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Famous Russian Poles


Sasha 2 | 1,083
28 Nov 2008  #1
I finally decided to implement plans I've brooded over for some time... According to the web page of "Russian Poles" there're now about 95000 of Poles in Russia, half a million people of Polish origins and 1/7 of overall population has had Polish ancestors. Of course with such a great size, the Poles should have had a significant impact on Russian culture, language and art as parts of it, politics, our international image, policy, science on the whole and genetics in the long run. I've made some inquiries on Polish persons in Russian history and the result was rather unexpected even for myself, since it was a surprise to learn of Polish ancestors of some for instance Russian poets who I considered perfectly Russians (well.... that's certainly in case we can speak about Russian nation as of something completely determined in terms of genetics). So in this thread I'm planning to occasionally post the brief biography with a picture (optionally) of "famous Russian Poles". By the aforesaid term I mean people who meet following criteria:

1) They're more or less Poles: means they're either have Polish parent(s) or have Polish ancestors to no-matter-which generation.
2) They put themselves on record of Russian history, contributed, had a significant impact on Russia or vice versa were affected by Russia(ns).
3) I don't pay any attention to the fact if his/her contribution was/is good or bad from any point of view.
4) I don't nitpick in terms of his exact nationality (being partially Jew for example is ok).

These criteria are surely not final and to be edited, as I entirely realize things which are interesting for me, can be arid for you guys. Anyway I planned that following the logic "If I were the Pole, I'd be very interested in what my people's done for those "pesky Russians" being practically part of Russians". :)

You're all welcome to express your desires, (dis)like (so that I may stop or proceed) on that and of course don't hesitate to ask if you want to learn more about one or another person from any Russian sources. Please feel free as well to make any comments or to correct me, particularly if it's about spelling of Polish names.

2mods: I wasn't 100% sure on where to place the thread, so if you think any other will be better please move it there.
That's probably it for now. Let's start...

Adam George Chartorisky/(Rus Cyrillic) Адам Ежи Чарторыльский/
(Pol) Adam Jerzy Czartoryski (January 14, 1770, Warsaw - July 15, 1861, Paris area)


Some from Russian sources in my translation:
hrono.ru/biograf/chartory.html

Russian and Polish statesman, writer, Maecenas, sponsor of Vilnius Imperial University
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilnius_University

Since 1795 he and his brother have lived in Saint Petersburg, was on close with Alexander I, has been a minister of foreign affairs in Russia for two years (1804-1806). As he said his basic goal was to create the better conditions for Polish independence restoration. For this purpose in 1805 he came up with the project of seizure from Prussia and Austria of originally Polish lands with their following annexation to ex-Polish (at that time Russian) territory. In accordance with that project Alexander I (Russian Emperor) meant to become the Polish korol (king) and the Polish-Russian dynastic union was to be established. Alexander I didn't refuse the project however after Russian-Prussian relation got warmer Adam had to leave his position. In 1815 was a member of provisional government in Polish Kingdom, later at the times of Polish uprising against Russia in 1830 was the chairman of rebel government, after the defeat left for Paris.

Wiki in English:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_Jerzy_Czartoryski
Borrka 37 | 594
28 Nov 2008  #2
You have forgotten the most prominent person:
Polish prostitute, wife of Peter the Great and later Czarina Catherine I of Russia. lol.

To make my position clear, with some exceptions we can speak of two categories only:
Polish traitors or political prisoners forced to cooperate with the Russian occupant.
No sense to stress on their contribution to the Russian prison of the nations.

PS.The situation was slightly different in times of Congress Poland (1815 - 1831). Slightly, I said.
Harry
28 Nov 2008  #3
Here's a good one:

Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky (Polish: Feliks Dzierżyński, Russian: Феликс Эдмундович Дзержинский, Belarusian: Фелікс Эдмундавіч Дзяржынскі; 11 September [O.S. 30 August] 1877-July 20, 1926) was a Polish Communist revolutionary, famous as the founder of the Bolshevik secret police, the Cheka, later known by many names during the history of the Soviet Union. The agency became notorious for large-scale human rights abuses, including torture and mass summary executions, carried out during the Red Terror and the Russian Civil War.
Prince 15 | 590
28 Nov 2008  #4
Sikorsky

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Igor_Sikorsky

Igor Sikorsky (25 May 1889 - 26 October 1972)[1] was born Igor Ivanovich Sikorsky (Russian: Игорь Иванович Сикорский). Sikorsky was a Russian-American pioneer of aviation who designed and flew the world's first multi-engine fixed-wing aircraft, developed the first of Pan American Airways' ocean-conquering flying boats in the 1930s, and developed the first successful helicopter.

Igor Sikorsky was born, the youngest of five children, in Kiev (now the capital of Ukraine), in the Russian Empire.

Sikorsky's father, Ivan Alexeevich Sikorsky, was a professor of psychology of mixed Russian-Polish ethnicity. The Sikorsky family was of Polish szlachta origin

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergey_Yastrzhembsky

"Sergey Vladimirovich Yastrzhembsky (Russian: Сергей Владимирович Ястржембский, Polish: Siergiej Władimirowicz Jastrżembski), born December 4, 1953, Moscow, is a Russian Federation politician and diplomat born into a Polish family, Jastrzębski vel Jastrzembski"

"Towards the end of his posting to Brussels, Yastrzhembsky warned the EU that recognizing Kosovo's independence would open a "Pandora's box" of separatism in Europe."
Crow 137 | 7,620
28 Nov 2008  #5
Polish prostitute, wife of Peter the Great and later Czarina Catherine I of Russia. lol.

heh,... with all due respect... she was of Northern Serbs called Sorbs. lol or not lol, that`s what i know.

oops, my mistake. You could be right. Russian Czarina Catherine II was of Sorbian origin, von Anhalt-Zerbst (Serbian)-Dornburg... and, her lover was Polish Stanisław Poniatowski who was real love machine and she gave him Polish throne

Poland tzar
Borrka 37 | 594
28 Nov 2008  #6
Catherina I was Lithuanian - Polish offspring of poor parents and had absolutely nothing in common with (with all respect) "German" Sorbs or Catherina II.

Her origin is well known - "Skawronska" is by no means Lusatian name and Lithuania is not Lusatia.
z_darius 14 | 3,969
28 Nov 2008  #7
Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky

He did a good damn job killing a large number of communists. Possibly more than were killed during Polish-Soviet war.
Crow 137 | 7,620
28 Nov 2008  #8
Not true - she was Lithuanian - Polish offspring of poor parents and had absolutely nothing in common with (with all respect) "German" Sorbs.
Her origin is well known - "Skawronska" is by no means Lusatian name and Lithuania is not Lusatia..

that `Zerbst` (germanized form of `Serb`) in Catherine`s II ancestral noble line telling much about her origin but, after all her Polish or even Lithuania ancestry also isn`t excluded.
Prince 15 | 590
28 Nov 2008  #9
Borrka

Sasha she was (born) German ...
Crow 137 | 7,620
28 Nov 2008  #10
let`s say Germanized and then re-Slavicized
OP Sasha 2 | 1,083
28 Nov 2008  #11
Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky

Righty! :) *Thumbs up*

He did a good damn job killing a large number of communists. Possibly more than were killed during Polish-Soviet war.

All they killed communists (i.e. themselves)... including Stalin. They called it "class strugle" I call it "redivision of the power".

Igor Sikorsky

Sergey Vladimirovich Yastrzhembsky

Agreed. Thanks!

Czarina Catherine I

Yep. Skworonska Marta? :) Second wife of Peter the Great. Polish woman (as some sources say... other say her father was either Latvian or German) on Russian throne. And yes... her mother was Lithuanian.

Russian Czarina Catherine II

As far as I know she was German. :)
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,744
28 Nov 2008  #12
Nah....she was surely polish!

Catherine's father, Christian August, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, held the rank of a Prussian general in his capacity as Governor of the city of Stettin (now[update] Szczecin, Poland) in the name of the king of Prussia.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_II_of_Russia

As we all know from the Kopernikus discussion everybody stemming from what is now Poland (even centuries back) HAS TO BE POLISH! :)
Borrka 37 | 594
28 Nov 2008  #13
Life is hard Würstel and you but not only you still do not understand we are speaking of TWO different czarins, I and II.

Who cares about Prussian *****, I've meant the honest Polish prostitute from Lithuania !
z_darius 14 | 3,969
28 Nov 2008  #14
Rokossowski comes to mind.
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,744
28 Nov 2008  #15
Life is hard Würstel and you but not only you still do not understand we are speaking of TWO different czarins, I and II.

Well Borke....Crow, Sasha and me were talking about number II...you were talking with yourself alone again obviously! :(
Prince 15 | 590
28 Nov 2008  #16
This all people are considered Russian. everybody talks about Russian Helicopter inventor and I'd never called Russian politician Polish.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
28 Nov 2008  #17
Where's the map, Prince?
Prince 15 | 590
28 Nov 2008  #18
Do you have kind of complex ?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
28 Nov 2008  #19
Maybe, it's called winding you up
Filios1 8 | 1,336
28 Nov 2008  #20
Do you have kind of complex

£ukasz, why do you still use the Prince account? Why not your old account?
OP Sasha 2 | 1,083
28 Nov 2008  #21
Alexander Sergeevich Griboedov/(Rus cyr)Александр Сергеевич Грибоедов

famous Russian poet, writer, dramatist, composer, diplomatist, known as a "homo unius libri" (man of a one book) for his "Wit works woe" (Mądremu biada - pol, Gore ot uma - rus).

bibliotekar.ru/beg/239.htm
Griboedovs - Russian noble family of Polish origins. Jan Grzybowski left Poland for Russia in the beginning of XVII century. His son Fedor changed the last name to Griboedov and worked as a clerk. Alexander Griboedov originated from this kin.

Alexander was born in 1790 (1795) in Moscow and was killed in Teheran in 1829 when religious fanatics devastated Russian diplomatic mission there.

Wiki in English:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexandr_Griboyedov

This all people are considered Russian. everybody talks about Russian Helicopter inventor and I'd never called Russian politician Polish.

Prince, see above. I don't call those people Polish. I' just drawing your attention to the fact they had Polish ancestors (more or less). Thought it could be interesting for you.
Prince 15 | 590
28 Nov 2008  #22
Sasha you know when Poles deny that Russians have something in common with us it is not problem with people. It is problem that we think "Slavs" = "Russian emipre, occupation, dicature, regime".

We love our own political system and we have nothing against Europe or USA but I agree that there are some issues which connect our nations.

Like some personalities you mentioned, some language similarities, some traditions.

I like Russian ballet:

youtu.be/2mGMM9xOszo
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
29 Nov 2008  #23
Come on guys....don't fool yourselves... The fact is, there are no any "Russian Poles", because if you are Russian, then you are Russian, and there is no metter what kind of roots you have!
Prince 15 | 590
29 Nov 2008  #24
As I've said Jastrzembski is Russian.

I'd count them as Polish.

According to the web page of "Russian Poles" (URL) there're now about 95000 of Poles in Russia

ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
29 Nov 2008  #25
As I've said Jastrzembski is Russian.

Certainly! Even more, Dzerzhinskiy was Russian too
Prince 15 | 590
29 Nov 2008  #26
I don't agree. He was Soviet it was his choice he was supporting this regime and he didn't defend himself as Soviet of "xxx" origin on anny trial and he never claimed to be victim of anti-polish plot, he was commie Soviet to the end.

If you want you can take Dzerzhinskiy because Russia seems to be successor of Soviet traditions.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
29 Nov 2008  #27
claimed to be victim of anti-polish plot he was commie Soviet to the end.

Soviet = Russian
Prince 15 | 590
29 Nov 2008  #28
You would like it to be so ... but if we talk bout heritage Putin it might be so.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
29 Nov 2008  #29
What a load of bull ! What do you mean, saying about Putin's heritage? Russia is Russia, Soviet or Tsarist, it dosen't matter! And Rusians are proud by every bit of their history, anyway I would never change one most miserable piece of Russian history on all arrogant Polish heritage!
Crow 137 | 7,620
29 Nov 2008  #30
hey people, did you heard for newest Serbian joke. i heard it today in bus

It says... ``did you heard that Russia instaling Iskandar missiles?``... ``sure, and Black House protested``


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