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Polish equivalent of "Jessie"?


pawian 176 | 14,299
18 Mar 2020 #31
Jessie is known in Poland. However, I remember being surprised to hear "Jared" for the first time in the film Night at the Museum 15 years ago. It sounded very strange.

The equivalent of Jared could be Jarek from Jarosław.
Robbin
16 Oct 2020 #32
My Mother's birth name was Czesława and they called her Tessie. She was born in US, Lived in Poland from the age of 6-16 and then came back to the US. That was what she was known as her entire life.
pawian 176 | 14,299
17 Oct 2020 #33
My Mother's birth name was Czesława and they called her Tessie.

I would never think Tessi comes from Czesława. Was it too difficult to utter her name as Czessi - "cz" pronounced like "ch" in chair?
Cilli - | 2
7 Jan 2021 #34
My dad's name is Zdzisław and I've never heard neither him nor any relatives and friends in Poland use Jesse as a nickname for Zdzislaw, that sounds really weird and wrong in my ears. Same goes for Jessie as a nickname for Zdzisława. But I'm not American so I can't say anything about how Americans use these nicknames. Jessie as an American nickname for Czesława sounds right in my ears though. Seems like this is op's conclusion as well!
jon357 66 | 16,957
7 Jan 2021 #35
But I'm not American so I can't say anything about how Americans use these nicknames

It's hard to imagine many Americans pronouncing Zdzisiek easiiy.

They have enough trouble with schedule, tomato and patent.
Ohana - | 2
7 Jan 2021 #36
Czesława, Mieczysława
Cilli - | 2
8 Jan 2021 #37
@jon357.

I struggle with it myself and it's his first name😅 My dad goes by Zdzisław, Zdzisiek or Zdisio both here in my birthcountry and in Poland.
pawian 176 | 14,299
8 Jan 2021 #38
The first name Zdzisław seems a bit old fashioned today. I haven`t had a student with that name for ..... hmm, about 15 years.
Poloniusz 4 | 570
9 Jan 2021 #39
My dad's name is Zdzisław

Zdzisław is a very fine and distinguished name with many notable Poles bearing it.

At least your father wasn't saddled with something stale and cringey like Szymon or Jakub.
pawian 176 | 14,299
9 Jan 2021 #40
My father`s name was Mojsze. How does it translate into English?
mafketis 24 | 9,350
9 Jan 2021 #41
Usually Moishe....

en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Moishe
Poloniusz 4 | 570
9 Jan 2021 #42
Mojsze. How does it translate into English?

Moldy!


pawian 176 | 14,299
9 Jan 2021 #43
Zdzisław is a very fine and distinguished name with many notable Poles bearing it.

No, you don`t know Polish reality at all.
It was, probably decades ago. Now it sounds funny, especially in dimunitive form: Zdzichu. Reminds of characters from jokes about country boys.. My wife`s aunt or another relative, about 80 now, is called Zdzisława and whenever I hear they talk about Zdzicha, I smile.

@mafketis
Thanks.

@Poloniusz
Błee, you are disgusting.
Poloniusz 4 | 570
9 Jan 2021 #44
Reminds of characters from jokes.

Jokes no doubt written and told by Polish haters with names like Mojsze, Szymon, and Jakub.
pawian 176 | 14,299
9 Jan 2021 #45
Polish haters with names like Mojsze

Of course not. My father loved Poland and never wanted to leave, even during the worst times, with pogrom-like atmosphere, in 1968.
Zlatko
11 Jan 2021 #46
Żużana
udee
19 Feb 2021 #47
My maternal grandmother was born in Memel (now Klaipedia) on the Baltic Sea. It was a German town when she was bortn, then Polish, then German again, then Lithuanian. In Canada, our family always called her Jessie. When she passed away I saw her birth certificate from the old country and it said Czesława (all accent punctuation omitted). My research, which always ignores Wikipedia entries as they are highly inaccurate without references, indicates the name originated in the Baltic-Slavic language.


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