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What are common Polish character traits?


Dirk diggler 9 | 4,413
20 May 2019 #361
equally apply to some people from any country, not just Poland.

Not at all. For example German people are more orderly, not superstitious, less traditional, not as hospitable, not nearly as gossping, etc. Or even take British they're far more friendly to strangers than Poles, far more trusting whereas poles generally assume a stranger has an ulterior motive for being nice. Chinese are more shrewd. people from carribean are not as materialistic, they're lazier, relaxed and even move slow while Poles generally are hard working and always seem to be busy or in a rush especially urban poles
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
20 May 2019 #362
Not to mention, love for freedom. There are many things most Poles take for granted, which is a dream in other countries. It's focus on the common good and national rhetoric is appealing to many Poles as Poles are pretty individualistic in daily life.
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,413
20 May 2019 #363
there's little respect for family values here

I'd have to disagree with that. Poles are very family oriented when compared to many other countries - way more so than USA. But yes, this is something that sadly has declined a lot. It's part of globalism quite frankly. Under communism and even up until perhaps a decade ago the family was very close - grandparents, uncles, cousins, everyone would meet up regularly. No one would think of abandoning their parents once they get old. It was also common for several generations to live in the same household which is pretty rare now except for rural areas. Still though, I feel that Poles are more family oriented than many other nations, but less so than say like Italy, Mexico, etc. Now the youth in Poland just goes their own way eventually get married, have kids, and they lose touch with extended family.
pawian 161 | 9,971
27 Jul 2019 #364
It was also common for several generations to live in the same household

That wasn`t their own choice, really, but a result of shortage of apartments - people had to live in multigeneration families as they couldn`t afford an independent accommodation. But the truth is that Poles as individuals love to be independent. That is why that tradition from communist times has changed today.
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
28 Jul 2019 #365
Dirk, add to those German attributes, more darkly cynical as well:-)
johnny reb 18 | 3,683
5 Oct 2019 #366
One of the most admired traits of the Polish was 'hard workers'.
This trait seems to have been lost in this generation.
Poland must not have had welfare programs in the old days. yes ?
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
5 Oct 2019 #367
True. The Poles, particularly under Communism, had a reputation as workers, not shirkers!
Many a time I can recall during a period not all that long ago, when many of the local cleaning women were typically older Poles, that they were known to be exceptionally clean and with their nose to the grindstone.
pawian 161 | 9,971
5 Oct 2019 #368
This trait seems to have been lost in this generation.

No, it hasn`t been lost. Poles work longer weekly than other nations in Europe. Partly due to backwardness and less advanced technologies, but the fact is a fact. .
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
5 Oct 2019 #369
My first Polish primer was called "PRACOWITA MATKA", from around the late sixties or so. Here, the units and readings stressed the tough, self-reliant, yet diligent Polish mother, always hard at work for her family, and of course, the State!
pawian 161 | 9,971
5 Oct 2019 #370
My first Polish primer was called "PRACOWITA MATKA", from around the late sixties or so

This?:



Ziemowit 12 | 3,582
5 Oct 2019 #371
Has there been any primer like "PRACOWITY OJCIEC"? Just wondering ...
pawian 161 | 9,971
5 Oct 2019 #372
Not yet, I am afraid. But you are right - the equality must become a real entity, not an empty slogan! (like so far). I demand full equality! E.g., I want to bear children, like my wife!
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
6 Oct 2019 #373
Well, here in the US, we know only from "deadbeat dads", never moms!
:-)
pawian 161 | 9,971
6 Oct 2019 #374
Know from or of, coz I am a bit lost?
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
7 Oct 2019 #375
"Know FROM" is acceptably correct US usage! What you Europeans learn
in British English, I wouldn't have a clue:-)
mafketis 21 | 7,393
7 Oct 2019 #376
"Know FROM" i

I associate 'know from' with the greater NYC area (pretty sure it's originally a calque from Yiddish) as an informal variant of 'know about'. I'm not sure if I use it or not... I can imagine maybe sarcastically using it "Yeah, like I know from X" (meaning I don't know anything about it)
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,458
7 Oct 2019 #377
we know only from "deadbeat dads", never moms!

How about we know this only from the cases involving deadbeat dads, never moms. as an unabbreviated version.
Nothing especially American or NY.
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
7 Oct 2019 #378
True, Maf!

Plenty of gentiles also used to say for instance, "So make like a nice guy and leave me alone..." or expressions of that sort.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,458
7 Oct 2019 #379
That's just bad English. How about, "be a nice guy and leave me alone". Too simple?
Why is everybody looking for a deeper meaning or some fancy explanation to crap talk.
Lyzko 23 | 6,651
7 Oct 2019 #380
It's not fancy, it's merely Yiddish-influenced English, as Maf said!
pawian 161 | 9,971
7 Oct 2019 #381
I had a problem with this from coz I associated it with phrases like to know sth from sb
mafketis 21 | 7,393
7 Oct 2019 #382
fancy explanation to crap talk

Because normal human beings aren't robots like you, only interested in communicating bare semantics, they enjoy expressive, creative and playful language usage.

This is true of all languages, you're the (statistical) freak with your abhorrence of expressive usage.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,458
8 Oct 2019 #383
Clear first. Expressive is second - if not lower - and reserved for the linguistic snobs at the seminars with other linguistic snobs where they try to impress one another with the multisyllable words last used 147 years ago.

I forgot to mention cheese, wine, and a cozy fireplace...

Because normal human beings aren't robots like you,

It's hard to be objective when reviewing yourself, but I don't think my English is any worse than anybody's here. Do you think yours is better than mine? It is not. Just read your last post and you will instantly see why.

People who value time talk straight and to the point. Like me. Freaks and snobs delight in stealing another man's time by meandering, implying, suggesting and talking in riddles. Communicating is not figure skating.

please back to the topic of this thread


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