done for the world?

That's a dud, delph. Jacek Karpiński has been mentioned in this forum several times already. There was even a separate obituary thread about him. And what's worse - two people (PennBoy and ReservoirDog), one of which is a Polish-American, already mentioned his name in this thread on January 30.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
1 Feb 2012 #73
Could it be ignorance as to what Poles have actually done for the world?

Essentially yes. they know very little about Polish reality and the way home-grown technology affects daily life.
polmed 1 | 216
2 Feb 2012 #74
Maybe OP wouldn`t have started this thread if he had known that there were actually many Polish born inventors who invented or established world`s most renowned enterprises like eg. this one :

Polish watchmaker Antoni Patek started making pocket watches in 1839 in Geneva, along with his fellow Polish migrant Franciszek Czapek. They separated in 1844, and in 1845 Patek joined with the French watchmaker Adrien Philippe, inventor of the keyless winding mechanism. Patek Philippe & Co was founded in 1851.

Patek Philippe made the first wrist-watch in 1868. They pioneered the perpetual calendar, split-seconds hand, chronograph, and minute repeater in watches.

modafinil - | 418
2 Feb 2012 #75
Patek Philippe made the first wrist-watch in 1868. They pioneered the perpetual calendar, split-seconds hand, chronograph, and minute repeater in watches.

Should be
Patek Philippe made their first wrist-watch in 1868.

The first wrist watch was by Breguet. First Chronograpgh by a Frenchman or arguably by a Brit as was the repeater. Split second hand - French. Perpetual calender on a wrist watch was in the 20th Century - Patek was long dead.

Their swiss watches are in another class though.
polmed 1 | 216
2 Feb 2012 #76
Antoni Patek originated the new concept of wrist watches , is this what you wanted to say, pal ?
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
2 Feb 2012 #77
The first wrist watch was by Breguet.

Actually Blaise Pascal (died 1662) originated the new concept of the wrist watch. Breguet however was the first to produce them on any sort of scale from around 1812.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
2 Feb 2012 #78
Mods, are accusations of mental illness acceptable on this forum?

Unless Des Essientes is a doctor or at least qualified in a field dealing with mental illness, I would not take his comment seriously.

That, of course, may lead us to think that, if Des Essientes has no idea about mental illness, then he is in fact trolling/flaming.

I am in fact qualified to deal with those who troll/flame and would remind both members and guests that repeat offenders will be suspended for ever increasing periods.

If I were to as much as suspect that Des Essientes were trolling/flaming I would suspend him for up to two months.

However, there is also the point that if members or guests try to instigate the removal of a particular person: then they may go first.

In other words: Behave yourselves, each and all.
archiwum 13 | 125
2 Feb 2012 #79
Dear Sir,

The helicopter was invented by a pole.
Gruffi_Gummi - | 106
2 Feb 2012 #80
A shame you can't come up with some genuine ones not yet covered.

Actually I did, in #36. I have no duty, however, to refrain from contributing to other subjects within this thread.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
2 Feb 2012 #81
in #36

The Teller-Ulam bomb is something that perhaps ought to be forgotten, though if anything, Garwin was even more to blame Ulam though, was an interesting person in various ways.......

I have no duty, however, to refrain from contributing to other subjects within this thread.

Actually you do, since there is only one subject and anything else is off-topic.
Gruffi_Gummi - | 106
2 Feb 2012 #82
The Teller-Ulam bomb is something that perhaps ought to be forgotten,

Science in itself is neutral from the ethical point of view. It's the application that counts. A bomb based on the Teller-Ulam design may vaporize a city, but it may be also used to deflect an asteroid on a collision course with the Earth. Even the former application is not entirely bad: the MAD doctrine (although seemingly literally mad) has kept the two superpowers from unleashing the World War III.

Also, the same scientific approaches that have been used by Ulam for the modeling of thermonuclear reactions can be used for other purposes. The Monte Carlo method (it was Ulam who proposed this name) is used, for example, in drug discovery.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
2 Feb 2012 #83
Science in itself is neutral from the ethical point of view. It's the application that counts.

If only the effects of such a vile invention could be morally neutral.

A bomb based on the Teller-Ulam design may vaporize a city,

Quite.

the MAD doctrine (although seemingly literally mad) has kept the two superpowers from unleashing the World War III.

It may have. The world will be a better place once nobody has such technology.
boletus 30 | 1,366
2 Feb 2012 #84
Tadeusz Sendzimir (originally Sędzimir) (1894-1989):

a Polish engineer and inventor of international renown with 120 patents in mining and metallurgy, 73 of which were awarded to him in the United States. His name has been given to revolutionary methods of processing steel and metals used in every industrialized nation of the world.
...
Ninety percent of the world's stainless steel production went through the Sendzimir process by the early 1980s. Poland, France, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Canada purchased his steel mills and technologies over the years.

wiki/Tadeusz_Sendzimir

After I referred to Tadeusz Sędzimir here, I suddenly remembered that this name was somehow related to alchemy. And indeed it was. Michał (Michael) Sędzimir vel Sędziwój vel Sendivogius (1566-1636) was a very mysterious and intriguing courtier, double agent and alchemist: encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-2830903963.html

But the punch line of this story is this strange document, served from the AGH server, which connects Tadeusz Sędzimir with Sendivogius and few other unconventional Sędzimir characters. :-)
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
2 Feb 2012 #85
Sendivogius

An interesting man. Poland doesn't lack alchemists even today...
ShawnH 8 | 1,507
3 Feb 2012 #86
The world will be a better place once nobody has such technology.

The genie can't be put back in the bottle so easily.
modafinil - | 418
3 Feb 2012 #87
Polish born physicist and optics theoretician, Georges Nomarski is credited with numerous inventions and patents including Nomarski interference contrast (NIC), the method is widely used to study live biological specimens and unstained tissues.

micro.magnet.fsu.edu/optics/timeline/people/nomarski.html
boletus 30 | 1,366
3 Feb 2012 #88
Year 2011:

Polish inventors won 95 out of more than 232 awarded medals at the important international exhibition of inventions Brussels Innova. It is over three times more than the next most awarded country, Romania. The exhibition took place in Brussels on 17-19 November. Out of 12 gold medals with mention awarded in Belgium, the most, as many as five, went to the Poles.

naukawpolsce.pap.pl

Altogether 26 gold medals were awarded to Poles.
The details are available on the Brussels Innova web page, [brussels-innova.com/eureka/2011/inventions.aspx] . Just select an industry sector (blank - all sectors) and a country (blank - all countries) and investigate if you wish.

To put it all in perspective, there were only 15 countries present in that exhibition: Algeria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Iran, Malaysia, Moldova, Morocco, Poland, Romania, Russia, Sudan, UK. France won five medals, UK - one, Belgium - 17.

I am especially pleased to find on that list of 26 gold medalists for Poland a name of a man I used to work with at the same institution long time ago. And I like and appreciate their invention.
JonnyM 11 | 2,621
3 Feb 2012 #89
The genie can't be put back in the bottle so easily.

And this is the problem.
EM_Wave 9 | 311
6 Feb 2012 #90
This isn't exactly an invention, but Aleksander Wolszczan was a co-discoverer of the first extrasolar planets and pulsar planets.


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